FAQ   Search   Memberlist   Usergroups   Register   Profile   Log in to check your private messages   Log in 
Military Industrial Complex: Sucking the Life out of Society
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Next Level Forum Index -> General Discussion
  ::  Previous topic :: Next topic  
Author Message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Visas for Al Qaeda: The U.S. empire program to recruit, train, and provide visas to 'terrorists'
Barrie Zwicker | 13 Aug 2015 | Truth and Shadows


Quote:
If you don't want to know how sausages are made, don't start reading Visas for Al Qaeda: CIA Handouts That Rocked the World by Michael Springmann. The sausages in this case: the string of too-easily-swallowed accounts of bloody events in the "global war on terror," served up daily with relish by the mainstream media. In reality these sausages are filled with tainted meat that's making everyone sick.



Springmann is a brave whistle blower living in Washington, D.C. He's written an accessible book, safe to digest, highlighting details of the corruption of the American Empire (and its accomplices, including Canada) as he experienced them from the inside during his years with the U.S. State Department.

While he served as a visa officer in the U.S. consulate in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, for instance, he was obliged under threat of dismissal to issue visas to persons hired clandestinely by the CIA to become trained-in-the-USA terrorists. Most of these psychopathic thugs were clearly and legally unqualified to be issued visas. There is every reason to believe the "Visas for Terrorists" program remains fully operative today. It takes a lot of expendable terrorists to run a global terrorism op.

Springmann places his experiences both within the context of the historical roots of the U.S. Empire and within its current ongoing global destabilization project.

"This tale," the author states near the beginning, "is a sordid sketch of backstabbing, disloyalty, double crosses, faithlessness, falsity, perfidy, sellouts, treachery, and betrayal."

And that only covers the bureaucratic aspect. Even more sobering is his sketch of human rights violations: torture, assassinations, massacres including bombings of markets, invasions and occupations of countries, destabilization of nations and regions.

Then there's the financial side: widespread criminality, resource theft, bribery, diversion of funds, illicit drug dealing and more.

Not to mention the flouting of international laws. This dimension includes gross infringements on national sovereignty, the casual violation of treaties and ho-hum everyday general lawlessness, risking even the threat of nuclear annihilation.

All this before taking into account the moral dimension, in which trashing the Ten Commandments is just an opening trifle.

"My story shows how things really work," Springmann writes, correctly. In the book's 250 pages he names names, dates, times and places - presumably opening himself up to lawsuits, should there be anything here that the individuals named deem libelous. They might think twice, however, since Springmann is a lawyer by profession and knows his way around the Empire's capital - as well as some of its outlying ramparts such as Stuttgart, New Delhi and especially Jeddah.

Stinging in itself, Springmann's book also can be read as an authenticating companion to Michel Chossudovsky's Towards a World War III Scenario (2012) and The Globalization of War: America's "Long War" Against Humanity (2015). Along the way, both authors deal, to one extent or another, with the ideological, hubristic and increasingly bellicose role of the Harper government as handmaiden to the American Empire, including military involvements in Libya, Serbia and the Ukraine. Springmann necessarily refers very little to Canada, but to read his account of the cowardly and unnecessary rain of death inflicted on Libya, for instance, is to be obliged as a Canadian to think of Harper's enthusiasm and pride in having this country share in the slaughter and destabilization carried out under the Orwellian "responsibility to protect" notion.

Springmann quotes Maximilian C. Forte who notes that before the attack Libya enjoyed the highest Human Development Index (a UN measurement of well-being) in all Africa. "After Western military forces destroyed the country the Index only records the steep collapse of all indicators of well-being. More Libyans were killed with intervention than without. It was about control, about militarizing Africa," Forte argues.

What Springmann brings uniquely to the table is his firsthand knowledge of precisely how the USA recruits terrorists (no quotation marks needed), sends them to the USA for training and then deploys them to carry out murders, torture, bombings and more. The bloody mayhem carried out by these thousands of paid mercenaries - ostensibly beheading-habituated "jihadists" fighting against democracy, decency and the USA and its "allies - is planned, organized and funded by none other than the same USA and its allies. It's a global false flag operation - the largest by far in history.

