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Useful Eater



Joined: 25 Jan 2006
Posts: 114
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2006 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

George Bush mentioning the NWO on September 11 1991.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=-pVmL2RyYe4

Daddy Bush talking about it again..

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Rc7i0wCFf8g
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Ozregeneration



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 484
Location: Big Island Down Under

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greetings,

I've been doing a bit of a cleanup on my computer and came across these cards which were supposedly created in 1996. Don't know if it has been discussed before. What say ye.


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freedomfiles



Joined: 05 Feb 2007
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



Under Siege (1986)

Terrorists launch an attack against the USA. Their first strike is by a suicide squad that detonates a truckload of explosives at an army base in Washington DC. FBI probes indicate that the attack is by Arab terrorists led by Iranians. Subsequent attacks are via airplanes exploded in mid-air, crowded restaurants, and an attack on a mall. Administration cabinet heads push the President (Hal Holbrook) to retaliate. The director of the FBI (Peter Strauss) believes that there may be more to the story than the investigation has revealed and the Secretary of Defense (Paul Winfield) is the only other person urging caution.
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bri



Joined: 16 Jun 2006
Posts: 3185
Location: Capacious Creek

PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay I was watching this movie the other day. I thought this was WAAAAAAYYY too odd.

Go to 1:42



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVE81BHBD0E#
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rustyh



Joined: 17 Sep 2006
Posts: 489
Location: A Wonderful World

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bri.
help me out champ.
what was WAY asking too odd?
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bri



Joined: 16 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The part with the towers at 1:42. I'm not saying whoever made this movie was "in on it" or anything of that sort, but it looks like a form of pre-conditioning to me.
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krammer



Joined: 22 Jun 2006
Posts: 145

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think what bri is saying is that the scene at 1:42 is very very similar to the pictures we saw of people running from the debris cloud during the WTC collapse.

Kinda like this one..

[/img][/url]
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bri



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Touche'

I know it's water but it struck me as quite odd.
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freedomfiles



Joined: 05 Feb 2007
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Backgrounder on the "Under Siege" movie and Mid-East relations written back in 1986 :

Quote:
Under Siege: Focus on Arabs and Islam
Washington Report, February 24, 1986, Page 8
http://www.wrmea.com/backissues/022486/860224008.html

Arab American organizations focused their activity last month on efforts to stem the rising tide of anti-Arab harassment and vilification in this country. In testimony before a February 11 meeting of the U.S. Commission on Human Rights, American Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) National Chairman James Abourezk noted that Arab Americans have become "scapegoats for tensions and violence half a world away with which they have absolutely no connection" and that federal law enforcement authorities have been more interested in conducting surveillance of Arab Americans than investigating incidents of harassment and violence aimed at them. James Zogby, executive director of the Arab American Institute (AAI), testifying before the same body, charged that pro Israel groups such as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith (ADL) and the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) have contributed to "an atmosphere of exclusion and vilification" of Arab Americans and their organizations. [Both AIPAC and the ADL have published lists of individuals (including many unhyphenated Americans) and groups they consider "pro-PLO" and "anti-Israel." Militant Jewish groups have used these lists as well as lists of their own to target individuals for harassment and violent attack.]

At an ADC press conference following the hearing, former ADC regional director Bonnie Rimawi told reporters that, after her name appeared on a list titled "Enemies of Israel" in a New Jersey Jewish weekly, the New York ADC office became the target of such severe harassment that she was forced to close it down and resign in fear of her life.

Earlier in February, Arab American organizations spent a frantic and frustrating week trying to convince NBC executives to modify the network's made for TV movie Under Siege, which depicted a future United States nearly paralyzed by "Middle Eastern" terrorist attacks.

Ordinarily, Arab American groups are only able to respond to media anti-Arab stereotyping after the fact. Thanks to some vigilance on ADC's part, the case of Under Siege was different. When the first reports appeared last year that three Washington Post staffers Christian Williams, Richard Harwood and Bob Woodward would co write a teleplay on the possible effects of widespread terrorist attacks in the U.S., ADC sent a letter to the writers expressing the hope that they could tell the story without the aid of the customary "Arab as terrorist" stereotypes. The letter pointed out that, according to FBI reports, other ethnic groups, particularly militant Puerto Ricans and Jews, had committed more attacks in the U.S. than Arab groups had.

ADC's request apparently fell on deaf ears. The film's final script features a French Algerian named Abu Ladeen as a terrorist leader who orchestrates a series of bloody and spectacular attacks on targets in the U.S., while hiding out among Dearborn, Michigan's large Arabic speaking community. Abu Ladeen is caricatured as a scruffy, sweaty, dark haired, comicbook Muslim fond of talking tough and spouting nonsense like "You cannot meet my demands because I have none."

