FAQ   Search   Memberlist   Usergroups   Register   Profile   Log in to check your private messages   Log in 
Mother

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Next Level Forum Index -> General Discussion
  ::  Previous topic :: Next topic  
Author Message
Robert



Joined: 07 Feb 2006
Posts: 390

PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 8:54 pm    Post subject: Mother Reply with quote

Quote:

Women in 30s 'should freeze eggs'

Mother and baby
Many women are delaying trying to have children
Women in their early 30s thinking of delaying motherhood should be offered the option of freezing their eggs, a fertility specialist has said.

Dr Gillian Lockwood, of the British Fertility Society, says the measure is needed because so many women are looking to have children later.

This can be because they have focused on a career, financial stability - or have only just found "Mr Right".

But critics said the suggestion was an "absurd" solution to a social problem.

The age at which women are having babies is increasing, with for the first time ever, more pregnancies occurring to women in their 30s than to women in their 20s.

Dr Lockwood is set to tell the British Society Meeting in Glasgow that this trend is set to continue, leading to increasing stresses for older women who want to conceive.

The older a woman is, the higher her chance of miscarriage and of having a baby with Down's syndrome.

No guarantee

More than 30 of the 84 clinics in the UK have a licence from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority allowing them to freeze eggs, although just 10 are believed to do so - including Dr Lockwood's Midland Fertility Services.

Most patients have eggs frozen to guard against the effects of cancer treatment.

A woman wanting to freeze her eggs for social reasons could expect to pay at least £2,500.


We should stop finding these absurd solutions for society's problems
Josephine Quintavalle, Comment on Reproductive Ethics

But Dr Lockwood said that around a quarter of the 66 woman who have been treated at her clinic have had their eggs frozen as an "insurance policy" in case social reasons mean they need them when they are older.

There have been three pregnancies, resulting in four babies, among women among women using frozen eggs.

However, using frozen eggs in IVF treatment is not guaranteed to work.

Dr Lockwood said: "I don't want to encourage women who could have a family at the normal time to not do so because they think egg freezing will be an alternative, but not to know that this is available is unfortunate.

"Women in their late 30s and early 40s look and feel younger, and they tend to feel they have the same reproductive lifespan as a younger woman.

"It may seem very meddlesome to suggest women in their early 30s should freeze their eggs.

"In an ideal world, women would be able to combine a career, a home life and having children.

"But the reality is that it isn't an ideal world."

She added: "I'd much rather that a 42-year-old woman used healthy frozen eggs from her 30s, than she took a chance on her 'time expired' eggs from her 40s."

A spokesman for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said women should be aware of all options, but having babies earlier remained the best

But Josephine Quintavalle, of the group Comment on Reproductive Ethics, said: "We should stop finding these absurd solutions for society's problems.

"I would dispute that we can't change society, and we shouldn't be coming up with these extreme ways of fixing problems in the future."



http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/5319384.stm

My grandmother is dying at the moment,so i'll dedicate this to her.I finding it an amazing time,watching the process of death and observing things about the psyche.Seeing, as she discards the notions of how life is,how that effects us around her in such a subtle manner.

This piece of propoganda is dotted with so much advertising.
It sounds like a financial package.

Quote:
A woman wanting to freeze her eggs for social reasons could expect to pay at least £2,500.

That's cheap isn't it,what 50 trips to haidressers?
but...
Quote:
There have been three pregnancies, resulting in four babies, among women among women using frozen eggs.

However, using frozen eggs in IVF treatment is not guaranteed to work.


so some downside but as doc says
Quote:
eggs frozen as an "insurance policy"


but it's a new business,prices could be slashed....
Quote:
More than 30 of the 84 clinics in the UK have a licence from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority allowing them to freeze eggs, although just 10 are believed to do so - including Dr Lockwood's Midland Fertility Services.


will have its shouty distractors
Quote:
We should stop finding these absurd solutions for society's problems
Josephine Quintavalle, Comment on Reproductive Ethics


empathy......
Quote:

"Women in their late 30s and early 40s look and feel younger, and they tend to feel they have the same reproductive lifespan as a younger woman.


sisters together...

