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Military Industrial Complex: Sucking the Life out of Society
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Southpark Fan



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2016 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It always seems to be the F-35....but it is the corrupt and deceitful general operating principle I am trying to expose. Stealing tax money for weapons that do not work and cost a fortune. Plus all the fear and propaganda money used to convince John Q that they need defending or offending or whatever....

Emails reveal "hundreds of deficiencies" in US' most expensive weapons program
Sputnik | 27 Jan 2016


Quote:
The digital maintenance and logistics system of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter could be vulnerable to cyberattacks, the Pentagon's operational test chief warned last month.

Michael Gilmore, Pentagon director of operational test and evaluation (DOT&E), issued a warning in a December 11 memo that was recently leaked to the media.

The F-35's Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) "continues to struggle in development with… a complex architecture with likely (but largely untested) cyber deficiencies," Gilmore wrote.

He also cited "hundreds of unresolved deficiencies" in Block 2B software, which is what was in place when the US Marines declared initial operating capability for the aircraft in July.

The Pentagon's F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) acknowledged the need for more robust cyber security testing of the ALIS.

"The Joint Program Office absolutely agrees with DOT&E that robust cyber vulnerability testing is essential," JPO spokesman Joe DellaVedova said in an email to IHS Jane's.

In last month's memo, Gilmore also warned that the jet's software development is in danger of falling behind.

DellaVedova acknowledged that there is approximately four months of "potential risk" in the Block 3F software testing schedule. He said that as of January 15, Block 3F development flight testing has completed approximately 50% of all baseline test points.

The office seeks to conclude testing by summer 2017 and "does not intend on 'short cutting" any required testing," DellaVedova said in an email to IHS Jane's.

The F-35 program has experienced multiple malfunctions, large cost overruns and long schedule delays. It is expected to cost some $1.5 trillion over its 55-year lifespan, making it by far the most expensive US weapons program to date.

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Southpark Fan



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2016 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Pentagon’s Pricey Culture of Mediocrity
A revolving door keeps military brass beholden to contractors.
Dan Grazier | Other Words


***

Around 400 Blackwater Mercenaries Fighting for Saudi-Led Coalition
19.01.2016 | Sputnik


***

And don't forget, the psychos make bio and chem weaponry:

Order Your Very Own ZIKA Virus
Classification Flaviviridae, Flavivirus
Agent Zika virus
Strain MR 766 (Original)
Biosafety Level 2

Biosafety classification is based on U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines, it is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country.
Product Format freeze-dried
Storage Conditions -70°C or colder
Effect on Host Paralysis and death
Source Blood from experimental forest sentinel rhesus monkey, Uganda, 1947
Year of Origin 1947


Would I trust Bill Gates to secure my data with an operating system? NO!

Would I trust Bill Gates to vaccinate the children in my neighborhood? NO!

Would I trust Bill Gates to provide vote counting software? HELL NO! But folks, this is exactly what is happening.


Take a look at this photo of Hillary.

This is who the elite want to have as President. If there was ever a face saying "I am an evil baby butcherer who sold America's most sensitive secrets to the enemy with payoffs made to me via my own charity, this is it.

Yes, Hillary indeed qualifies as the next Diebold counted NWO appointed president who will oversee the final death of the United States.

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Southpark Fan



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2016 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure where to post this. Consider this a covert military experiment? Zika in Brazil does not seem to behave like the Zika we were familiar with before. What is the effect on these mosquitoes that grow up with a mutilated genome? It is thought that this should introduce a fitness cost, that is, they should have greater difficulty surviving. What do we know about these mosquitoes? Has adequate research ever been done on how a genetically mutilated mosquito copes with viral infections? Could the mosquito be more susceptible to certain pathogens, that it then passes on to humans? If a pathogen like the Zika virus can thrive in the mosquito without restraint, it could evolve into something far more dangerous than its original incarnation, pulling the lever on the slot machine with every replication until it hits the genetic jackpot. The people responsible for these lines of thought are reckless, dangerous and criminals. They should be charged with crimes against the planet, tried and then imprisoned when found guilty. Gates is a scumbag.

