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My Favorite Year (Without Glue)
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Rumpl4skn



Joined: 11 Feb 2006
Posts: 2950
Location: 36� 3'N x 86�40'W

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 1:33 pm    Post subject: My Favorite Year (Without Glue) Reply with quote

I know I'd promised a long, detailed report on the 1 year anniversary of the CFGFCFSF Diet (cripes, we need an acronym for that acronym), but around March 3rd, I was slammed with work.

So here is a somewhat abbreviated version, that I hope to add to later. Let me start with what I did 2 weeks ago - I went off the diet. (gasp) Just my natural scientist kicking in, I guess. But I wanted to see if there would be as dramatic a change going off as there was going on. I laid on the dairy pretty heavily - even ate an entire half-gallon of vanilla ice cream across 3 days (was fun, I assure you), and had buttered bread as often as I could, pasta, corn, slices of pizza, etc. (one problem was finding these foods - I'd sanitized the house from all of it for a year). But I work on the road with a recording artist, and it was easy to stray off the hard line at the catering tent.

I have to admit, the first 3 days off the diet, I was beginning to suspect I had imagined the whole well-being thing. I felt no different eating gobs of dairy and wheat and corn. I started to wonder if it wasn't the diet at all, but just another phase of physiology I was passing into - you know, the "every 7 years" chemical/bio change we supposedly go through. But by day 5, without looking for it, I began to feel the general malaise I had lived in for many years. Overly tired mornings, achy joints were just the beginning. The first real clue I had was this - before the diet I had noticed that, for the past 10 years or so, I had been having slight trouble urinating when I first got up, most likely due to a gradually enlarging prostate, that is common in men. Up and about for a while, no problem - just when I urinated right after arising. About 2 weeks into the diet, I had suddenly realized that it wasn't happening anymore. I was pretty sure it hadn't shrunk my prostate, but something had happened, that was for sure. I could urinate like a firehose when I first got out of bed, and hadn't experienced that since my early 30's, as best I could remember.

Well, that was also the first thing I noticed 2 weeks ago when I jumped off the wagon. Slow pee in the morning was back, and it was followed by just a general feeling of "aging", across the board. I just felt crappier, in general. My bowel movements also became less regular, and "looser"... and, dare I say..... quite a bit more odoriferous. (Sorry, but there's no way to convey this without a bit of graphic prose.) I'd also apparently stopped regular exercise, basically because I just didn't feel like it anymore. (And here I thought that was the weed....) Laughing

A few days ago, I'd decided I'd seen, heard, felt and smelled quite enough, and I didn't care to continue the cold-turkey experiment, and I got right back to eating right. That was about 5 days ago, and I can honestly say, last night was the best I've felt since the wagon-jumping, and this morning I feel like my old self of the past glue-free year.

I have some more to add to this, so I will post addendums as memory and time allow. Wink if anyone has any questions, fire away, maybe it'll remind me of some lesser points I had mentally chronicled over the past year.

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"No matter what happens, ever... there's ALWAYS at least one reason. And the top reason is ALWAYS money."
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bri



Joined: 16 Jun 2006
Posts: 3174
Location: Capacious Creek

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So now with over a year of experience in GFCF, what are the ideal foods for you? What do you eat?

I always like to get more input, even if the diet can vary from person to person, which it very well should.

Also, do you worry much about "excitotoxins" like MSG and Aspartame or is GFCF plus Soy and Corn the main effort at the moment?
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Rumpl4skn



Joined: 11 Feb 2006
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Location: 36� 3'N x 86�40'W

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bri wrote:
So now with over a year of experience in GFCF, what are the ideal foods for you? What do you eat?

I think the best way would be to give you a typical day for me.

Breakfast: omelette - egg beaters, pico de gallo (pre-chopped hard veggies), slice of lean ham if I'm in the meat mood and a smidge of goat cheese if I'm feeling naughty. If I'm particularly hungry, I'll add a slice of millet bread with clarified butter.
Lunch: today I had some leftover Chinese, chicken with broccoli over brown rice, and a smidge of soy sauce. Soy is definitely not 100% excluded, due to my love of sushi, but I keep it to a minimum.
Dinner: salmon pan fried in clarified butter and cajun seasoning, steamed veggies with optional clarified butter.

But those are days where I eat 3 full meals, which does not often happen. Often, I'll skip breakfast, have small snacks and only 1 real "meal". A handful of unflavored, potato chips cooked in canola oil (Cape Cod 40% Reduced Fat do nicely), rice cakes with a small amount of goat butter, dark chocolate bits. I do eat a very dark piece of chocolate (pure, non-milkfat or butterfat, high cacao % - 70 and up) almost every day, for the anti-oxidants, since I've cut back on soy.

Quote:
I always like to get more input, even if the diet can vary from person to person, which it very well should.

Also, do you worry much about "excitotoxins" like MSG and Aspartame or is GFCF plus Soy and Corn the main effort at the moment?

Agreed about personal variations. This is what works for me, but I'm also aware that I might manage my own biology better with experimentation. Perhaps totally cutting out all soy would be a good move for me, and I'll have to try it some day. But I won't know til then.