As Springmann on page 65 writes of the "Visas for Terrorists Program:"

This was not an ad hoc operation, conceived and carried out in response to a specific foreign policy issue. Rather, it was another of too many CIA efforts to destroy governments, countries, and politicians disfavored by the American "establishment" in its "bipartisan" approach to matters abroad. Whether it was opposing the imaginary evils of communism, the fictitious malevolence of Islam, or the invented wickedness of Iran, America and its intelligence services, brave defenders of "The City Upon A Hill," sought out and created fear and loathing of peoples and countries essentially engaged in efforts to better their lives and improve their political world. Along the way, Agency-sponsored murders, war crimes, and human rights violations proved to be good business. Jobs for the Clandestine Service (people who recruit and run spies), sales of weapons and aircraft, as well as the myriad items needed to control banks, countries and peoples all provided income for and benefits to American companies.

That the American Empire has been able to carry out such a massive illegal program for so long is the saddest of commentaries on how deep the rot is, how effective the secrecy, how complicit the media.

As to the span of dangerous widespread deception, Springmann notes that Rahul Bedi wrote in Jane's Defence Weekly on September 14, 2001 that beginning in 1980 "thousands [of mujahideen] were ... brought to America and made competent in terrorism by Green Berets and SEALS at US government East Coast facilities, trained in guerilla warfare and armed with sophisticated weapons."

The point is made repeatedly that Al Qaeda and now ISIS/ISIL/the Islamic State are essentially "Made in USA" entities, brought into being and organized for the Empire's purposes. Among the elements that make possible such a vast fraud are deception, compartmentalization and secrecy. Springmann quotes attorney Pat Frascogna, "a man with FOIA expertise," about secrecy and its purpose:

Thus whether it be learning the dirty and unethical business practices of a company or the secrets of our government, the same deployment of denials and feigning ignorance about what is really going on are the all-too-common methods used to keep the truth from the light of day.

Langley recruited the Arab-Afghans so clandestinely that the terrorists didn't know they had been recruited. They thought that they had found a battlefield on their own, or through the Internet or through Twitter or through television. The Agency didn't even bother to tell the non-CIA Americans involved in giving them US visas about they were doing...

Frascogna's observation intersects with Springmann's on-the-job experiences as a visa officer in Jeddah starting in 1987. Springmann was repeatedly overruled when he turned down disqualified applicants for U.S. visas. He writes:

As I later learned to my dismay, the visa applicants were recruits for the war in Afghanistan against the Soviet Union's armed forces. Further, as time went by, the fighters, trained in the United States, went on to other battlefields: Yugoslavia, Iraq, Libya, and Syria. They worked with the American intelligence services and the State Department to destabilize governments the United States opposed. While it's no secret, most knowledgeable people still refuse to talk about this agenda.

As Springmann learned, "the average percentage of intelligence officers to real diplomats at a given Foreign Service post is about one in three. My experience in Jeddah, Stuttgart, and New Delhi might place it higher—at least 50 percent, if not more." According to the Anti-CIA Club of Diplomats: Spooks in U.S. Foreign Service [sic], a twelve-page, 1983 Canadian publication (see namebase.org), the percentage is 60 percent.

"At Jeddah," Springmann writes, "to the best of my knowledge, out of some twenty US citizens assigned to the consulate, only three people, including myself, worked for the Department of State. The rest were CIA or NSA officials or their spouses." Elsewhere Springmann suggests that essentially the CIA runs the State Department, and that this is true of many other U.S. government departments and agencies as well. It seems that it's almost impossible to over-estimate the reach of the CIA's tentacles or the overweening treason of its nonstop black ops and unconstitutional operations domestically.

Springmann toward the end of the book refers to the beginnings of the CIA. It's interesting for this reviewer to think that he was 13 years of age in 1947 when U.S. president Harry Truman agreed with the National Security Council (NSC) to secretly create the CIA and NSA. I remember that in my teenage years a few of my peers said there "was something" called "the CIA." This was around the time a few people also said there "was something" called "the Mafia." The consensus was that both ideas were very far-fetched.

In 1948 Truman approved yet another NSC initiative, providing for "propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including sabotage, antisabotage, demolition and evacuation measures; subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground resistance movements, guerillas, and refugee liberation groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements in threatened countries of the free world." That's a tabula rasa if there ever was one: a license for lawlessness.

The CIA's twisted hits have just kept coming. It's worth noting that Truman didn't singlehandedly initiate this monstrosity. The dark recesses of the Deep State, as Peter Dale Scott calls it, are where the demonic entity was spawned. Ever since, Frankenstein's monster has been a harmless schoolboy by comparison.