Quote:
"In an ideal world, women would be able to combine a career, a home life and having children.


the fear of losing beauty.....
Quote:
her 'time expired' eggs from her 40s."


And the main con
Quote:
extreme ways of fixing problems in the future

preblotted out by the emphatic
Quote:

"But the reality is that it isn't an ideal world."


So i'll make a prediction....my grandmother is ninety,i'll say that in ninety years it will be common for women to freeze their eggs and wait for the right moment.
It will also be common for a large female population to actively bear children for other women,using their frozen eggs and be paid for it.

Richard Branson's Virgin Mothers,the market leader in offset breeding.

Robert
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Robert



Joined: 07 Feb 2006
Posts: 390

PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a coda,i checked Handmaids Tale on wikipedia,because its at least 20 years since i speed read it Smile and i couldn't remember the precise transaction they were involved in.

Reading one line
Quote:
In Gilead, women are stripped of their independence through the reversal of feminist accomplishments. They are no longer allowed to hold property, arrange their own affairs, make reproductive choices, read, wear make-up, control money, or choose their clothes


accomplishments...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jerry Fletcher



Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 837
Location: Studio BS

PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2006 12:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heavy.
Nice Analysis.
No wonder we're all so screwed up.

Sorry about your Grandmother.
Condolences, and best wishes.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ormond



Joined: 14 Apr 2006
Posts: 1556
Location: Belly of the Beast, Texas

PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2006 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robert,

Brilliant presentation. From the sublime to the ridiculous aspects of our emerging 'Brave New World'. It could be comic if it were just fiction, not real human lives living out these experiments of the think tank boys carried out by the white coat priesthood.

We did'nt ask for the lives presented in this age, nor do I think any of us would have come up with these mad solutions if we were able to be born into a world of our own design. We know we are living in a not natrual human condition, in which things have gone very much amiss.

I've known women of my generation who thought they 'never wanted kids' when they were young enough. Now, they tell me they're angry at me because men can father children much older than women can. Techinically that's true, but of course that matter brings with it a different set of factors working against men too.

A lot of social engineering for a very long time to result in these things..........enough's changed off course from the original human equations to deduce where this is going.

_________________
The anticipated never happens. The unexpected constantly occurs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Robert



Joined: 07 Feb 2006
Posts: 390

PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 5:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Scarlett Anne Mary Brooks was born at 4.05pm on Wednesday at the Portland Hospital, central London, weighing six lb 1oz.

Mrs Brooks and her husband, Charlie Brooks, a racehorse trainer, were said to be "overjoyed" at the safe arrival of their first child, in a surrogate birth.

The surrogate mother, who has declined to be identified, delivered the baby at 37 weeks, said Mrs Brooks' spokesman.

David Wilson said that both baby and the surrogate were said to be "perfectly well" despite a "difficult" pregnancy. The couple "will be forever grateful" to the surrogate, Mr Wilson added.

Mrs Brooks, 43, and her husband, 48, who live in Oxfordshire, had been expecting twins, but one baby died during the early stages of the pregnancy.





Easy to be snide.
But to address the thread...the underlying normalization is well supported.
Note Rebekah actually looks as if she just went through a difficult pregnancy- made up as if no make up and the hospital gown like robe.

R
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Continuity



Joined: 16 Jul 2006
Posts: 1712
Location: Municipal Flat Block 18A, Linear North

PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 4:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

She does have the most *fantastic* hair though, doesn't she? Cool
_________________
The rule for today.
Touch my tail, I shred your hand.
New rule tomorrow.

Cat Haiku
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Robert



Joined: 07 Feb 2006
Posts: 390

PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok so it's now a multi-billion recession busting growth market....



Quote:
The British babies made in India

Michael and Veronica have spent months preparing a nursery for their firstborn twins. Piles of baby clothes lie across three beds – two for the babies and one for Veronica, who will lie awake with them each night. Feeding and nappy stations stand against the wall, which is covered in Winnie-the-Pooh paper. Yet their babies are being born to another woman, 7,000 miles away.

