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PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Being killed with a single shot from a silenced weapon from a car alongside in a traffic jam is surely a fishy way to be assassinated, though?
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NATO Civil-Military Fusion Centre Counter-Narcotics in Afghanistan Report August 2012
September 7, 2012 | Public Intelligence


'Despite the continuous counter-narcotics efforts of the international community and the Afghan government throughout the past decade, Agence France-Presse wrote in April 2012 that Afghanistan continues to be a major contributor to the global drug supply. Approximately 90% of the world’s opium, most of which is processed into heroin, originates in Afghan fields. While potential opium production in Afghanistan peaked in 2007, poppy cultivation has recently risen. For instance, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) marked a 61% increase in the potential opium production between 2010 and 2011. A separate UNODC report from 2010 states that drugs and bribes are equivalent to approximately a quarter of Afghanistan’s gross domestic product (GDP).

Dynamics & Motivations. Price fluctuations influence market dynamics, according to the UNODC. For instance, the rise in poppy cultivation between 2005 and 2009 translated into an increase in supply, which in turn helped to bring about the gradual decrease in the price of opium. Similarly, a decline in the amount of opium poppies produced in 2009-2010 contributed to rising poppy values and greater cultivation in 2011. Other factors are also reportedly at play. For instance, a World Bank report on “Drugs and Development in Afghanistan” says that poppies are attractive to some farmers because “there is working capital financing available at all stages, as well as credit and other inputs for producers.” The same report notes that many poorer households are obligated to grow poppies by landowners and creditors to enable them to pay off debts. The Institute for War and Peace Reporting further indicates that many Afghan farmers are in fact compelled to grow this crop by insurgent elements through threats and intimidation...'

Report (PDF): Counter-Narcotics in Afghanistan August 2012

Who really benefits? Some 13th century warlords, MI6 (Lords of the drug trade) and the US. Apparently, there is a 10 yr supply now wharehoused somewhere.

The PDF report has some useful info. The propaganda filled article, states the Taliban benefit. They are hardcore anti drug. Infact they almost eradicated poppy cultivation before 9/11 and the subsequent war crime invasion. In 2000, the Taliban government banned poppy cultivation, which led to a 96 percent reduction in acreage devoted to the crop in last years growing season, according to UN and US drug agencies.


Credit: Public Intelligence

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that SouthparkFan.

The PDF is rich in detail if you read thru the spin.

And sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words.

Your poppy cultivation graph above for 2001 says it all.

And even a linked propaganda report admits:

Quote:
When U.S.-led forces invaded Afghanistan in October 2001, the Taliban’s ban
on poppy cultivation had been in force for fifteen months, and there were
virtually no poppy fields across the Afghan south.....

It was the largest cutback in illicit drug production in Afganistan or
any other nation
in a single year.

http://www.usip.org/files/resources/taliban_opium_1.pdf

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote




U.S. Defeated In Afghanistan
Ending of Joint NATO-Afghan Patrols
Destroys US Plan for a "Handover."


by Fintan Dunne, 18 Sept., 2012

The loss of over 50 NATO troops this year in attacks by insurgents in
Afghan forces uniform has forced the US to declare that joint NATO-Afghan
patrols are at an end --turning the so-called "exit plan into a rout."


The proclaimed strategy of a handover to Afghan security forces has now
been scuppered by the Taliban's well orchestrated embedding of "moles"
within the Afghan security structures.

The "enemy within" problem has now become an operational nightmare
of such magnitude that it has turned US handover plans into a raw defeat.


The end of joint patrols is precisely the outcome desired by war tacticians
in the the insurgency.

It means that, in effect, occupation forces now face two enemies in
Afghanistan. The insurgency and the Afghan security forces. With
the line distinguishing the two enemies now so blurred that they are one.

The insurgent tactic will be seen in history as a brilliant maximization of
leverage. A few hundred "moles" have crippled into defeat a force of
hundreds of thousands.

It will only get worse. As NATO withdraws, Afghan security forces will
hemorrhage further. The "moles" within will see to that.

For the US, Iraq was an exit.

Afghanistan is now a clear and deteriorating US defeat.


Today's policy change is already being spun by NATO and by politicians
as only "temporary" and "limited," but the announcement by US/NATO
commander General John Allen, is an effective admission of that defeat.

