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Fukushima Atmospheric Radiation in USA Articles

 
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7he4uthor



Joined: 01 Jan 2012
Posts: 106
Location: 7he he4RT

PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 3:33 pm    Post subject: Fukushima Atmospheric Radiation in USA Articles Reply with quote

Fukushima Atmospheric Radiation Plume Hit Southern and Central California

The Journal Environmental Science and Technology reports in a new study that the Fukushima radiation plume contacted North America at California “with greatest exposure in central and southern California”, and that Southern California had 2,500 Bq/kg of iodine-131 in seaweed … over 500% higher than other tests in the U.S. and Canada:


Projected paths of the radioactive atmospheric plume emanating from the Fukushima reactors, best described as airborne particles or aerosols for 131I, 137Cs, and 35S, and subsequent atmospheric monitoring showed it coming in contact with the North American continent at California, with greatest exposure in central and southern California. Government monitoring sites in Anaheim (southern California) recorded peak airborne concentrations of 131I at 1.9 pCi m−3

Anaheim is where Disneyland is located.

EneNews summarizes the data:


Corona Del Mar (Highest in Southern California)
◾2.5 Bq/gdwt (gram dry weight)= 2,500 Bq/kg of dry seaweed


Santa Cruz (Highest in Central California)
◾2.0 Bq/gdwt = 2,000 Bq/kg of dry seaweed

Simon Fraser University in Canada also tested North American seaweed after Fukushima:
◾“In samples of dehydrated seaweed taken on March 15 near the North Vancouver SeaBus terminal, the count was zero; on March 22 it was 310 Bq per kilogram; and by March 28 it was 380 Bq/kg.” -Vancouver Sun

◾Seaweed in Seattle also tested positive for iodine-131; levels were not reported -KIRO

◾No results after March 28 were reported

In addition, radioactive debris is starting to wash up on the Pacific Coast. And because the Japanese are burning radioactive materials instead of disposing of them, radioactive rain-outs will continue for some time … even on the Pacific Coast.

Of course, the government is doing everything it can to help citizens cover up what’s occurring. Wepointed out in January:


Instead of doing much to try to protect their citizens from Fukushima, Japan, the U.S. and the EU all just raised the radiation levels they deem “safe”.

Nuclear expert Arnie Gundersen says that high-level friends in the State Department told him that Hillary Clinton signed a pact with her counterpart in Japan agreeing that the U.S. will continue buying seafood from Japan, despite that food not being tested for radioactive materials [see this].

And the Department of Energy is trying to replace the scientifically accepted model of the dangers of low dose radiation based on voodoo science. Specifically, DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley Labs used a mutant line of human cells in a petri dish which was able to repair damage from low doses of radiation, and extrapolated to the unsupported conclusion thateveryone is immune to low doses of radiation….

Indeed:


American and Canadian authorities have virtually stopped monitoring airborne radiation, and are not testing fish for radiation. (Indeed, the EPA reacted to Fukushima by raising “acceptable” radiation levels.)

So – as in Japan – radiation is usually discovered by citizens and the handful of research scientists with funding to check, and not the government. See this, this, this, this, this andthis.

The Japanese government’s entire strategy from day one has been to cover up the severity of the Fukushima accident. This has likely led to unnecessary, additional deaths.

Indeed, the core problem is that all of the world’s nuclear agencies are wholly captured by the nuclear industry … as are virtually all of the supposedly independent health agencies.

So the failure of the American, Canadian and other governments to test for and share results is making it difficult to hold an open scientific debate about what is happening.

And it’s not just radiation from Japan. An effort by the Southern California Edison power company tosecretly ramp up production to avoid public disclosure may have led to a leak at the San Onofre nuclear power plant.