To read of the rape of Libya with active Canadian military complicity makes for difficult reading. The lies are piled as high as the bodies, and these two categories are insuperably paired.

Equally sordid, especially in light of Stephen Harper's enthusiasm for expanding the war on Russia (the economic sanctions and the diplomatic exclusion of Russia from the G8 are forms of warfare, not to mention decades of covert* military incursion by the West onto the territory of the former USSR and now the Russian Federation, as described in Visas for Al Qaeda) is to read some of the history of the Ukraine. "The West's" meddling in the Ukraine has a long illicit pedigree. As Springmann writes:

It seems that the CIA had problems [in the immediate post World War II period] distinguishing between underground groups and above-ground armies. Langley used Marshall Plan money to support a guerrilla force in the Ukraine, called "Nightingale." Originally established in 1941 by Nazi Germany's occupation forces, and working on their behalf, "Nightingale" and its terrorist arm (made up of ultranationalist Ukrainians as well as Nazi collaborators) murdered thousands of Jews, Soviet Union supporters, and Poles.

Even relatively recently, since the so-called Orange revolution in the Ukraine made events there eminently newsworthy, I can't remember seeing in the mainstream media a single substantial article dealing with the historical relationships between the Ukraine and Russia going back to World War II, nor such an article laying out the history of the involvement - overt or covert - of "the West" in the Ukraine.

Instead, we see the surreal ahistorical likes of the top headline in The New York Times International Weekly for June 13-14, "Russia is Sowing Disunity," by Peter Baker and Steven Erlanger. They report breathlessly in the lead paragraph: "Moscow is leveraging its economic power, financing European political parties and movements, and spreading alternative accounts of the Ukraine conflict, according the American and European officials.

True to the narrative of "the West" as a pitiful giant facing a powerful and expansionist Russia, the writers posit that the "consensus against Russian aggression" is "fragile.

The drift of this NYT yarn, typical of Western propaganda across the board, is that there remains in effect a behemoth "Soviet empire" surreptitiously shipping "Moscow gold" to dupes in "green movements" and so on. Even a former American national intelligence officer on Russia, Fiona Hill, now at the Brookings Institution, told the writers: "The question is how much hard evidence does anyone have?

Maybe this NYT propaganda, like its clones across the mainstream media, is not ahistorical after all. The story comes across rather as an historical relic of the Cold War - found in a time capsule in a fallout shelter - that the NYT editors decided to publish as a prank. A sausage.

* Military action by "the West" has not always been covert. Springmann notes that American and Japanese soldiers were dispatched to Russia in 1917 to squelch the fledgling Russian revolution. The soldiers were part of what was called the Allied Expeditionary Force. Winston Churchill for his part said: "We must strangle the Bolshevik baby in its crib." Springmann might have noted that Canadian soldiers were part of the AEF.

_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2015 6:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like the wimpy little kid who ingratiates himself to the schoolyard bully for protection, Canada has once again proven itself a cowardly and insignificant player on the world stage, ready and willing to align itself with America's global hegemonic war against imaginary terrorism.

Canadian military ponders integrated force with U.S. to respond to hotspots
James Cudmore | Sep 28, 2015 | CBC


Canadian Forces planning document says integrated forces 'conceptual development' is underway.

Quote:
The Canadian military has been working on a plan to create with the United States a bi-national integrated military force to deploy to hot spots around the world.

The so-called Canada-U.S. Integrated Forces would be the result of an agreement between the two countries under which air, sea, land and special operations forces would be jointly deployed under unified command, outside Canada.

The forces would operate in the same manner as those controlled by the North American Aerospace Defence Command (Norad), but would be used on expeditionary operations, and not in defence of the homeland, according to a source.

The briefing note, released to CBC News under the Access to Information Act, was written in October 2013. It contemplates how the military could remain globally engaged as Afghan training mission was coming to a close.

Daniel Proussalidis, a spokesman from the defence minister's office, said in an email to CBC News that the document was not presented to the minister and the government has not considered its contents.

Canada and the U.S. have for long partnered together on military operations, including in the war against ISIS and in Afghanistan.

Both countries would continue to operate their own separate militaries, which would contribute units based on need.

_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2015 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Since the tragic events of 9/11, the budget of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) has doubled while the budgets of other departments remain stagnant. Instead of paying Lockheed Martin over $1.5 billion to provide Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates with Patriot missiles, that money could have gone towards improving the failing education system in this country.