Quote:
Nato Afghan strategy in disarray after joint ground operations suspended
Defence secretary called to the Commons after US general suspends joint patrols with Afghan troops

Chris McGreal, Washington, Emma Graham-Harrison in Kabul, and
Haroon Siddique - guardian.co.uk, Tue 18 September 2012 12.02 BST



The Nato-led military strategy in Afghanistan has been thrown into disarray after joint on-the-ground operations were suspended because of a collapse in trust over the killings of Americans and other Nato soldiers by Afghan government forces.

The move came after a surge in the number of "insider attacks" by Afghan government soldiers and police officers. There have been 36 such attacks this year, which have killed 51 Nato soldiers. The suspension threatens the joint plan to train an effective Afghan army to keep the Taliban at bay after foreign troops pull out.

General John Allen, the US and Nato commander in Afghanistan, ordered a stop to joint combat operations and patrols "until further notice".

The decision, which was announced in Washington, took the UK government by surprise, coming just a day after the defence secretary, Philip Hammond, spoke in defence of Nato's continued work with Afghan troops in parliament. Whitehall sources said British commanders were unaware the announcement was going to be made.

He said on Monday: "It is essential that we complete the task of training the Afghan national security forces and increasing their capability so that they can take over the burden of combat as we withdraw. That is what we intend to do, and we will not be deterred from it by these attacks."

Hammond will be forced to address the Commons on Afghanistan for a second day in succession on Tuesday after the Speaker, John Bercow, granted Tory MP John Baron an urgent question at lunchtime.

A Ministry of Defence source said everything the British army did in Afghanistan was in partnership with Afghans so it would have to look closely at how to continue operations while complying with the direction from the Nato-led International Security Assistance Force (Isaf).

The source said: "We are very much partnered with the Afghans. Literally everything is partnered with them right down to every level. We need to see what are the parameters for us … it's for the individual countries working under Isaf to determine how they work through what Isaf wants to be done."

The chief US military officer, General Martin Dempsey, said the "insider attacks", in which four American and two British soldiers were killed at the weekend, were themselves "a very serious threat to the campaign" against the Taliban.

There were at least 12 such attacks last month alone, leaving 15 dead.


Nato said in a statement that "most partnering and advising" would now be at a battalion level and above, a significant withdrawal by Nato forces from working with the Afghan military on the ground.

Joint operations at a lower level would be "evaluated on a case by case basis" and only happen with the approval of regional commanders.

Nato said in some places all on-the-ground collaboration would cease and foreign military advisers would be "stepping back to advise from the next level".

The US defence secretary, Leon Panetta, described the attacks as the "last gasp" of a weakened Taliban. But the admission that Nato troops are no longer safe from the forces they are relying on to contain the Taliban after the final US pullout in two years' time is a severe blow to Washington's plans.

Under the strategy, members of the 350,000-strong Afghan security forces gain experience patrolling and fighting alongside US and other foreign soldiers. But the killings have led to a collapse in trust.

American, British and Afghan officials became increasingly alarmed at the attacks because of their impact on troop morale and public opinion in the US and UK.

The decision strikes at the heart of Nato – and British – strategy which is based on the assumption that foreign troops and Afghan security forces will work increasingly closely until the Afghans take over all ground combat operations by the end of 2014.

Douglas Alexander, the shadow foreign secretary, asked why Hammond made no mention of the move when he faced MPs in the Commons on Monday in response to an urgent question from former Labour minister Denis MacShane. He said there were "very serious questions" for the government to answer.

Alexander told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "This announcement begs more questions than it answers. Why did Philip Hammond not even mention it yesterday when he addressed MPs in the House of Commons? Was it that he didn't know or did he choose not to tell MPs? But sitting beyond that question is the deeper question: does this represent a temporary tactical response by military commanders on the ground or does it represent a more strategic shift in the mission?

"If we are in a position where a regional commander is generally unwilling to grant the authority for troops to go out on patrol with Afghan soldiers, that would severely compromise the capacity of the mission to deliver its objectives."

He went on: "The whole of the strategy in Afghanistan now is built around the premise that as the international forces step back, the Afghan forces can step up.

"That's why I think there are very serious questions for the government to answer in the hours ahead."

Though British commanders were drawing up plans designed to better protect their troops against "insider" or "green on blue" attacks, defence officials are making clear that the Nato decision to suspend joint ground operations was unexpected.

Hammond told the House of Commons on Monday that the latest attacks, including the killing of two British soldiers from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment on Saturday, could not be allowed to "derail" the training of Afghan security forces by British troops.

The Nato decision has driven a coach and horses through that plan, and raises a huge question mark over the manner in which the 9,000 British troops in Helmand will be reduced over the next two and a quarter years.