And see these articles on California radiation exposure courtesy of EneNews:
◾Anaheim, CA has highest amount of radioactive fallout of any EPA air monitoring station in Continental U.S. for iodine-131
◾Over EPA limit: Cesium levels in San Francisco area milk now higher than 6 months ago
◾USGS: Los Angeles area had highest cesium deposition in US after Fukushima
◾“Tends to concentrate in the testicles”: 360+ atoms of radioactive sulfur per day may have been inhaled by Californians after Fukushima
◾Unprecedented Spike: 1501 atoms of radioactive sulfur per meter³ was detected in California air
◾Radioactive sulfur in California spiked to highest levels ever detected: University researchers
◾Controversy after US gov’t estimate showed 40,000 microsievert thyroid dose for California infants from Fukushima — Data not released to public — “Very high doses to children”
◾Spike in radiation levels for West Coast? “Abnormal” readings on 8 of 18 EPA monitors for California, Oregon, Washington — Devices now “undergoing quality review”
◾Nuclear policy expert: “Striking” that radioactive iodine-131 in California rainwater is so far above level permitted in drinking water
◾Uranium-234 detected in Hawaii, Southern California, and Seattle


The original source of this article is Washiington's Blog

Copyright © Washington's Blog, Washiington's Blog, 2012




http://www.globalresearch.ca/california-slammed-with-fukushima-radiation/30043




























































































































































































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Preview YouTube video EU raises level of Japan nuclear radiation allowed in ships and cargo imported from Japan by 300%.












EU raises level of Japan nuclear radiation allowed in ships and cargo imported from Japan by 300%.


































































7he 4uthor <7he4uthor>


1:20 PM (1 hour ago)








to me













The plethora of radiation units measuring all these elements gets in the way of understanding what they mean. The activity, or amount of energetic particles emitted into the environment, is measured in curies and becquerels, but the amount of radiation energy absorbed by living tissue is expressed in sieverts. Named for the Swedish physicist who was a founder of the International Radiation Protection Association, the sievert scale is the closest thing to a measure of biological effectiveness available. For humans, outright radiation sickness (red skin, nausea, organ failure) starts at about 1.0 sievert. (In this article and accompanying graphics, doses have been converted to sieverts for comparison.)


http://www.psmag.com/books-and-culture/is-radiation-actually-good-for-some-of-us-39703















































































































































































































































































































































7he 4uthor <7he4uthor>


1:21 PM (1 hour ago)








to me













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Study: Fukushima airborne plumes “caused significant deposition of radioactivity over North America” — Especially for West Coast and eastern U.S. — Around 13% of all radioactive iodine released into atmosphere was deposited over USA and Canada (MAP)



Published: February 14th, 2014 at 1:03 pm ET
By ENENews
Email Article Email Article
77 comments
Tweet





European Commission, Science for Environment Policy News Alert (pdf): The 2011 nuclear accident at Fukushima, Japan, caused the release of large amounts of radionuclides (unstable atoms that produce radioactive emissions) to the atmosphere. Caesium and iodine radionuclides can negatively affect human health through the contamination of air, water, soil and agricultural products. The EU-funded study1 modelled the global spread of radionuclides of caesium and iodine from Fukushima in the atmosphere [...] or iodine radionuclides [...] meteorological conditions and convection promote more long-distance transport. This is because iodine does not dissolve as easily as caesium so it


remains in a gaseous form and is redistributed by convection to the troposphere (lowest part of atmosphere) where the wind speed is greater and transports the iodine greater distances. The model results suggest that 12.7% of iodine radionuclides were deposited over the USA and Canada [...] Approximately 50-60% was deposited locally in Japan.

Modelling the global atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident (pdf), 2013: [...] meteorological conditions associated with convection and vertical mixing over the Pacific Ocean promote its longdistance transport so that it contributes to radioactivity deposition worldwide. Our model results suggest that the plumes that traversed the Pacific Ocean caused significant deposition of radioactivity over continental North America, in particular western USA, western Canada and eastern USA (>100 Bqm−2). Our model results also show substantial deposition of radionuclides in regions southwest of Japan, e.g., around the Philippines1. Two weeks after the accident, all operational CTBTO stations in the northern hemisphere had reported at least one 131I detection.

http://enenews.com/study-fukushima-airborne-plumes-caused-significant-deposition-radioactivity-north-america-especially-around-west-coast-eastern-around-13-all-radioactive-iodine-released-atmosphere-deposited-usa

































































































































































































































































































































































7he 4uthor <7he4uthor>


1:25 PM (1 hour ago)








to me













http://sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=332​



























Email Article









































































































































































































































































































































































7he 4uthor <7he4uthor>


1:48 PM (43 minutes ago)








to me














Deaths and Mutations Spike around Fukushima; No Safety Threshold for Radioactive Cesium Exposure



By David Gutierrez

Global Research, October 16, 2015

Natural News


Region: Asia

Theme: Environment, Science and Medicine





327

24 3

965

Fukushima-Radiation-Earthquake-Tsunami



Plants in the area around Fukushima, Japan are widely contaminated with radioactive cesium, which is producing mutation and death in local butterflies, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The butterflies were found to experience severe negative effects at all detectable radiation levels, even very low ones.