In the week before the film aired nationally, Detroit area Arab American leaders attended a preview at the local NBC affiliate. In a statement to the Washington Post, Don Unis, president of the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services, said: "It is unfortunate that they identified Dearborn. We felt that was very unnecessary. It will only inflame anti-Arab feelings that already exist in the city." AAI Executive Director James Zogby concurred, pointing out in a February 6 press release that "NBC has it all backwards. Dearborn Arab Americans are under siege today." Zogby went on to add that Dearborn Mayor Michael Guido had played on existing anti-Arab sentiment when he distributed a brochure during the last election campaign alleging that the city had a serious "Arab problem." As a further instance of renewed anti-Arab hysteria, he cited the recent call of Americans for a Sound Foreign Policy, a Washington based "hate group," for immediate government deportation of "Shiite terrorists in Detroit."

In an attempt to soften the harmful impact of the film, both the AAI release and ADC's February 7 press release called on NBC executives to add disclaimers or present panel discussions before or after the film. ADC's National Chairman James Abourezk asked that NBC air at the film's beginning and after each commercial break the message: "This film is fiction and is not meant to reflect adversely on the Muslim, Iranian or Arab American communities in the United States." [When The Godfather aired on television, the network ran a similar disclaimer in order to address the concerns of Italian-Americans.] Zogby said he had taken up these concerns personally with several NBC executives, but to no avail.

In the days before the the television premiere of Under Seige both the ADC and the National Association of Arab Americans (NAAA) were busy informing their networks of activists about the film and urging them to make their concerns known to NBC and local affiliates. When the film finally aired unchanged and without a disclaimer on February 9, over 100 protesters marched in an ADC sponsored demonstration in front of WRC-TV, NBC's Washington affiliate.

Although Under Seige did have scenes depicting the ugliness of anti-Arab and anti-Muslim passions that overtake some Americans in the wake of terrorist attacks, they were few in number, brief, and somehow disingenuous. Closer to the overall tone of the film was the overtly racist outburst of the fictional FBI director: "These people have their own mentality but we insist on dealing with them as if they were the same as us." Fortunately, most TV critics came down hard on the film, echoing the sentiments of Washington Post reviewer Tom Shales that Under Siege was "entertainingly awful at times, but virtually never quite convincing."

The very real concerns for the safety of the Arab American community were repeatedly expressed by ADC spokespersons interviewed on WRC's 11 o'clock news, immediately following the film.

—Anthony B. Toth

Anthony B. Toth, of Arlington, Virginia, is a freelance writer specializing in US. relations with the Middle East.
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freedomfiles



Joined: 05 Feb 2007
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Backgrounder on the "Under Siege" movie and Mid-East relations written back in 1986 :

Quote:
Under Siege: Focus on Arabs and Islam
Washington Report, February 24, 1986, Page 8
http://www.wrmea.com/backissues/022486/860224008.html

Arab American organizations focused their activity last month on efforts to stem the rising tide of anti-Arab harassment and vilification in this country. In testimony before a February 11 meeting of the U.S. Commission on Human Rights, American Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) National Chairman James Abourezk noted that Arab Americans have become "scapegoats for tensions and violence half a world away with which they have absolutely no connection" and that federal law enforcement authorities have been more interested in conducting surveillance of Arab Americans than investigating incidents of harassment and violence aimed at them. James Zogby, executive director of the Arab American Institute (AAI), testifying before the same body, charged that pro Israel groups such as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith (ADL) and the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) have contributed to "an atmosphere of exclusion and vilification" of Arab Americans and their organizations. [Both AIPAC and the ADL have published lists of individuals (including many unhyphenated Americans) and groups they consider "pro-PLO" and "anti-Israel." Militant Jewish groups have used these lists as well as lists of their own to target individuals for harassment and violent attack.]

At an ADC press conference following the hearing, former ADC regional director Bonnie Rimawi told reporters that, after her name appeared on a list titled "Enemies of Israel" in a New Jersey Jewish weekly, the New York ADC office became the target of such severe harassment that she was forced to close it down and resign in fear of her life.

Earlier in February, Arab American organizations spent a frantic and frustrating week trying to convince NBC executives to modify the network's made for TV movie Under Siege, which depicted a future United States nearly paralyzed by "Middle Eastern" terrorist attacks.

Ordinarily, Arab American groups are only able to respond to media anti-Arab stereotyping after the fact. Thanks to some vigilance on ADC's part, the case of Under Siege was different. When the first reports appeared last year that three Washington Post staffers Christian Williams, Richard Harwood and Bob Woodward would co write a teleplay on the possible effects of widespread terrorist attacks in the U.S., ADC sent a letter to the writers expressing the hope that they could tell the story without the aid of the customary "Arab as terrorist" stereotypes. The letter pointed out that, according to FBI reports, other ethnic groups, particularly militant Puerto Ricans and Jews, had committed more attacks in the U.S. than Arab groups had.