Hammond confirmed to MPs on Monday his remarks in an interview with the Guardian last week that his military commanders had advised that UK troops could withdraw faster than planned – a reversal of recent military advice. That advice may change again.

Hammond discussed the attacks with the Afghan president, Hamid Karzai, on a visit to Kabul last week, saying the problem was a huge concern and had to be "put back in its box".

American officials say the insider attacks are carried out by a mixture of Taliban infiltrators dressed as soldiers, insurgents who have got themselves recruited and Afghan soldiers angry about their treatment, personal insults or cultural differences.

US commanders had already assigned soldiers to guard their comrades as they slept, ate or interacted with Afghan forces because of the increasing number of insider killings. American troops were also ordered to carry loaded weapons at all times, even inside their own bases.

Afghan civilian deaths caused by Nato attacks have added to the strain. In the latest, an air strike killed eight women and girls collecting firewood.


The loss of trust in the force the US is relying on to prevent the Taliban retaking control of Afghanistan compounds other concerns about Washington's strategy.

The additional 33,000 soldiers Barack Obama, dispatched two years ago as part of the surge are expected to complete their withdrawal this week. The remaining 68,000 American troops are supposed to gradually shift responsibility to Afghan forces, which, under the US strategy, are to take the lead in combat as early as next year.

But despite gains on the battlefield, questions persist about whether Afghan forces will have the ability and will to keep an undefeated Taliban at bay once Nato forces have left.

Colonel Tim Collins, a former commanding officer in the Royal Irish Regiment, said Allen had taken a sensible decision to reduce the risk to his troops.

He told the Today programme: "Because of the recent upsurge of protest across the Islamic world, amongst Muslims in general, the risk to his troops at this point is such that this is the time to decide to take the train wheels off and let them go on their own."

Collins said there was no evidence that the Taliban had a strategy in play. "There is no evidence to support that," he said. "The Taliban are taking advantage of disgruntled Afghans who have been recruited in large numbers – many of them far too quickly. This has turned into a copycat thing. To credit the Taliban with a tactic is to become what Lenin would describe as a useful idiot."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/sep/18/nato-scales-back-operations-afghans

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Last edited by Fintan on Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:42 pm; edited 3 times in total
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Earlier Today:

Quote:
A suicide bomb attack in the Afghan capital Kabul, has killed nine
foreigners and three Afghans.





10 Days Ago:

Quote:
A suicide bomber has blown himself up near Nato's headquarters
in Kabul, killing at least six children, according to police in Afghanistan.





17 Days Ago:

Quote:
A twin suicide bombing near a Nato base in central Afghanistan
has killed at least nine civilians and four policemen, officials say.





30 Days Ago:

Quote:
Multiple suicide attacks leave dozens dead.
In the southern province of Nimroz, suicide bombers carried out multiple
attacks in the capital - at least 27 people were killed. Another explosion hit
a district in Kunduz Province, killing at least 10. And in Badakshan, Taliban
fighters carried out an ambush and killed a district government chief and
three policemen.



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PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2012 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

US military deaths in Afghanistan reach 2,000
The Associated Press | Sep 30, 2012 | CBC


'Death toll climbs as "insider attacks" by Afghan army, police become more common.'

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:


U.S. Defeated In Afghanistan
Ending of Joint NATO-Afghan Patrols
Destroys US Plan for a "Handover."


by Fintan Dunne, 18 Sept., 2012

The loss of over 50 NATO troops this year in attacks by insurgents in
Afghan forces uniform has forced the US to declare that joint NATO-Afghan
patrols are at an end --turning the so-called "exit plan into a rout."


READ MORE: http://breakfornews.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=78472#78472


And as we pass that 2,000 US Troops killed milestone.....

Now comes confirmation of the US/NATO defeat - which
we reported in this thread above - two weeks ago.

The significance of the abandoning of joint US-Afghan forces patrols --
pointed to by the Secretary General of NATO himself!

And you hardly even have to read between the lines Neutral

Quote:


NATO Withdrawal from Afghanistan
could come early, says Rasmussen


Exclusive: Anders Fogh Rasmussen admits 'green on blue'
attacks have hit morale, and raises prospect of pullout before 2014

In Traynor in Brussels - The Guardian, Monday 1 October 2012 19.15 BST

The retreat of western forces from Afghanistan could come sooner than
expected, the head of Nato has said, as he conceded the recent Taliban
strategy of "green on blue" killings had been successful in sapping western
morale.