“We conclude that the risk of ingesting a polluted diet is realistic, at least for this butterfly, and likely for certain other organisms living in the polluted area,” the researchers wrote.

Insects hard hit

The researchers note that although the 2011 meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant released “a massive amount of radioactive materials … into the environment,” few studies have looked at the biological effects of this disaster. Researchers have, however, measured elevated radiation levels in the polluted area, and have chronicled the accumulation of radioactive material in both wild and domestic plant and animal life in the region.

Studies have also suggested that insects may be particularly hard-hit by the increased radiation. One study found an increase in morphological abnormalities (physical deformities) in gall-forming aphids. Another found that insect abundance has decreased in the affected region, particularly butterfly abundance.

In order to test the effects of the radioactivity on local insects, researchers collected pale grass blue butterfly (Zizeeria maha) larvae from Okinawa, which is distant from Fukushimaand “likely the least polluted locality in Japan.” They then fed the larvae on plant leaves collected from one of five different regions: Hirono, Fukushima, Iitate-flatland, Iitate-montane and Ube. Because the five regions are all at different distances from Fukushima, the researchers expected that plants collected there would have differing levels ofradioactive cesium, which tests confirmed. The plants from Ube contained essentially no radioactivity, and were used as a control group.

The pale grass blue butterfly is a species commonly found in many regions of Japan, including near Fukushima.

The researchers found that caterpillars that ate radioactive leaves pupated into mutated butterflies that did not live as long, compared with caterpillars that ate non-radioactive leaves. These mutations and increased mortality were seen even in butterflies that consumed only very small doses of radioactive cesium.

“There seemed to be no threshold level below which no biological response could be detected,” the researchers wrote.

Small dose increases lead to large jump in mutation and death

The more radioactive cesium that the larvae consumed, the greater the rates of mutation and early death. Indeed, rates of both problems increased more rapidly than dosage (a non-linear relationship).

The study was not designed to test for similar effects on human beings, but the researchers warn that there is still enough evidence to be concerned. Two of the locations that radioactive leaves were collected from – Fukushima City and Hirono Town – currently have people living in them. In addition, the study findings were consistent with radioactivity levels found in plants following the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

The Chernobyl meltdown led to a sharp rise in infant deaths in locations as far from the plant as Western Germany and the United States. A recent study, published in the journalRadiation Research, linked a sharp jump in thyroid cancer rates in the years following that disaster directly to the amount of radioactive iodine that children were exposed to in the months immediately after the meltdown and explosion.

The triple meltdown at Fukushima is now considered by many scientists to be the worst civilian nuclear disaster the world has ever seen, surpassing even Chernobyl.

Both sites have yet to be fully cleaned up or sealed off.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/deaths-and-mutations-spike-around-fukushima-no-safety-threshold-for-radioactive-cesium-exposure/5482530







































Email Article






























































































































































































































































































































































7he 4uthor <7he4uthor>


2:10 PM (21 minutes ago)








to me













JAPAN ALWAYS DUMPED NUCLEAR WASTE INTO THE SEA
IT WAS TV NEWS IN THE 1960s








Ocean disposal of radioactive waste


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Jump to: navigation, search


From 1946 through 1993, thirteen countries (fourteen, if the USSR and Russia are considered separately) used ocean disposal or ocean dumping as a method to dispose of nuclear/radioactive waste. The waste materials included both liquids and solids housed in various containers, as well as reactor vessels, with and without spent or damaged nuclear fuel.[1] Since 1993, ocean disposal has been banned by international treaties. (London Convention (1972), Basel Convention, MARPOL 73/78)