ADC's request apparently fell on deaf ears. The film's final script features a French Algerian named Abu Ladeen as a terrorist leader who orchestrates a series of bloody and spectacular attacks on targets in the U.S., while hiding out among Dearborn, Michigan's large Arabic speaking community. Abu Ladeen is caricatured as a scruffy, sweaty, dark haired, comicbook Muslim fond of talking tough and spouting nonsense like "You cannot meet my demands because I have none."

In the week before the film aired nationally, Detroit area Arab American leaders attended a preview at the local NBC affiliate. In a statement to the Washington Post, Don Unis, president of the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services, said: "It is unfortunate that they identified Dearborn. We felt that was very unnecessary. It will only inflame anti-Arab feelings that already exist in the city." AAI Executive Director James Zogby concurred, pointing out in a February 6 press release that "NBC has it all backwards. Dearborn Arab Americans are under siege today." Zogby went on to add that Dearborn Mayor Michael Guido had played on existing anti-Arab sentiment when he distributed a brochure during the last election campaign alleging that the city had a serious "Arab problem." As a further instance of renewed anti-Arab hysteria, he cited the recent call of Americans for a Sound Foreign Policy, a Washington based "hate group," for immediate government deportation of "Shiite terrorists in Detroit."

In an attempt to soften the harmful impact of the film, both the AAI release and ADC's February 7 press release called on NBC executives to add disclaimers or present panel discussions before or after the film. ADC's National Chairman James Abourezk asked that NBC air at the film's beginning and after each commercial break the message: "This film is fiction and is not meant to reflect adversely on the Muslim, Iranian or Arab American communities in the United States." [When The Godfather aired on television, the network ran a similar disclaimer in order to address the concerns of Italian-Americans.] Zogby said he had taken up these concerns personally with several NBC executives, but to no avail.

In the days before the the television premiere of Under Seige both the ADC and the National Association of Arab Americans (NAAA) were busy informing their networks of activists about the film and urging them to make their concerns known to NBC and local affiliates. When the film finally aired unchanged and without a disclaimer on February 9, over 100 protesters marched in an ADC sponsored demonstration in front of WRC-TV, NBC's Washington affiliate.

Although Under Seige did have scenes depicting the ugliness of anti-Arab and anti-Muslim passions that overtake some Americans in the wake of terrorist attacks, they were few in number, brief, and somehow disingenuous. Closer to the overall tone of the film was the overtly racist outburst of the fictional FBI director: "These people have their own mentality but we insist on dealing with them as if they were the same as us." Fortunately, most TV critics came down hard on the film, echoing the sentiments of Washington Post reviewer Tom Shales that Under Siege was "entertainingly awful at times, but virtually never quite convincing."

The very real concerns for the safety of the Arab American community were repeatedly expressed by ADC spokespersons interviewed on WRC's 11 o'clock news, immediately following the film.

—Anthony B. Toth

Anthony B. Toth, of Arlington, Virginia, is a freelance writer specializing in US. relations with the Middle East.
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freedomfiles



Joined: 05 Feb 2007
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Backgrounder on the "Under Siege" movie and Mid-East relations written back in 1986 :

Quote:
Under Siege: Focus on Arabs and Islam
Washington Report, February 24, 1986, Page 8
http://www.wrmea.com/backissues/022486/860224008.html

Arab American organizations focused their activity last month on efforts to stem the rising tide of anti-Arab harassment and vilification in this country. In testimony before a February 11 meeting of the U.S. Commission on Human Rights, American Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) National Chairman James Abourezk noted that Arab Americans have become "scapegoats for tensions and violence half a world away with which they have absolutely no connection" and that federal law enforcement authorities have been more interested in conducting surveillance of Arab Americans than investigating incidents of harassment and violence aimed at them. James Zogby, executive director of the Arab American Institute (AAI), testifying before the same body, charged that pro Israel groups such as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith (ADL) and the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) have contributed to "an atmosphere of exclusion and vilification" of Arab Americans and their organizations. [Both AIPAC and the ADL have published lists of individuals (including many unhyphenated Americans) and groups they consider "pro-PLO" and "anti-Israel." Militant Jewish groups have used these lists as well as lists of their own to target individuals for harassment and violent attack.]

At an ADC press conference following the hearing, former ADC regional director Bonnie Rimawi told reporters that, after her name appeared on a list titled "Enemies of Israel" in a New Jersey Jewish weekly, the New York ADC office became the target of such severe harassment that she was forced to close it down and resign in fear of her life.

Earlier in February, Arab American organizations spent a frantic and frustrating week trying to convince NBC executives to modify the network's made for TV movie Under Siege, which depicted a future United States nearly paralyzed by "Middle Eastern" terrorist attacks.