In an interview with the Guardian, the Nato secretary-general Anders Fogh
Rasmussen responded to growing pressure for a faster withdrawal from
Afghanistan by stating that the options were being studied and should be
clear within three months.

"From now until the end of 2014 you may see adaptation of our presence.
Our troops can redeploy, take on other tasks, or even withdraw, or we can
reduce the number of foreign troops," he said. "From now until the end of
2014 we will see announcements of redeployments, withdrawals or
drawdown … If the security situation allows, I would not exclude the
possibility that in certain areas you could accelerate the process."

Rasmussen admitted that the killings of almost 50 allied troops this year in
"green on blue" attacks – Afghan security forces turning on their trainers
and mentors – had damaged the relationship between the international
forces and the Afghan police and military.

"There's no doubt insider attacks have undermined trust and confidence,
absolutely," he said.



Nato aims to have an Afghan security force of 352,000 taking over
responsibility for the country in just over two years' time when the US-led
combat operations are scheduled to end.


Amid argument among analysts as to what has been behind the stream of
"green on blue" attacks, Nato officers on the ground are reported to have
ascribed them mainly to disgruntled and embittered Afghan security forces
with grudges against their western mentors.

While Rasmussen conceded there may have been some such cases, Nato
has clearly concluded from intelligence that the attacks have more to do
with a clever Taliban strategy of infiltration of the Afghan security
structures aimed at sowing distrust and confusion, and that is shaping
western public opinion.

"It's safe to say that a significant part of the insider attacks are due to
Taliban tactics … Probably it is part of a Taliban strategy," he said.


While it was allied soldiers who were being killed, Rasmussen said the
Taliban campaign's ultimate target was to turn western public opinion
against the war.

"Political leaders in the capitals of troop-contributing countries know very
well that this is part of a tactic or strategy to also undermine public and
political support at home … The real target is politicians, media, opinion-
formers at home in partner nations and allied nations."

He added that some of the killings had been carried out by Taliban
infiltrators disguised as Afghan police or soldiers.

"We have seen also where they were in Afghan uniforms though they are
not members of the Afghan security force."

On the pace and phasing of withdrawal – the difficult task of pulling out
more than 120,000 troops from forbidding and frequently hostile terrain –
Rasmussen said a key moment would come later this year when General
John Allen, the US overall commander of the operations, delivered a
report with his military recommendations.

"Political decisions will be taken based on his recommendations as to how
we will adapt to the transfer of lead responsibility to the Afghans," he said.
"The pace will very much depend on the security situation on the ground."

Rasmussen stressed that any accelerated rate of withdrawal should not be
seen as "a race for the exits". The end of combat operations is to be
followed from 2015 by a Nato-led training mission for the Afghan security
forces, which will also require the continued deployment of fighting units or
special forces – "enablers" as they are called in military jargon.

"The core will be a training mission. Of course, we will have to ensure that
our trainers can operate in a secure environment so we need capabilities
to make sure that our trainers can operate," said the former Danish prime
minister, appointed head of Nato in 2009.

Additionally, there will be further US forces remaining in Afghanistan under
a bilateral "strategic partnership" deal struck between Washington and
Kabul.

Amid mission creep fatigue across Europe, squeezed defence budgets
and sweeping austerity cuts, it is not clear how many of the European
Nato allies will contribute troops to the training mission. Defence
ministers meet next week in Brussels to start planning the operations.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NATO rejects UN report on death of Afghan children
KIM GAMEL | Fri, Feb 8, 2013 | Associated Press


'KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The U.S.-led international coalition on Friday rejected a U.N. rights group's concern about reports that U.S. military strikes have killed hundreds of children in Afghanistan during the past four years, saying they are "categorically unfounded."


Photo: Undated handout image shows an unmanned aircraft firing missiles
Credit: Reuters


The statement by the International Security Assistance Force came a day after the Geneva-based U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child said the casualties were "due notably to reported lack of precautionary measures and indiscriminate use of force."


Photo: Children killed by drone strike

The coalition also dismissed that claim, saying that it takes special care to avoid civilian casualties. The coalition said the number of children who died or were wounded from air operations dropped by nearly 40 percent in 2012 compared with the year before, although it did not give specific figures.


Photo: As the UK’s news agency, The Telegraph, reports on August 11, 2011, that 2,293 people have
been killed by US drone missiles, with as many as 775 of those being innocent civilian casualties – 168
of them being children.
Credit: A New day


The U.N. was reviewing a range of U.S. policies affecting children for the first time since 2008. The release of the report coincides with an intensifying debate in Washington over U.S. policy on drone targeting and airstrikes.


