Eureka! Solved: The Mind/Matter Genesis

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just0
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I reject the premise from the outset, but I'll check it out. I might learn something new
~"“True observation begins when devoid of set patterns, and freedom of expression occurs when one is beyond systems.”"~
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just0
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I can't even check it out, link is dead
~"“True observation begins when devoid of set patterns, and freedom of expression occurs when one is beyond systems.”"~
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Fintan
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Because of the mind-blowing implications,
I'm posting this video twice: here and
also in the historical thread.
Civilization One: The Measurers



Researcher and author Alan Butler reveals the secrets of an extraordinary, integrated measuring system which might have been lost to the world for ever.

It was a system, far more advanced than anything used today, which forms the basis of both the Imperial and Metric measure systems.

These ancient scientists understood the dimensions, motions and relationships of the Earth, Moon and Sun—they measured the solar system and even understood how the speed of light was integrated into the movements of our planet.

Their conclusions fly in the face of everything that we thought we knew about the origins of the modern world but the evidence is incontrovertible.
Minds are like parachutes.
They only function when open.
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Fintan
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The reason oil and water don’t mix comes down to their molecular structures.

Water is highly polar and prefers to associate with similarly polar things like table salt or sugar, both of which can be readily dissolved in water.

Oil is nonpolar – you can dissolve butter in oil but not in water.

Pour oil into a glass of water and the two phases will remain separated with the lower density oil floating on top.

Now imagine a molecule shaped like a string. One end of the string is highly polar, while the other is distinctly nonpolar, but they are firmly connected together.

What happens if you add a small number of such molecules to water? In a miracle of chemistry that literally enables cellular life as we know it, the molecules will all float to the surface and orient such that the nonpolar part sticks out of the water and the polar part faces in, like a group of synchronized swimmers treading water in a pool.

Put them in oil and they’ll do the same thing in reverse – the polar part will stick out, leaving the nonpolar part to face the oil. A molecular handstand if you will.

These bipolar molecules are “surface actors,” more commonly known as surfactants, and they play a critically important role in many aspects of modern life. For example, good hygiene is achieved by leveraging the science of surfactants – dirt particles are oily, soaps are composed of surfactants, and when you combine soap with water the surfactants surround the dirt particles and make them water-soluble. Rinse away the resulting dirty water and, voila, cleanliness! Should you now think of the green chicken every time you wash your hands, well, we can think of worse legacies.

As you undoubtedly discovered at some point during childhood, if you blow air through a thin film of soapy water, a spherical bubble will form. At the molecular level, bubbles are fascinating metastable thermodynamic states. They consist of an extremely thin layer of water sandwiched on both sides by surfactants oriented with their polar sides facing in. Once formed, these highly ordered wonders of the universe drift along in the air, seemingly unmoored by the laws of gravity, the gentlest of breezes pushing them ever higher.
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Minds are like parachutes.
They only function when open.
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