Zika Outbreak Epicenter in Same Area Where GM Mosquitoes Were Released in 2015
Claire Bernish | January 28, 2016 | Anti Media


See: 2 Catalysts Driving Intrexon to All-Time Highs
*Oxitec was purchased by Intrexon in 2015 - https://www.dna.com/Company/Subsidiaries/Oxitec Major partner Ziopharm ZIOPHARM Oncology Inc Institutional Ownership

See: Genetically engineered mosquitoes nearly eradicate dengue fever-spreading bugs

Quote:
Oxitec first unveiled its large-scale, genetically-modified mosquito farm in Brazil in July 2012, with the goal of reducing "the incidence of dengue fever," as The Disease Daily reported. Dengue fever is spread by the same Aedes mosquitoes which spread the Zika virus — and though they "cannot fly more than 400 meters," WHO stated, "it may inadvertently be transported by humans from one place to another." By July 2015, shortly after the GM mosquitoes were first released into the wild in Juazeiro, Brazil, Oxitec proudly announced they had "successfully controlled the Aedes aegypti mosquito that spreads dengue fever, chikungunya and zika virus, by reducing the target population by more than 90%."

Though that might sound like an astounding success — and, arguably, it was — there is an alarming possibility to consider.

Nature, as one Redditor keenly pointed out, finds a way — and the effort to control dengue, zika, and other viruses, appears to have backfired dramatically.


See: Outbreak of Microcephaly Connected to Zika Virus in Brazil

“If these mosquitoes are completely safe, then why the hush-hush?” says Gurmit Singh, chair of the Centre for Environment, Technology and Development in Malaysia, another country slated for an Oxitec field trial.

See: GM Mosquito Trial Strains Ties in Gates-Funded Project

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Southpark Fan



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2016 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Read this rubbish:

James Clapper: Global Terrorism Doom Porn Extraordinaire

Quote:


In his annual assessment Director of National Intelligence James Clapper told the Senate Armed Services Committee today that “unpredictable instability has become the new normal.”

James Clapper’s assessment covered a wide range of threats that faces the United States. Cyber-security and threats in the middle east were the headlines of his assessment as well as drugs, space and counter-space.

“Violent extremists are operationally active in about 40 countries, seven countries are experiencing a collapse of central government authority, 14 others face regime-threatening or violent instability or both, another 59 countries face a significant risk of instability through 2016,”

Here are the highlights.

The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

ISIL, including its eight established and several more emerging branches, has become the preeminent global terrorist threat. They’ve attempted or conducted scores of attacks outside of Syria and Iraq in the past 15 months. ISIL’s estimated strength worldwide exceeds that of alQa’ida. ISIL’s leaders are determined seek to strike the US homeland—beyond inspiring homegrown violent extremist attacks. Although the US is a harder target than Europe, ISIL external operations remains a key factor in our threat assessments in 2016.

In 2014, the FBI arrested 9 ISIL supporters. In 2015, that number increased over fivefold.

As we saw in the November Paris attacks, returning foreign fighters with firsthand battlefield experience pose a dangerous operational threat. ISIL has demonstrated sophisticated attack tactics and tradecraft.

Space

In space and counter-space, about 80 countries are now engaged in the space domain. Russia and China understand how our military fights and how heavily we rely on space. They are each pursuing destructive and disruptive anti-satellite systems. China continues to make progress on its anti-satellite missile program.

Cybersecurity and Counter-Intelligence

Russia and China continue to have the most sophisticated cyber programs. China continues cyber espionage against the United States. Whether China’s commitment of last September moderates its economic espionage, remains to be seen.

Iran and North Korea continue to conduct cyber espionage as they enhance their attack capabilities.

Non-state actors also pose cyber threats. ISIL has used cyber to its great advantage, not only for recruitment and propaganda, but also to hack and release sensitive information about US military personnel. As a non-state actor, ISIL displays unprecedented online proficiency. Cybercriminals remain the most pervasive cyber threat to the US financial sector. They use cyber to conduct theft, extortion, and other criminal activities.

Drugs

Southwest border seizures of heroin in the United States have doubled since 2010. Over 10,000 people died of heroin overdoses in 2014—much of it laced with fentanyl, which is 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin. In that same year, more than 28,000 died from opioid overdoses. Cocaine production in Colombia, from which most US supplies originate, has increased significantly.

Iran

Iran deepened its involvement in the Syrian, Iraq, and Yemeni conflicts in 2015. It also increased military cooperation with Russia, highlighted by its battlefield alliance in Syria in support of the regime. Iran’s Supreme Leader continues to view the United States as a major threat. We assess that his views will not change despite the implementation of the JCPOA deal, the exchange of detainees, and the release of the 10 sailors.