Photo: Hillary Clinton holds a small US-made drone that the Ugandan military uses in Somalia to fight al-Qaeda linked militants
Credit: Salon


CIA Director-designate John Brennan faced a Senate Intelligence Committee confirmation hearing on Thursday. His defense of drone strikes to kill terror suspects, including Americans, is causing key lawmakers to consider lifting secrecy from what has become an important weapon in the fight against al-Qaida.


Photo: US terror drone strike kills 24 in SW Somalia (October 14, 2012)
Credit: Pan-African news Wire


In its report, the U.N. committee told the United States to "take concrete and firm precautionary measures and prevent indiscriminate use of force to ensure that no further killings and maiming of civilians, including children, take place." Human rights and civil liberties groups applauded the findings. The U.N. committee referred to "hundreds" of children killed since 2008 and expressed alarm that the figure had "doubled from 2010 to 2011."

It didn't provide specific numbers, but a report to the U.N. Security Council last April by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's special representative for Children and Armed Conflict said the number of child casualties blamed on airstrikes conducted by international and allied Afghan forces doubled compared with the last reporting period, with 110 children killed and 68 injured in 2011.'

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With Bags of Cash, C.I.A. Seeks Influence in Afghanistan
MATTHEW ROSENBERG | April 28, 2013 | NY Times


'For more than a decade, wads of American dollars packed into suitcases, backpacks and, on occasion, plastic shopping bags have been dropped off every month or so at the offices of Afghanistan’s president — courtesy of the Central Intelligence Agency.

All told, tens of millions of dollars have flowed from the C.I.A. to the office of President Hamid Karzai, according to current and former advisers to the Afghan leader.

The CIA and MI6 have regularly given large cash payments to Hamid Karzai's office with the aim of maintaining access to the Afghan leader and his top allies and officials, but the attempt to buy influence has largely failed and may have backfired, former diplomats and policy analysts say.

The Guardian understands that the payments by British intelligence were on a smaller scale than the CIA's handouts, reported in the New York Times to have been in the tens of millions, and much of the British money has gone towards attempts to finance peace initiatives, which have so far proved abortive.

That failure has raised questions among some British officials over whether eagerness to promote a political settlement may have been exploited by Afghan officials and self-styled intermediaries for the Taliban.

Responding to the allegations while on a visit to Helsinki on Monday, Karzai said his national security council (NSC) had received support from the US government for the past 10 years, and the amounts involved were "not big" and were used for a variety of purposes including helping those wounded in the conflict. "It's multi-purpose assistance," he said, without commenting on the allegations that the money was fuelling corruption.'

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PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
8 Soldiers Die in Attacks in Afghanistan

By ALISSA J. RUBIN - May 4, 2013 - NY Times

KABUL, Afghanistan — Eight soldiers with the American-led military coalition
were killed Saturday, making it the bloodiest day this year for Western troops
fighting here.

Two were shot in an insider attack, one died in a small-arms attack and
five Americans were killed when their vehicle struck a roadside bomb
,
according to statements from the International Security Assistance Force
and Afghan officials....

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/05/world/asia/blast-kills-7-soldiers-in-afghanistan.html?_r=0

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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2013 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crisis deepens for US occupation in Afghanistan
Patrick Martin | 6 May 2013 | WSW


'Both the US-NATO occupation and the stooge regime of President Hamid Karzai are widely hated by the Afghan population. Resistance to foreign intervention and occupation is at the heart of the guerrilla warfare that more than a decade of relentless military offensives, air strikes and assassinations have been unable to suppress.

Karzai himself confirmed the completely venal character of his own government, acknowledging at a press conference Saturday, the same day as the eight deaths among the occupation forces, that his office received regular cash payments from the US Central Intelligence Agency.

These payments—an open secret in Kabul, but concealed from the American population by the corporate-controlled media—were made public in the US last week in a report in the New York Times. Karzai not only admitted that blocks of cash had been dropped off at his office; he said that he had met earlier in the day with the CIA station chief in Kabul to ensure that the payments would continue.

Karzai said he told the station chief: “Because of all these rumors in the media, please do not cut all this money because we really need it. We want to continue this sort of assistance.” He said the US official promised to continue making the payoffs.

The Times account portrayed the cash payments as a slush fund for bribing Afghan warlords to remain loyal to the Karzai government, citing such notorious mass murderers as Abdul Rashid Dostum, who has long dominated the Uzbek-speaking region around Mazar-e Sharif in western Afghanistan.