In 2001, the base budget for the DoD stood at $287 billion. In less than a decade, the defense budget increased to over $530 billion, which does not even include the primary costs of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. In 2010, the Office of Management and Budget reported the DoD's federal budget at $530.8 billion. In contrast, the Department of Education only received $64.1 billion, while the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy received $27 billion and $26.4 billion respectively.

In 2011, the U.S. was spending 20% of the federal budget on defense and only 2% on education. Three years later, the Office of Management and Budget found that 18% of the budget had been spent on defense with still merely 2% on education.

According to the DoD, the government has spent over $250 billion in defense contracts since the beginning of this year, which does not include any contracts valued at less than $6.5 million. Last month, the DoD paid defense contractors over $38.6 billion, after awarding them another $38.9 billion in August.

Each business day, defense contractors including Bechtel, Boeing, Raytheon, Northrop Grumman, Microsoft, and Kellogg Brown and Root, receive exorbitant amounts of money from the federal budget. This pays for jet fuel, missiles, helicopters, food, spare parts, runways, infrastructure repairs, ship maintenance, technical support, construction equipment, etc.

But most Americans don't realize that their tax dollars also paid Lockheed Martin over $920 million to manufacture and deliver F-35 jets to the governments of Italy, Turkey, Australia, Norway, and Britain. In July, Lockheed Martin was also awarded over $1.5 billion to equip Korea, Qatar, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia with Patriot missiles.

Marred with a history of rape and forced prostitution, DynCorp received $68.9 millionin February for integrated maintenance support services for the Saudi Arabian National Guard Aviation. Responsible for the largest data breach in U.S. history, Booz Allen Hamilton was awarded $12.3 million in July for support services to the Royal Saudi Naval Forces. And in June, L-3 National Security Solutions received $95 million to train Royal Saudi Air Force personnel.

Sprint Communications even received over $10 million in April to provide cell phones to the Army Human Resources Command, while J. Walter Thompson was awarded $770 million for recruitment and advertising for the Marine Corps Recruiting Command. Instead of wasting tax dollars on cell phones and supporting repressive regimes, the American people could have decided to use that money to purchase new text books, update school computers, perform classroom maintenance, raise teacher salaries, or provide free meals to public school children from low-income families.

Over the past decade, the Missile Defense Agency, an arm of the Pentagon, has wasted nearly $10 billion in failed projects. The ill-fated Sea-Based X-Band Radar (SBX), Airborne Laser, Kinetic Energy Interceptor, and Multiple Kill Vehicle cost the agency $2.2 billion, $5.3 billion, $1.7 billion, and $700 million respectively.

Projected to take nine years and $12 billion to develop, at a cost of $149 million per plane, the F-22 jet actually took 19 years to produce at a cost of $26.3 billion, averaging $412 million per plane. Plagued with safety problems, including at least two fatal crashes and a faulty oxygen-supply system, then-Defense Secretary Robert Gates and then-Air Force Secretary Michael Donley forcefully requested that Congress end production of the F-22 in 2009.

Two years ago, former Booz Allen Hamilton employee Edward Snowden disclosed that the black budget for fiscal year 2013 was $52.6 billion. The classified documents revealed that 16 agencies, including the CIA, NSA, and Justice Department, received the secret funds in order to conduct clandestine operations without public scrutiny or accountability.

In January 2005, American soldiers opened fire on a family inside a car in the northern town of Tal Afar in Iraq. Splattered with the blood of her dead parents, 5-year-old Samar Hassan shrieked in despair and anguish next to an armed U.S. soldier as photojournalist Chris Hondros took a photograph capturing the horrific moment in history.

By paying our income, property, and sales taxes, we contributed to this atrocity and countless others. You and I purchased the bullets that killed this young girl's parents. We paid those soldiers to take innocent lives.

Without taking personal responsibility for what our tax dollars buy, many Americans remain willfully ignorant of the crimes and incompetence committed in our names. As defense contractors accrue astronomical amounts of our money on a daily basis, they will continue to circumvent weakened campaign finance reform laws in order to purchase pliable candidates willing to keep them in power.

_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



The photograph above shows what a $2.7 billion U.S. military aerostat is supposed to look like — tethered to the ground.

But then;



and then



$2.7 billion - gone! How much could that waste of money uplift society?

_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2015 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This Shitty Fighter Jet Could Provide 23 Years of Free College for Everyone
Nov 14, 2015 | Russian Insider


Quote:
$1.45 trillion is a lot of money.