Weapons of Mass Destruction

North Korea continues to conduct test activities with concern to United States. On Saturday evening, Pyongyang conducted a satellite launch and subsequently claimed that the satellite was successfully placed in orbit. In addition, last month, North Korea carried out its fourth nuclear test last month was a “hydrogen bomb.” But the yield was too low for it to have been a successful test of a staged thermonuclear device. Pyongyang continues to produce fissile material and develop a submarine-launched ballistic missile. It is also committed to developing a long-range, nuclear-armed missile that is capable of posing a direct threat to the United States, although the system has not been flight-tested.

Chemical weapons continue to pose a threat in Syria and Iraq. Damascus has used chemicals against the opposition on multiple occasions since Syria joined the Chemical Weapons Convention. ISIL has also used toxic chemicals in Iraq and Syria, including the blister agent sulfur mustard—the first time an extremist group has produced and used a chemical warfare agent in an attack since Aum Shinrikyo used sarin in Japan in 1995.

See: US intelligence agencies may use home devices to boost surveillance: Clapper

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Southpark Fan



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2016 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Didn't we hear these lies 50-60 years ago? If nuclear weapons did work; what is the US going to do about it anyway?

People should be outraged that they blow your money in this way. Remember, if you are not outraged; you are not paying attention.

Carter defends $583bn budget, says Russia now ‘No 1 challenge’, ISIS well down the list
18 Mar, 2016 | RT


Quote:
Russia is now the US’ number one threat, followed by China, North Korea, Iran and Islamic State, Pentagon Chief Ash Carter said at a Senate hearing on the DoD’s budget request. It comes as the Pentagon struggles to keep the budget to 2017 levels.

Challenges arising from the “great power competition” and Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) still require a $583-billion military budget, Carter said at a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee on the 2017 defense budget request, according to a Pentagon press release.

“The first such challenge is in Europe, where we’re taking a strong and balanced approach to deter Russian aggression – we haven’t had to devote a significant portion of our defense investment to this possibility for 25 years, and while I wish it were otherwise, now we do,” Carter argued.

The Russian Defense Ministry believes that calling Russia a primary threat has become a habit in Washington’s top circles, as it happens every year prior to debate on the Pentagon’s annual budget requests.

“It is not a thing to be impressed by,” General Igor Konashenkov, spokesman for the ministry, said in February. “The reason is simple – the discussion of the military budget in Congress for the next year.One needs to remember that the ‘Russian threat’ has been the best-selling threat delivered by the Pentagon not only to Congress, but also to NATO partners since the middle of the previous century.”

Carter’s repeated warnings of the “Russian threat” are echoed by a chorus of top commanders and military officials, who recently lamented what they called America’s unpreparedness to counter Russia or China at sea, land and in the air.
On Thursday, Army Chief of Staff General Mark Milley told the House that the military’s ability to counter any two out of China, Iran, North Korea and Russia at a time is depleted. “I think the cost, both in terms of time, casualties in troops, and the ability to accomplish military objectives would be very significant.”

Earlier in March, commanders of US forces told the Senate they needed more funding to procure “very expensive” ballistic missiles, as Russian strategic rocket forces “are the only foreign military threat that could imperil our nation’s existence.”

Russian and Chinese policies are seen by the Pentagon as a return to the Cold War era, therefore justifying the need for a giant military budget.

In 2014, President Barack Obama listed the “Russian threat” only second after Ebola virus. IS, which had been gaining momentum in Iraq and Syria, surprisingly was number three on the list. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Obama’s ranking of global threats looked bizarre: “That's the worldview of a country that has spelt out its right to use force arbitrarily regardless of UN Security Council's resolutions or other international legal acts in its national defense doctrine.”

This year IS appeared at the very end of the Pentagon’s priorities list. The terror group was eclipsed by China, Iran and North Korea respectively, all described as “aggressive” countries.

Retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Karen Kwiatkowski told RT that portraying Russia and China as top threats is a justification of supporting arms sales and corporate sponsors. “I do believe that this is a justification for us to continue the flow, the pipeline of taxpayer money into these major weapon systems and their corporate sponsors, which of course are heavily influential.”