But there is another, equally important, purpose for the cash handouts. For more than a decade, top Afghan officials have been salting away money in countries with permissive banking regimes, like the Persian Gulf financial capital Dubai, in anticipation of the day when the US-backed regime would crumble, the insurgents would march into Kabul, and they would go into a well-paid exile.

Karzai suggested that he would be demanding even more cash from Washington as the price for a US-Afghan bilateral security agreement to set the conditions for a continued US-NATO military presence after 2014, when the bulk of US combat forces are to be withdrawn.

Similar talks in Iraq collapsed when the Iraqi government declared that popular opposition blocked it from offering any form of legal immunity for US soldiers deployed in the country. Obama, like Bush before him, had insisted that American troops could not be prosecuted under Iraqi law, no matter what crimes they might commit against Iraqi citizens, making a mockery of the claims that Iraq was a sovereign nation, not a conquered and occupied country. Ultimately, all US troops except for security forces at the huge US embassy in Baghdad were pulled out.

Such a result is not expected for the talks in Afghanistan, since Karzai and his fellow puppets are convinced that without US-NATO forces in Kabul, they could end up hanging from lampposts.

But Karzai & Co. still want to fatten their own bank accounts while they put off any day of reckoning with the Afghan insurgents. Karzai told the news conference that he was ready to sign a deal as long as the American government paid a sufficiently high rent for the bases it will use on Afghan territory after 2014, as well as providing additional funding for the training and equipping of Afghan security forces.

According to one press account, “The Afghan government has not said how much rent it would want for three or four US bases, but it is believed to be in the billions.” Needless to say, these sums would flow rapidly out of Afghanistan into the bank accounts of Afghan officials in Dubai, Switzerland, the Cayman Islands or other offshore financial centers where few questions are asked of large new depositors.

The other condition set by Karzai was that any long-term security agreement with the United States guarantee Afghanistan’s borders against “neighboring countries,” in what appeared to be a reference to Pakistan. Last week, Afghan troops attacked a Pakistani army outpost that Afghan officials claimed was on their territory.'

Related: Pakistan staggers toward elections amid civil war and impending economic collapse

Related: MI6 'handing bundles of cash to Hamid Karzai'

Related: The CIA's bag man was Muhammad Zia Salehi

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PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Karzai reveals US plan for permanent Afghanistan bases
Bill Van Auken | 11 May 2013 | WSW


It is funny how terms like Freedom, Democracy yada yada are used here and Iraq - and the scum bag Karzai is still in power after 12 years.

'Afghan President Hamid Karzai Thursday revealed that Washington wants to maintain nine US military bases scattered across the country after the formal deadline for the withdrawal of US and NATO coalition forces at the end of 2014.

In a speech delivered at Kabul University, Karzai stressed that he was amenable to the US demand, indicating that he was willing to trade the bases for promises of a continued flow of economic aid from the West and security for his puppet government. Another likely condition is US support for the election of his handpicked successor in an election set for next year.

“If these conditions are met, we are ready to sign the contract with the United States,” he said. As to the continued presence of foreign troops on Afghan soil after more than a dozen years of war and occupation, Karzai stated, “We see their staying in Afghanistan beyond 2014 in the interests of Afghanistan as well as NATO.”

The statements represented an abrupt rhetorical shift by the US-backed president. In recent months, Karzai has accused Washington of colluding with the Taliban to increase violence and create a pretext for a continued US military presence. He has repeatedly demanded an end to US aerial bombardments and to night raids by US Special Forces, which have claimed civilian lives and increased hatred for both the foreign occupation and Karzai’s corrupt puppet government in Kabul.

In February, Karzai barred US special operations troops from operating in the entire province of Maidan Wardak, southwest of Kabul. These and other statements and gestures have been aimed at deflecting popular hostility and posturing as a nationalist leader, rather than Washington’s stooge.

Karzai’s casting himself now as a pragmatic deal maker, however, was by no means welcomed by the Obama administration, which appeared blindsided by the Afghan president’s remarks.

US officials refused to confirm the request for nine bases, which Afghan aides to Karzai said was contained in the latest American draft proposal submitted last month.

White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters in Washington, “The United States does not seek permanent military bases in Afghanistan, and any US presence after 2014 would only be at the invitation of the Afghanistan government and aimed at training the country’s forces and targeting the remnants of Al Qaeda.”
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