However, according to the United Nations, some companies have been dumping radioactive waste and other hazardous materials into the coastal waters of Somalia, taking advantage of the fact that the country had no functioning government from the early 1990s onwards. According to one official at the United Nations, this caused health problems for locals in the coastal region and posed a significant danger to Somalia's fishing industry and local marine life.[2]

"Ocean floor disposal" (or sub-seabed disposal)—a more deliberate method of delivering radioactive waste to the ocean floor and depositing it into the seabed—was studied by the UK and Sweden, but never implemented.[3]














































Fukushima-Radiation-Earthquake-Tsunami





































































Email Article










































































































































































































































































































































7he 4uthor <7he4uthor>


2:13 PM (18 minutes ago)








to me













The countries involved — listed in order of total contributions measured in TBq (TBq=1012 Becquerel) — were the USSR, the UK, Switzerland, the US, Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Japan, Sweden, Russia, New Zealand, Germany, Italy and South Korea. Together, they dumped a total of 85,100 TBq (85.1x1015Bq) of radioactive waste at over 100 ocean sites, as measured in initial radioactivity at the time of dump.​

NOTE

TV News I watched in the 1970s accusedJAPAN of continuing to dump its N. Waste in the Ocean.

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7he4uthor



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Study: Fukushima airborne plumes “caused significant deposition of radioactivity over North America” — Especially for West Coast and eastern U.S. — Around 13% of all radioactive iodine released into atmosphere was deposited over USA and Canada (MAP)



Published: February 14th, 2014 at 1:03 pm ET
By ENENews
Email Article Email Article
77 comments
Tweet





European Commission, Science for Environment Policy News Alert (pdf): The 2011 nuclear accident at Fukushima, Japan, caused the release of large amounts of radionuclides (unstable atoms that produce radioactive emissions) to the atmosphere. Caesium and iodine radionuclides can negatively affect human health through the contamination of air, water, soil and agricultural products. The EU-funded study1 modelled the global spread of radionuclides of caesium and iodine from Fukushima in the atmosphere [...] or iodine radionuclides [...] meteorological conditions and convection promote more long-distance transport. This is because iodine does not dissolve as easily as caesium so it


remains in a gaseous form and is redistributed by convection to the troposphere (lowest part of atmosphere) where the wind speed is greater and transports the iodine greater distances. The model results suggest that 12.7% of iodine radionuclides were deposited over the USA and Canada [...] Approximately 50-60% was deposited locally in Japan.

Modelling the global atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident (pdf), 2013: [...] meteorological conditions associated with convection and vertical mixing over the Pacific Ocean promote its longdistance transport so that it contributes to radioactivity deposition worldwide. Our model results suggest that the plumes that traversed the Pacific Ocean caused significant deposition of radioactivity over continental North America, in particular western USA, western Canada and eastern USA (>100 Bqm−2). Our model results also show substantial deposition of radionuclides in regions southwest of Japan, e.g., around the Philippines1. Two weeks after the accident, all operational CTBTO stations in the northern hemisphere had reported at least one 131I detection.

http://enenews.com/study-fukushima-airborne-plumes-caused-significant-deposition-radioactivity-north-america-especially-around-west-coast-eastern-around-13-all-radioactive-iodine-released-atmosphere-deposited-usa


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7he4uthor



Joined: 01 Jan 2012
Posts: 106
Location: 7he he4RT

PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Deaths and Mutations Spike around Fukushima; No Safety Threshold for Radioactive Cesium Exposure



By David Gutierrez

Global Research, October 16, 2015

Natural News


Region: Asia

Theme: Environment, Science and Medicine





327

24 3

965

Fukushima-Radiation-Earthquake-Tsunami



Plants in the area around Fukushima, Japan are widely contaminated with radioactive cesium, which is producing mutation and death in local butterflies, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The butterflies were found to experience severe negative effects at all detectable radiation levels, even very low ones.

“We conclude that the risk of ingesting a polluted diet is realistic, at least for this butterfly, and likely for certain other organisms living in the polluted area,” the researchers wrote.

Insects hard hit

The researchers note that although the 2011 meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant released “a massive amount of radioactive materials … into the environment,” few studies have looked at the biological effects of this disaster. Researchers have, however, measured elevated radiation levels in the polluted area, and have chronicled the accumulation of radioactive material in both wild and domestic plant and animal life in the region.