That’s the estimated total cost of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which can’t even fire its own gun until 2019 due to software issues.

It’s also the estimated cost of providing tuition-free public higher education for every student in the US until 2039.

Which one would you choose?

The F-35 is the epitome of Pentagon waste and cronyism. The US has already spent roughly $400 billion on the jet, made by top defense contractor Lockheed Martin. The Pentagon has already promised to buy 2,443 jets for the Air Force, Navy, and Marines in an effort to “modernize” the current fleet of fighter jets.

But the F-35 is a lemon.

Last year, it was revealed the F-35’s 25mm cannon couldn’t fire due to inefficient computers, and even once it does, the jet is unable to carry even a minimal amount of ammunition.

“There will be no gun until [the Joint Strike Fighter’s Block] 3F [software], there is no software to support it now or for the next four-ish years,” an anonymous Air Force official told the Daily Beast. “Block 3F is slated for release in 2019, but who knows how much that will slip?”

Along with weapons issues, the F-35 can’t even fly — its fleet was grounded for month in June of 2014after engine malfunctions resulting in the jet catching fire before takeoff. Since 2007, the F-35 has been grounded 13 times due to takeoff issues. In 2008, the RAND corporation tested the F-35 in a simulated air battle with China, and graded the F-35’s performance as “double-inferior,” warning in its report that the F-35 “can’t turn, can’t climb, can’t run.”

To truly illustrate the astonishing waste behind the F-35, this interview with Pierre Sprey, the man who designed the F-16 fighter jet, reveals the inefficiency and stupidity that led to the F-35 project:


_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2015 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Let's begin with the $12 billion in shrink-wrapped $100 bills, Iraqi oil money held in the U.S. The Bush administration began flying it into Baghdad on C-130s soon after U.S. troops entered that city in April 2003. Essentially dumped into the void that had once been the Iraqi state, at least $1.2 to $1.6 billion of it was stolen and ended up years later in a mysterious bunker in Lebanon. And that's just what happened as the starting gun went off.

It's never ended. In 2011, the final report of the congressionally mandated Commission on Wartime Contracting estimated that somewhere between $31 billion and $60 billion taxpayer dollars had been lost to fraud and waste in the American "reconstruction" of Iraq and Afghanistan. In Iraq, for instance, there was that $75 million police academy, initially hailed "as crucial to U.S. efforts to prepare Iraqis to take control of the country's security." It was, however, so poorly constructed that it proved a health hazard. In 2006, "feces and urine rained from the ceilings in [its] student barracks" and that was only the beginning of its problems.

When the bad press started, Parsons Corporation, the private contractor that built it, agreed to fix it for nothing more than the princely sum already paid. A year later, a New York Times reporter visited and found that "the ceilings are still stained with excrement, parts of the structures are crumbling, and sections of the buildings are unusable because the toilets are filthy and nonfunctioning." This seems to have been par for the course. Typically enough, the Khan Bani Saad Correctional Facility, a $40 million prison Parsons also contracted to build, was never even finished.

And these were hardly isolated cases or problems specific to Iraq. Consider, for instance, those police stations in Afghanistan believed to be crucial to "standing up" a new security force in that country. Despite the money poured into them and endless cost overruns, many were either never completed or never built, leaving new Afghan police recruits camping out. And the police were hardly alone. Take the $3.4 million unfinished teacher-training center in Sheberghan, Afghanistan, that an Iraqi company was contracted to build (using, of course, American dollars) and from which it walked away, money in hand.

And why stick to buildings, when there were those Iraqi roads to nowhere paid for by American dollars? At least one of them did at least prove useful to insurgent groups moving their guerrillas around (like the $37 million bridge the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built between Afghanistan and Tajikistan that helped facilitate the region's booming drug trade in opium and heroin). In Afghanistan, Highway 1 between the capital Kabul and the southern city of Kandahar, unofficially dubbed the "highway to nowhere," was so poorly constructed that it began crumbling in its first Afghan winter.

And don't think that this was an aberration. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) hired an American nonprofit, International Relief and Development (IRD), to oversee an ambitious road-building program meant to gain the support of rural villagers. Almost $300 million later, it could point to "less than 100 miles of gravel road completed."Each mile of road had, by then, cost U.S. taxpayers $2.8 million, instead of the expected $290,000, while a quarter of the road-building funds reportedly went directly to IRD for administrative and staff costs. Needless to say, as the road program failed, USAID hired IRD to oversee other non-transportation projects.