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Southpark Fan



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Press release

87 million children under 7 have known nothing but conflict - UNICEF

New figures reveal the number of children exposed to conflict during peak brain-development period.


Multimedia content available here: http://weshare.unicef.org/C.aspx?VP3=SearchResult&LBID=2AMZKT4JOH&IT=Thumb_FixedHeight_M_Details_NoToolTip

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Peter



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2016 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kings and popes present a certain flair
With each and every conflict
We rend our clothes and tear our hair
As our youth die in the trenches.

When will we learn to stop this wheel
From grinding us into the dust
Economies of scale be damned
As well as cycles, boom then bust.

The spread of truth is our weapon
Disinfo their counter-measure
Continue to disseminate
Our one and only treasure.

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Southpark Fan



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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A decisive point of intersection between pharmacology and the technology of violence
Lukasz Kamienski | Apr 8, 2016 | The Atlantic


Quote:
Some historians call Vietnam the “last modern war,” others the “first postmodern war.” Either way, it was irregular: Vietnam was not a conventional war with the frontlines, rears, enemy mobilizing its forces for an attack, or a territory to be conquered and occupied. Instead, it was a formless conflict in which former strategic and tactical principles did not apply. The Vietcong were fighting in an unexpected, surprising, and deceptive way to negate Americans’ strengths and exploit their weaknesses, making the Vietnam War perhaps the best example of asymmetrical warfare of the 20th century.

The conflict was distinct in another way, too—over time, it came to be known as the first “pharmacological war,” so called because the level of consumption of psychoactive substances by military personnel was unprecedented in American history. The British philosopher Nick Land aptly described the Vietnam War as “a decisive point of intersection between pharmacology and the technology of violence.”

Since World War II, little research had determined whether amphetamine had a positive impact on soldiers’ performance, yet the American military readily supplied its troops in Vietnam with speed. “Pep pills” were usually distributed to men leaving for long-range reconnaissance missions and ambushes. The standard army instruction (20 milligrams of dextroamphetamine for 48 hours of combat readiness) was rarely followed; doses of amphetamine were issued, as one veteran put it, “like candies,” with no attention given to recommended dose or frequency of administration. In 1971, a report by the House Select Committee on Crime revealed that from 1966 to 1969, the armed forces had used 225 million tablets of stimulants, mostly Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), an amphetamine derivative that is nearly twice as strong as the Benzedrine used in the Second World War. The annual consumption of Dexedrine per person was 21.1 pills in the navy, 17.5 in the air force, and 13.8 in the army.

“We had the best amphetamines available and they were supplied by the U.S. government,” said Elton Manzione, a member of a long-range reconnaissance platoon (or Lurp). He recalled a description he’d heard from a navy commando, who said that the drugs “gave you a sense of bravado as well as keeping you awake. Every sight and sound was heightened. You were wired into it all and at times you felt really invulnerable.” Soldiers in units infiltrating Laos for a four-day mission received a medical kit that contained, among other items, 12 tablets of Darvon (a mild painkiller), 24 tablets of codeine (an opioid analgesic), and six pills of Dexedrine. Before leaving for a long and demanding expedition, members of special units were also administered steroid injections.

Amphetamine, as many veterans claimed, increased aggression as well as alertness.

Research has found that 3.2 percent of soldiers arriving in Vietnam were heavy amphetamine users; however, after one year of deployment, this rate rose to 5.2 percent. In short, the administration of stimulants by the military contributed to the spread of drug habits that sometimes had tragic consequences—because amphetamine, as many veterans claimed, increased aggression as well as alertness. Some remembered that when the effect of speed faded away, they were so irritated that they felt like shooting “children in the streets.”

Psychoactive substances were issued not only to boost the fighters, but also to reduce the harmful impact of combat on their psyche. In order to prevent soldiers’ mental breakdowns from combat stress, the Department of Defense employed sedatives and neuroleptics. By and large, writes David Grossman in his book On Killing, Vietnam was “the first war in which the forces of modern pharmacology were directed to empower the battlefield soldier.” For the first time in military history, the prescription of potent antipsychotic drugs like chlorpromazine, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline under the brand name Thorazine, became routine. The massive use of psychopharmacology and the deployment of a large number of military psychiatrists help explain the unprecedentedly low rate of combat trauma recorded in wartime: Whereas the rate of mental breakdowns among American soldiers was 10 percent during the Second World War (101 cases per 1,000 troops) and 4 percent in the Korean War (37 cases per 1,000 troops), in Vietnam it fell to just 1 percent (12 cases per 1,000 troops).