They are among an increasing number of couples seeking “wombs for hire” abroad. Frustrated by strict Western guidelines on surrogate births, Britons who cannot fall pregnant naturally or via IVF treatment are choosing to pay an Indian woman to have their children.

Michael, a 62-year-old GP, emigrated to Canada from Salisbury in the 1980s, and thought he would never be a father after he married his first wife, who already had a family. But after their divorce, he met Veronica, 33, at a medical conference five years ago and fell in love again. They married four years ago. At last, he thought, he could have children of his own.

Veronica, who is from a large family in Russia, also wanted a family but could not fall pregnant because she had been born with an abnormally small uterus. The couple tried IVF four times, but each attempt failed.

“She shed so many tears,” says Michael, who wishes to keep secret his full name to protect his children’s identity. “Because I am a doctor, I could see her result on the computer so I was the one who always had to break it to her. If she saw me turn up with flowers and a bottle of wine, she knew the results were not good.”

The couple finally resigned themselves to living without children – until last summer when they heard of the Akanksha Infertility Clinic, where up to 100 Indian women at any time carry the children of Western clients. Michael and Veronica quickly signed up.

More childless couples are making the same decision. Since surrogacy was first regulated in Britain in 1985, only about 50 couples a year have chosen to ask another woman to carry their child. But the rate has quadrupled in the past six years, as a growing number of older couples opt for surrogacies and new legislation permits gay men and lesbians to do so, too. Although only 203 surrogate babies were recorded in Britain last year, social workers say this understates the true figure as many couples do not apply for the parental order that grants them official status as parents.

Britain bans commercial surrogacy to prevent exploitation, meaning that surrogate mothers can only be paid expenses, such as for maternity clothes. Typically, surrogates are friends or family, or altruistic strangers kept on registers with long waiting lists.

But more than a quarter of British couples are now bypassing the law to find surrogate mothers overseas, where they pay up to £50,000 per baby. India is the most popular country, largely because its clinics charge less than half the rate demanded in America.

At the centre of this £620million industry is the Akanksha Infertility Clinic, set on a dusty backstreet in Anand, a small city in rural India, some 600 miles from Delhi. It is run by Nayna Patel, a fertility specialist who made headlines a decade ago when she helped a British woman give birth to her own grandchildren as a surrogate for her daughter.

Dr Patel admits to running a “baby-making factory”, charging clients from 34 countries around $28,000 (£17,000) to match them with one of dozens of local surrogate mothers, for whom she provides a healthy diet and accommodation during their pregnancies.

Business is rapid, and Dr Patel has thrived in the nine years since she established the clinic. She lives with her family under armed guard in a large house in the suburbs and is driven around in the back of an Audi. She expects to deliver her 600th baby next year, when she hopes to open a new 100,000 sq ft hospital, large enough to house 100 surrogates and 40 clients, who will be offered apartments when they come to visit.

The trade in babies is nothing if not highly controversial. “I don’t think any of us has a right to be a parent,” says Marilyn Crawshaw, a leading academic with a special interest in assisted reproduction. “There are people who say this is a win-win situation, and you can find Indian women who have acted as surrogates who say they have earned more money in nine months than they would in 10 years. But these women wouldn’t be doing this if poverty wasn’t a driver.”

She also worries that surrogate children may be unable to discover their heritage. “They need to have a choice,” she explains. “If the child is curious, they will want to know about the surrogate. [But] if the parents see the surrogate as immaterial to their family, they won’t be able to tell their child about her, how it was for her during the pregnancy and how her other children are doing now.”

Celia Burrell, a consultant obstetrician at Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospital, has called for tougher guidelines. “How can we monitor a surrogate in India?” she asks. “Does she get the medical and emotional help and support that she needs? How do we know she is not being forced into it?”

Michael admits that such questions originally troubled him. “We obviously considered the fact that there may be some unfortunate poor woman who is doing it out of desperation. But other infertility clinics don’t care for the surrogates in the same way that Dr Patel does. With the knowledge we have, we are reassured that what the clinic said originally is true: the surrogates are taken good care of, they do it voluntarily, their families are involved in the decision and the outcome is an improved lifestyle for their children because they don’t have to struggle so much to survive.”