In these years, the cost of reconstruction never stopped growing. In 2011, McClatchy News reported that "U.S. government funding for at least 15 large-scale programs and projects grew from just over $1 billion to nearly $3 billion despite the government's questions about their effectiveness or cost."

The Gas Station to Nowhere

So much construction and reconstruction — and so many failures. There was the chicken-processing plant built in Iraq for $2.58 million that, except in a few Potemkin-Village-like moments, never plucked a chicken and sent it to market. There was the sparkling new, 64,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art, $25 million headquarters for the U.S. military in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, that doubled in cost as it was being built and that three generals tried to stop. They were overruled because Congress had already allotted the money for it, so why not spend it, even though it would never be used? And don't forget the $20 million that went into constructing roads and utilities for the base that was to hold it, or the$8.4 billion that went into Afghan opium-poppy-suppression and anti-drug programs and resulted in... bumper poppy crops and record opium yields, or the aid funds that somehow made their way directly into the hands of the Taliban (reputedly its second-largest funding source after those poppies).

There were the billions of dollars in aid that no one could account for, and a significant percentage of the 465,000 small arms (rifles, machine guns, grenade launchers, and the like) that the U.S. shipped to Afghanistan and simply lost track of. Most recently, there was the Task Force for Business Stability Operations, an $800-million Pentagon project to help jump-start the Afghan economy. It was shut down only six months ago and yet, in response to requests from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, the Pentagon swears that there are "no Defense Department personnel who can answer questions about" what the task force did with its money. As ProPublica's Megan McCloskey writes, "The Pentagon's claims are particularly surprising since Joseph Catalino, the former acting director of the task force who was with the program for two years, is still employed by the Pentagon as Senior Advisor for Special Operations and Combating Terrorism."

Still, from that pile of unaccountable taxpayer dollars, one nearly $43 million chunk did prove traceable to a single project: the building of a compressed natural gas station. (The cost of constructing a similar gas station in neighboring Pakistan: $300,000.) Located in an area that seems to have had no infrastructure for delivering natural gas and no cars converted for the use of such fuel, it represented the only example on record in those years of a gas station to nowhere.

All of this just scratches the surface when it comes to the piles of money that were poured into an increasingly privatized version of the American way of war and, in the form of overcharges and abuses of every sort, often simply disappeared into the pockets of the warrior corporations that entered America's war zones. In a sense, a surprising amount of the money that the Pentagon and U.S. civilian agencies "invested" in Iraq and Afghanistan never left the United States, since it went directly into the coffers of those companies.

Clearly, Washington had gone to war like a drunk on a bender, while the domestic infrastructure began to fray. At $109 billion by 2014, the American reconstruction program in Afghanistan was already, in today's dollars, larger than the Marshall Plan (which helped put all of devastated Western Europe back on its feet after World War II) and still the country was a shambles. In Iraq, a mere $60 billion was squandered on the failed rebuilding of the country. Keep in mind that none of this takes into account the staggering billions spent by the Pentagon in both countries to build strings of bases, ranging in size from American towns (with all the amenities of home) to tiny outposts. There would be 505 of them in Iraq and at least 550 in Afghanistan. Most were, in the end, abandoned, dismantled, or sometimes simply looted. And don't forget the vast quantities of fuel imported into Afghanistan to run the U.S. military machine in those years, some of which was siphoned off by American soldiers, to the tune of at least $15 million, and sold to local Afghans on the sly.

In other words, in the post-9/11 years, "reconstruction" and "war" have really been euphemisms for what, in other countries, we would recognize as a massive system of corruption.

And let's not forget another kind of "reconstruction" then underway. In both countries, the U.S. was creating enormous militaries and police forces essentially from scratch to the tune of at least $25 billion in Iraq and $65 billion in Afghanistan. What's striking about both of these security forces, once constructed, is how similar they turned out to be to those police academies, the unfinished schools, and that natural gas station. It can't be purely coincidental that both of the forces Americans proudly "stood up" have turned out to be the definition of corrupt: that is, they were filled not just with genuine recruits but with serried ranks of "ghost personnel."