This outcome, however, was short-sighted. By merely alleviating soldiers’ symptoms, antipsychotic medicines and narcotics brought immediate but temporary relief. Drugs taken without proper psychotherapy only assuage, suppress, or freeze the problems that remain deeply embedded in the psyche. Years later, those problems can explode unexpectedly with multiplied force.

Intoxicants do not eliminate the causes of stress.

Intoxicants do not eliminate the causes of stress. Instead, observes Grossman, they do “what insulin does for a diabetic: They treat the symptoms, but the disease is still there.” That is precisely why, compared with previous wars, very few soldiers in Vietnam required medical evacuation because of combat-stress breakdowns. By the same token, however, the armed forces contributed to the unprecedentedly widespread outbreak of PTSD among veterans in the aftermath of the conflict. This resulted, to a large extent, from reckless use of pharmaceuticals and drugs. The precise number of Vietnam veterans who suffered from PTSD remains unknown, but estimates range from 400,000 to 1.5 million. According to the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study published in 1990, as many as 15.2 percent of soldiers who experienced combat in Southeast Asia suffered from PTSD.

In her book Flashback, Penny Coleman quotes a military psychologist who says that

If drugs are given while the stressor is still being experienced, they will arrest or supercede the development of effective coping mechanisms, resulting in an increase in the long-term trauma from the stress. What happened in Vietnam is the moral equivalent of giving a soldier a local anesthetic for a gunshot wound and then sending him back into combat.


More: Shooting Up: A Short History of Drugs and War

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Continuity



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2016 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That was a very interesting article about the use of drugs by the armed forces - thx for posting that. :-)
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Southpark Fan



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Military Firms Want to ‘Grow’ Drones from Chemicals
Bryant Jordan | July 6, 2016 | Defense Tech


Quote:

Better drones though chemistry? BAE Systems and Cronin Group PLC of Glasgow, Scotland are developing a means of growing unmanned aerial vehicles using chemicals.
BAE illustration


In myth and literature, old-time wizards and witches would conjure spirits and monsters from the cauldron — toss in the odd eye of newt, leg of frog and whatnot, then stand back and let the hell-broth boil and bubble do its work.

That may be an apt analogy for how future military drones are called forth — er, manufactured.

Enter the Chemputer. According to BAE Systems, this technological leap forward marries 3-D printing and chemical processes, making it possible to “grow aircraft and some of their complex electronic systems, conceivably from a molecular level upwards.”

The British defense giant has teamed with a smaller company called Cronin Group Plc of Glasgow, Scotland, which developed the Chemputer.

Lee Cronin, founding scientific director at Cronin and also a professor at the University of Glasgow, said they have been developing means “to digitize synthetic and materials chemistry,” with the aim of assembling complex machines — inside a machine — “from the bottom up, or with minimal human assistance.”

The same technology also could be used to produce multi-functional parts for larger manned aircraft, he said, though BAE and Cronin appear to be promoting the futuristic alchemy as a means of producing small, customized and incredibly fast unmanned aerial vehicles.

The technology would use environmentally sustainable materials and support military operations in instances where multiple small drones with various capabilities might be needed quickly, according to BAE.

“Creating small aircraft would be very challenging but I’m confident that creative thinking and convergent digital technologies will eventually lead to the digital programming of complex chemical and material systems,” Cronin said.


Just what we need in the world; more chemicals. The website for Cronin has nothing - just a list of directors and a contact page. We know all about BAE.

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Robert



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2016 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is he doing speed?
https://twitter.com/leecronin

Brilliant scientist idiot

Over a wk on I still can't come to terms with the UK euref for #Brexit. It is advisory so surely our smart law makers won't fall for it?

My brain wonders how many women in that standing crowd are in involved in a 50 shades relationship with him...


R
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2016 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

War Crime!

Toxic legacy of US assault on Fallujah
Patrick Cockburn | 23 July 2010 | The Independent


The shocking rates of infant mortality and cancer in Iraqi city raise new questions about battle.

Fallujah: The Hidden Massacre


Quote:
Dramatic increases in infant mortality, cancer and leukaemia in the Iraqi city of Fallujah, which was bombarded by US Marines in 2004.