Studies have also suggested that insects may be particularly hard-hit by the increased radiation. One study found an increase in morphological abnormalities (physical deformities) in gall-forming aphids. Another found that insect abundance has decreased in the affected region, particularly butterfly abundance.

In order to test the effects of the radioactivity on local insects, researchers collected pale grass blue butterfly (Zizeeria maha) larvae from Okinawa, which is distant from Fukushimaand “likely the least polluted locality in Japan.” They then fed the larvae on plant leaves collected from one of five different regions: Hirono, Fukushima, Iitate-flatland, Iitate-montane and Ube. Because the five regions are all at different distances from Fukushima, the researchers expected that plants collected there would have differing levels ofradioactive cesium, which tests confirmed. The plants from Ube contained essentially no radioactivity, and were used as a control group.

The pale grass blue butterfly is a species commonly found in many regions of Japan, including near Fukushima.

The researchers found that caterpillars that ate radioactive leaves pupated into mutated butterflies that did not live as long, compared with caterpillars that ate non-radioactive leaves. These mutations and increased mortality were seen even in butterflies that consumed only very small doses of radioactive cesium.

“There seemed to be no threshold level below which no biological response could be detected,” the researchers wrote.

Small dose increases lead to large jump in mutation and death

The more radioactive cesium that the larvae consumed, the greater the rates of mutation and early death. Indeed, rates of both problems increased more rapidly than dosage (a non-linear relationship).

The study was not designed to test for similar effects on human beings, but the researchers warn that there is still enough evidence to be concerned. Two of the locations that radioactive leaves were collected from – Fukushima City and Hirono Town – currently have people living in them. In addition, the study findings were consistent with radioactivity levels found in plants following the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

The Chernobyl meltdown led to a sharp rise in infant deaths in locations as far from the plant as Western Germany and the United States. A recent study, published in the journalRadiation Research, linked a sharp jump in thyroid cancer rates in the years following that disaster directly to the amount of radioactive iodine that children were exposed to in the months immediately after the meltdown and explosion.

The triple meltdown at Fukushima is now considered by many scientists to be the worst civilian nuclear disaster the world has ever seen, surpassing even Chernobyl.

Both sites have yet to be fully cleaned up or sealed off.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/deaths-and-mutations-spike-around-fukushima-no-safety-threshold-for-radioactive-cesium-exposure/5482530


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7he4uthor



Joined: 01 Jan 2012
Posts: 106
Location: 7he he4RT

PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JAPAN ALWAYS DUMPED NUCLEAR WASTE INTO THE SEA
IT WAS TV NEWS IN THE 1960s








Ocean disposal of radioactive waste


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Jump to: navigation, search


From 1946 through 1993, thirteen countries (fourteen, if the USSR and Russia are considered separately) used ocean disposal or ocean dumping as a method to dispose of nuclear/radioactive waste. The waste materials included both liquids and solids housed in various containers, as well as reactor vessels, with and without spent or damaged nuclear fuel.[1] Since 1993, ocean disposal has been banned by international treaties. (London Convention (1972), Basel Convention, MARPOL 73/78)

However, according to the United Nations, some companies have been dumping radioactive waste and other hazardous materials into the coastal waters of Somalia, taking advantage of the fact that the country had no functioning government from the early 1990s onwards. According to one official at the United Nations, this caused health problems for locals in the coastal region and posed a significant danger to Somalia's fishing industry and local marine life.[2]

"Ocean floor disposal" (or sub-seabed disposal)—a more deliberate method of delivering radioactive waste to the ocean floor and depositing it into the seabed—was studied by the UK and Sweden, but never implemented.[3]


The countries involved — listed in order of total contributions measured in TBq (TBq=1012 Becquerel) — were the USSR, the UK, Switzerland, the US, Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Japan, Sweden, Russia, New Zealand, Germany, Italy and South Korea. Together, they dumped a total of 85,100 TBq (85.1x1015Bq) of radioactive waste at over 100 ocean sites, as measured in initial radioactivity at the time of dump.​

NOTE

TV News I watched in the 1970s accused JAPAN of continuing to dump its N. Waste in the Ocean.

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