Dr Patel pays each of the women about £5,000. She encourages them to spend it on a house with their sole name on the title deeds, and employs embroidery teachers so the surrogates leave with a better chance of finding work. She also encourages clients to inquire about the well-being of their surrogates, and regrets taking on those who do not. “A couple of sentences is all it takes,” she insists.

“This woman is an absolute saint,” says Michael. “If the surrogates have abusive relationships, she makes sure the husband doesn’t take the money. I never got the feeling she was in it for profit. Every day, women lined up for the free gynaecological clinic she runs for the local community.”

Michael heard about the clinic on the radio last summer and told Veronica. After reading a book about Dr Patel and researching other options online, they sent her an email the following day.

There were also legal advantages to choosing India. In Canada, as in Britain, a surrogate is named as mother on a birth certificate and can decide to keep the child once she has given birth. “We might have gone through all this stress, had a beautiful baby born with both of our genes, and then had a surrogate say, 'I want your baby’. In India, if you write a strong contract, it is enforceable in court.”

The couple flew out in March and – though Michael admits the clinic was “not built to Western standards” – he was impressed by the hygiene and medical procedures. The embryologist harvested Veronica’s eggs and collected a specimen of Michael’s semen, and a few days later showed them five blastocysts – the early stages in the development of an embryo – under a microscope. They chose to have two implanted into the surrogate’s womb to increase the chance of at least one successful conception, and will pay around $33,000 (£21,000) for the twins.

The couple have met their surrogate mother – Kokilla, 28, who has three children of her own – many times, and Dr Patel sends them email updates on her condition, so Veronica can look at the scans on her iPhone.

“Her husband is a policeman,” says Michael, “which is considered a very good job in India. They are climbing into the middle class. I have been told she is having a house built. She told Veronica it is wonderful that her own children are now going to have a great education. They can be enrolled in a private school [with the money]. Education in India is the lifeline for every family – it gets you out of the pits you are in.”

The couple were made to sign an agreement promising to collect their children even if they are born with a disability, but Michael says they would be grateful for any life, after living without children for so long. Nor would they have terminated the pregnancy if disabilities were spotted early on. “They would be loved and brought up just the same.” The pregnancy has gone smoothly so far, however, and the twins are due to be born on November 21.

The couple will stay in a nearby hotel once their children are born. They are not allowed to return home until Canadian authorities have taken DNA samples to establish that they are the genetic parents.

Even though she has not carried their babies, Veronica has bonded with the ultrasound pictures and is certain she will feel an immediate connection to them. She has already made a list of baby names. “They are my Alexander and my Katarina,” she says. “It is sentimental but I have had their names for two years, always saying I would one day have these two.”

Michael is also looking forward to teaching them to play sport. “They don’t play cricket here, but my kids are going to play. Hopefully, some Indian heritage has got into them for that.”

They have told only three close friends about the surrogacy, fearing playground bullying if too many know – but they will tell the children once they are teenagers. In fact, they are so happy with the process that they are already considering using the remaining three blastocysts. “You’ve read my wife’s mind. She is already planning it.”

For now, though, the couple must await news of the birth. “Veronica has suffered a lot. The greatest joy anybody could have is seeing the faces of those little ones that are part of you. I know I will be very emotional.”

Next week Veronica will fly out to stay near the hospital, carrying a case laden with gifts for Kokilla, with whom she wants to keep in touch after the birth. “We will forever be grateful to her because of what she has done,” says Michael. “This woman is a heroine to us.”


source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/women_shealth/10324970/The-British-babies-made-in-India.html

Nayna Patel has the full Rebekah hair....
Big investment opportunities for India~ confiscate gold but give tax breaks for surrogacy.

R
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
RedMahna



Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Posts: 1512
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the minority movement has been exceptionally empowering more-so for white women than any other group. they have been the heavy winners overall in winning "equality" - which it has claimed to be fighting for. the rest of them have a bit of luck, here and there. but so far, no separate neighborhoods have been set aside for gender. perhaps someday...

red

_________________
just cos things are fucked up doesn't mean it isn't progress...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Next Level Forum Index -> General Discussion All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Theme xand created by spleen.