Questions raised over Iraq congenital birth defects study http://www.thelancet.com/action/doSearch?searchType=quick&searchText=fallujah&occurrences=all&journalCode=&searchScope=fullSite

Iraqi doctors in Fallujah have complained since 2005 of being overwhelmed by the number of babies with serious birth defects, ranging from a girl born with two heads to paralysis of the lower limbs. They said they were also seeing far more cancers than they did before the battle for Fallujah between US troops and insurgents.

Their claims have been supported by a survey showing a four-fold increase in all cancers and a 12-fold increase in childhood cancer in under-14s. Infant mortality in the city is more than four times higher than in neighbouring Jordan and eight times higher than in Kuwait.

Dr Chris Busby, a visiting professor at the University of Ulster and one of the authors of the survey of 4,800 individuals in Fallujah, said it is difficult to pin down the exact cause of the cancers and birth defects. He added that "to produce an effect like this, some very major mutagenic exposure must have occurred in 2004 when the attacks happened".

US Marines first besieged and bombarded Fallujah, 30 miles west of Baghdad, in April 2004 after four employees of the American security company Blackwater were killed and their bodies burned. After an eight-month stand-off, the Marines stormed the city in November using artillery and aerial bombing against rebel positions. US forces later admitted that they had employed white phosphorus as well as other munitions.

In the assault US commanders largely treated Fallujah as a free-fire zone to try to reduce casualties among their own troops. British officers were appalled by the lack of concern for civilian casualties. "During preparatory operations in the November 2004 Fallujah clearance operation, on one night over 40 155mm artillery rounds were fired into a small sector of the city," recalled Brigadier Nigel Aylwin-Foster, a British commander serving with the American forces in Baghdad.

He added that the US commander who ordered this devastating use of firepower did not consider it significant enough to mention it in his daily report to the US general in command. Dr Busby says that while he cannot identify the type of armaments used by the Marines, the extent of genetic damage suffered by inhabitants suggests the use of uranium in some form. He said: "My guess is that they used a new weapon against buildings to break through walls and kill those inside."

The survey was carried out by a team of 11 researchers in January and February this year who visited 711 houses in Fallujah. A questionnaire was filled in by householders giving details of cancers, birth outcomes and infant mortality. Hitherto the Iraqi government has been loath to respond to complaints from civilians about damage to their health during military operations.

Researchers were initially regarded with some suspicion by locals, particularly after a Baghdad television station broadcast a report saying a survey was being carried out by terrorists and anybody conducting it or answering questions would be arrested. Those organising the survey subsequently arranged to be accompanied by a person of standing in the community to allay suspicions.

The study, entitled "Cancer, Infant Mortality and Birth Sex-Ratio in Fallujah, Iraq 2005-2009", is by Dr Busby, Malak Hamdan and Entesar Ariabi, and concludes that anecdotal evidence of a sharp rise in cancer and congenital birth defects is correct. Infant mortality was found to be 80 per 1,000 births compared to 19 in Egypt, 17 in Jordan and 9.7 in Kuwait. The report says that the types of cancer are "similar to that in the Hiroshima survivors who were exposed to ionising radiation from the bomb and uranium in the fallout".

Researchers found a 38-fold increase in leukaemia, a ten-fold increase in female breast cancer and significant increases in lymphoma and brain tumours in adults. At Hiroshima survivors showed a 17-fold increase in leukaemia, but in Fallujah Dr Busby says what is striking is not only the greater prevalence of cancer but the speed with which it was affecting people.

Of particular significance was the finding that the sex ratio between newborn boys and girls had changed. In a normal population this is 1,050 boys born to 1,000 girls, but for those born from 2005 there was an 18 per cent drop in male births, so the ratio was 850 males to 1,000 females. The sex-ratio is an indicator of genetic damage that affects boys more than girls. A similar change in the sex-ratio was discovered after Hiroshima.

The US cut back on its use of firepower in Iraq from 2007 because of the anger it provoked among civilians. But at the same time there has been a decline in healthcare and sanitary conditions in Iraq since 2003. The impact of war on civilians was more severe in Fallujah than anywhere else in Iraq because the city continued to be blockaded and cut off from the rest of the country long after 2004. War damage was only slowly repaired and people from the city were frightened to go to hospitals in Baghdad because of military checkpoints on the road into the capital.

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