In June 2014, after whole divisions of the Iraqi army collapsed and fled before modest numbers of Islamic State militants, abandoning much of their weaponry and equipment, it became clear that they had been significantly smaller in reality than on paper. And no wonder, as that army had enlisted 50,000 "ghost soldiers" (who existed only on paper and whose salaries were lining the pockets of commanders and others). In Afghanistan, the U.S. is still evidently helping to pay for similarly stunning numbers of phantom personnel, though no specific figures are available. (In 2009, an estimated more than 25% of the police force consisted of such ghosts.) As John Sopko, the U.S. inspector general for Afghanistan, warned last June: "We are paying a lot of money for ghosts in Afghanistan... whether they are ghost teachers, ghost doctors or ghost policeman or ghost soldiers."

And lest you imagine that the U.S. military has learned its lesson, rest assured that it's still quite capable of producing nonexistent proxy forces. Take the Pentagon-CIA program to train thousands of carefully vetted "moderate" Syrian rebels, equip them, arm them, and put them in the field to fight the Islamic State. Congress ponied up $500 million for it, $384 million of which was spent before that project was shut down as an abject failure. By then, less than 200 American-backed rebels had been trained and even less put into the field in Syria — and they were almost instantly kidnapped or killed, or they simply handed over their equipment to the al-Qaeda-linked al-Nusra Front. At one point, according to the congressional testimony of the top American commander in the Middle East, only four or five American-produced rebels were left "in the field." The cost-per-rebel sent into Syria, by the way, is now estimated at approximately $2 million.

A final footnote: the general who oversaw this program is, according to the New York Times, still a "rising star" in the Pentagon and in line for a promotion.

Profli-gate

You've just revisited the privatized, twenty-first-century version of the American way of war, which proved to be a smorgasbord of scandal, mismanagement, and corruption as far as the eye could see. In the tradition of Watergate, perhaps the whole system could be dubbed Profli-gate, since American war making across the Greater Middle East has represented perhaps the most profligate and least effective use of funds in the history of modern warfare. In fact, here's a word not usually associated with the U.S. military: the war system of this era seems to function remarkably like a monumental scam, a swindle, a fraud.

The evidence is in: the U.S. military can win battles, but not a war, not even against minimally armed minority insurgencies; it can "stand up" foreign militaries, but only if they are filled with phantom feet and if the forces themselves are as hollow as tombs; it can pour funds into the reconstruction of countries, a process guaranteed to leave them more prostrate than before; it can bomb, missile, and drone-kill significant numbers of terrorists and other enemies, even as their terror outfits and insurgent movements continue to grow stronger under the shadow of American air power. Fourteen years and five failed states later in the Greater Middle East, all of that seems irrefutable.

And here's something else irrefutable: amid the defeats, corruption, and disappointments, there lurks a kind of success. After all, every disaster in which the U.S. military takes part only brings more bounty to the Pentagon. Domestically, every failure results in calls for yet more military interventions around the world. As a result, the military is so much bigger and better funded than it was on September 10, 2001. The commanders who led our forces into such failures have repeatedly been rewarded and much of the top brass, civilian and military, though they should have retired in shame, have taken ever more golden parachutes into the lucrative worlds of defense contractors, lobbyists, and consultancies.


All of this couldn't be more obvious, though it's seldom said. In short, there turns out to be much good fortune in the disaster business, a fact which gives the whole process the look of a classic swindle in which the patsies lose their shirts but the scam artists make out like bandits.

Add in one more thing: these days, the only part of the state held in great esteem by conservatives and the present batch of Republican presidential candidates is the U.S. military. All of them, with the exception of Rand Paul, swear that on entering the Oval Office they will let that military loose, sending in more troops, or special ops forces, or air power, and funding the various services even more lavishly; all of this despite overwhelming evidence that the U.S. military is incapable of spending a dollar responsibly or effectively monitoring what it's done with the taxpayer funds in its possession. (If you don't believe me, forget everything in this piece and just check out the finances of the most expensive weapons system in history, the F-35 Lightning II, which should really be redubbed the F-35 Overrun for its madly spiraling costs.)

But no matter. If a system works (particularly for those in it), why change it? And by the way, in case you're looking for a genuine steal, I have a fabulous gas station in Afghanistan to sell you...


Source: It's a $cam! The American way of war in the twenty-first century

Result: Tattered countries like Libya, Iraq and Afghanistan

Result:
The criminally insane like ISIL running loose, when these scum should be heavily sedated and locked in a rubber room

Solution: Disband all military branches/NATO

Solution: Intelligence services look inward and spy on those governing to ensure they follow the law - if they take a bribe/payoff/peddle influence - life in jail - no parole

Solution: If military stays, revamp all international laws to strengthen cases for war crimes....no one walks anymore for heinous crimes and trashing societies...we must not cheat the hangman

_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Who benefits? Defense industry stocks soar after the Paris terror attacks

Quote:
It seemed that the whole world knew immediately after the attacks that more war was on its way(the perception at least is enough), and these rising stock values appear to substantiate the case. This week, various European countries, along with the United States, have promised more military action in the Middle East, despite the fact Western military intervention over the past decade created this mess to begin with.