Ordinarily, Arab American groups are only able to respond to media anti-Arab stereotyping after the fact. Thanks to some vigilance on ADC's part, the case of Under Siege was different. When the first reports appeared last year that three Washington Post staffers Christian Williams, Richard Harwood and Bob Woodward would co write a teleplay on the possible effects of widespread terrorist attacks in the U.S., ADC sent a letter to the writers expressing the hope that they could tell the story without the aid of the customary "Arab as terrorist" stereotypes. The letter pointed out that, according to FBI reports, other ethnic groups, particularly militant Puerto Ricans and Jews, had committed more attacks in the U.S. than Arab groups had.

ADC's request apparently fell on deaf ears. The film's final script features a French Algerian named Abu Ladeen as a terrorist leader who orchestrates a series of bloody and spectacular attacks on targets in the U.S., while hiding out among Dearborn, Michigan's large Arabic speaking community. Abu Ladeen is caricatured as a scruffy, sweaty, dark haired, comicbook Muslim fond of talking tough and spouting nonsense like "You cannot meet my demands because I have none."

In the week before the film aired nationally, Detroit area Arab American leaders attended a preview at the local NBC affiliate. In a statement to the Washington Post, Don Unis, president of the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services, said: "It is unfortunate that they identified Dearborn. We felt that was very unnecessary. It will only inflame anti-Arab feelings that already exist in the city." AAI Executive Director James Zogby concurred, pointing out in a February 6 press release that "NBC has it all backwards. Dearborn Arab Americans are under siege today." Zogby went on to add that Dearborn Mayor Michael Guido had played on existing anti-Arab sentiment when he distributed a brochure during the last election campaign alleging that the city had a serious "Arab problem." As a further instance of renewed anti-Arab hysteria, he cited the recent call of Americans for a Sound Foreign Policy, a Washington based "hate group," for immediate government deportation of "Shiite terrorists in Detroit."

In an attempt to soften the harmful impact of the film, both the AAI release and ADC's February 7 press release called on NBC executives to add disclaimers or present panel discussions before or after the film. ADC's National Chairman James Abourezk asked that NBC air at the film's beginning and after each commercial break the message: "This film is fiction and is not meant to reflect adversely on the Muslim, Iranian or Arab American communities in the United States." [When The Godfather aired on television, the network ran a similar disclaimer in order to address the concerns of Italian-Americans.] Zogby said he had taken up these concerns personally with several NBC executives, but to no avail.

In the days before the the television premiere of Under Seige both the ADC and the National Association of Arab Americans (NAAA) were busy informing their networks of activists about the film and urging them to make their concerns known to NBC and local affiliates. When the film finally aired unchanged and without a disclaimer on February 9, over 100 protesters marched in an ADC sponsored demonstration in front of WRC-TV, NBC's Washington affiliate.

Although Under Seige did have scenes depicting the ugliness of anti-Arab and anti-Muslim passions that overtake some Americans in the wake of terrorist attacks, they were few in number, brief, and somehow disingenuous. Closer to the overall tone of the film was the overtly racist outburst of the fictional FBI director: "These people have their own mentality but we insist on dealing with them as if they were the same as us." Fortunately, most TV critics came down hard on the film, echoing the sentiments of Washington Post reviewer Tom Shales that Under Siege was "entertainingly awful at times, but virtually never quite convincing."

The very real concerns for the safety of the Arab American community were repeatedly expressed by ADC spokespersons interviewed on WRC's 11 o'clock news, immediately following the film.

—Anthony B. Toth

Anthony B. Toth, of Arlington, Virginia, is a freelance writer specializing in US. relations with the Middle East.

Moslems Are Fearful Of Racial Stereotypes
February 25, 1986
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A0DE7D91F3AF936A15751C0A960948260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=print

To the Editor:

The Sunday Night NBC Movie on Feb. 9, ''Under Siege,'' is an example of the misunderstanding of cultural sensitivities in our pluralistic society. It, unfortunately, reflects the media's lack of knowledge about Islam.

Moreover, the movie's portrayal of Abu Ladeen and some of his followers as devout Moslems operating a terrorist network in the United States could excite the worst possible fears and apprehensions in the American people.

There is not an iota of evidence to suggest that Moslems in North America have been involved, directly or indirectly, in any terrorist activity. On the contrary, we have been the repeated victims of terrorism in the recent past. At least 10 Islamic centers and mosques in the United States have been vandalized in the last six months.

We fear that such movies could incite some individuals to acts of aggression against innocent individuals. Therefore, in the future, we urge a more balanced portrayal of Moslems in North America as the honest, hard-working contributors to society they really are. IQBAL J. UNUS Secretary General The Islamic Society of North America Plainfield, Ind., Feb. 13, 1986


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freedomfiles



Joined: 05 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

apologies for the double postings, website was hanging when i submitted the article. is it not possible to edit/delete my replies ?
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