Billions of dollars in tax money is spent every year so militaries can wage wars across the planet and there is an unspeakable amount of money to be made by the people who sell weapons and ammunition to countries at war. Arms dealers and weapons manufacturers never take sides, but are always happy to take billions of dollars from opposing nations in every war so they can destroy each other.

In fact, it could be argued that the financial incentive created by both the weapons industry and the plunder of foreign resources, is what drives governments to war to begin with. In fact, a recent study proved that resource-rich nations are 100 times more likely to have a foreign power intervene in their internal conflicts. There is a ton of money made in this industry, which is perhaps why people spread the popular myth that "war is good for the economy." However, it should be obvious this industry isn't good for anyone economically, aside from perhaps politicians and weapons manufacturers, as countless people are killed and untold damage is done to property — creating a situation where the economy will end up less profitable because less people are working, creating, and becoming entrepreneurs.

_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This may have been posted elsewhere/before. I post this for the information on the scheming schemers and rats behind the scenes - back then to the present day.


_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
stillsearchingtruth



Joined: 22 Jul 2014
Posts: 331

PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2015 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your posts only support the notion that this isn't really about America, merely it's about the parasitical elite using, then abusing then plundering.
That is after all what they are doing, wrecking it and then in turn setting fire to the empire from the inside.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2015 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The War You Don't See [Topic: Propaganda]


_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2016 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Video Shows Moment Iranian Forces Captured US Sailors

Staged non-existent event? -- I couldn't embed this video here. See link above.

Video has surfaced showing the moment Iranian forces captured U.S. sailors after their small patrol boats drifted into the country’s territorial waters in the Persian Gulf.

The American troops — and their pair of Riverine Command Boats — have since been released, but as the video shows, the ordeal wasn’t exactly a friendly offer of assistance.

What’s also interesting is the crew-served weapons aboard the fast-attack boats — the Swedish CB-90 design — appear to be visible in the video but missing in subsequent photos.





'We need more tools and methods to steal your money. Wars are an excellent way to do that!'

See: 'We have the last word here': Iranian Commander says missiles were readied to fire on US warship
Hate to break it to ya, but the S-300 Sunburn and the newer S-400's are the best anti ship missile ever built. They could sink an entire Navy in an afternoon. And being that the Persian Gulf is 100 miles wide and only 50 miles of it is navigable (the Iranian side); it would literally be like shooting fish in a barrel. If that happened, I would have to copy the sick, criminal, and perverted Israeli pastime of grabbing a lawn chair and watching the show.

The US should really go home and look into its crumbling: society, infrastructure, ghettos, unemployed, manufacturing sector, morals, corrupt government etc...and get out of other nation's affairs.

_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Southpark Fan



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 1413
Location: The Caribbean of Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hypocrisy and the war crimes go hand in hand. The US is the biggest war criminal; followed by the hand out, perverted, back stabbing, racist usury kingdom.

"The US sanctions against Iran's ballistic missile program ... have no legal or moral legitimacy," Reuters cited Ansari as saying in a televised news conference.

"America sells tens of billions of dollars of weaponry each year to countries in the region," Ansari said. "These weapons are used in war crimes against Palestinian, Lebanese and most recently Yemeni citizens."

Iran makes a great point here. The US is the country actually supporting terrorism, destabilizing nations and committing human rights abuses. The US is upset because Iran is interfering with this agenda.

The Foreign Ministry concluded by saying that they would not negotiate with the US on other issues, while sanctions introduced by the Washington, which Iran called "propaganda measures," would be met with a firm response.

"We will respond to such propaganda stunts and measures meant to harm [us], by more robustly pursuing our lawful missile program and promoting our defense capabilities and national security," the statement said, as cited by Press TV.

On Sunday, the US Treasury Department imposed sanctions on 11 companies and individuals for helping to supply Iran's ballistic missile program.

_________________
"Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth." - Buddha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Next Level Forum Index -> General Discussion All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
Page 7 of 10

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Theme xand created by spleen.