I cut out Aspartame years ago, and have watched MSG closely. But without reading ingredients, you usually have no idea what the hell you're ingesting. And there are some food items that do not clearly represent what is inside, particularly when they introduce a "new thingie" with hidden makeup.

Case in point - just got a dark chocolate, sugar free candy bar that contains "no milkfats" but a new ingredient, Maltitol. No explanation whatsoever for what that is comprised of, other than, and I quote, "An ingredient not found in regular chocolate." Confused Perhaps eye of newt? Spleen of gingrich?

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"No matter what happens, ever... there's ALWAYS at least one reason. And the top reason is ALWAYS money."


Last edited by Rumpl4skn on Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:50 pm; edited 1 time in total
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bri



Joined: 16 Jun 2006
Posts: 3174
Location: Capacious Creek

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Malitol is a sugar alcohol that make some candy bars "sugar free".

Quote:
What is Maltitol?
Maltitol is a sugar alcohol, an ingredient commonly used in low-carb or sugar-free products such as candy and nutrition bars. It is used so much because of its similarity to sugar in terms of taste, mouth feel, and interaction with other ingredients. Products which use maltitol and other sugar alcohols as sweeteners can be called sugar free. Although claims are often made that maltitol has little impact on blood sugar, this turns out not to be the case.
Maltitol Has Carbs
Maltitol is a carbohydrate. Although our bodies do not absorb all the calories in maltitol, this substance does provide us with 2 to 3 calories per gram, compared to the 4 calories per gram of sugar. (For what its worth, I have noticed that the claim of 2 calories per gram usually comes from literature provided by the manufacturer or the low calorie food industry whereas other analyses tend to be closer to 3 calories.) Since maltitol is a carbohydrate, and since it provides calories, you would expect it to impact blood glucose. You would be correct.
Maltitol Has a Relatively High Glycemic Index
In particular, maltitol syrup has a glycemic index of 52, which approaches that of table sugar at 60. The powdered form has a glycemic index of 36, which is still higher than most other sugar alcohols and all artificial sweeteners.


http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/nutrition/a/maltitol.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltitol
Quote:
Commercially, maltitol is a disaccharide produced by Corn Products Specialty Ingredients (formerly SPI Polyols), Cargill, Roquette, and Towa, among other companies. Maltitol is made by hydrogenation of maltose obtained from starch. Its high sweetness allows it to be used without being mixed with other sweeteners, and exhibits negligible cooling effect (positive heat of solution) in comparison with other sugar alcohols, and is very similar to the subtle cooling effect of sucrose.[1] It is used especially in production of sweets: sugarless hard candies, chewing gum, chocolates, baked goods, and ice cream. The pharmaceutical industry uses maltitol as an excipient where it utilised as a low-calorie sweetening agent. Its similarity to sucrose allows it to be used in syrups with the advantage that crystallization (which may cause bottle caps to stick) is less likely. Maltitol may also be used as a plasticiser in gelatine capsules, as an emollient, and as a humectant.[2]


I wouldn't worry about it though if I were you, cutting out the serious culprits as you are. A person will get cravings over a difficult but beneficiary diet change, a little Matirol in a tasty candy bar won't hurt. Beats pigging out on pizza. One every day though...


Last edited by bri on Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:04 pm; edited 1 time in total
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bri



Joined: 16 Jun 2006
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Location: Capacious Creek

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for answering those questions by the way.

Rumpl4skn wrote:


I cut out Aspartame years ago, and have watched MSG closely. But without reading ingredients, you usually have no idea what the hell you're ingesting....


Sometimes MSG can even be secretly listed as...you guessed it..."natural ingredients"

http://www.organicconsumers.org/foodsafety/bewarenatural32905.cfm

Quote:
Claiming MSG is natural because free glutamic acid appears in tomatoes is sort of like saying cocaine is natural because it's derived from ingredients found in the coca leaf.


This analogy may apply to Maritol as well, so tread carefully Rump. But you are way ahead of me, good to know your guinea pig experiment on yourself was so successful. I need to pick up the pace a bit.
I haven't had dairy in pure milk or cheese form in weeks but have been having a couple of cookies every now and again, and a couple of pieces of toast per day. Otherwise veggies but light on beans , a few nuts, some fruits, meats, fish. I get creative when I can or pick up health food store "snacks" when they don't look too deceptive. It's certainly an epic battle, especially with three pizza places within 2 square miles. Beer and other forms of alcohol often serve as a main culprit in the Gluten missteps.

Though it probably varies from person to person but I find my self far more "addicted" to alcohol in the form of Beer or Liquor. I have never binged on Wine or GF Beer, even those with high alcohol content.

Right now I'm enjoying a coffee with blended goats milk. So far it's been a wonderful substitute for cream of cow.


Last edited by bri on Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:18 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Rumpl4skn



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wasn't going to have any more of those bars anyway, since it's described as "dark chocolate", and it's the most milk chocolate-tasting dark I've ever had. Must be 50% cacoa or less. And either way, I certainly didn't mean to imply I eat "a candy bar a day". I meant I have a segment of one most days. Wink

Thanks for the info, I think I'll stick to the Green and Blacks and other semi-exotic ones I discover from time to time, in my quest for the ultimate dark choco high.


I tend to be a habitual eater - outside of dark chocolates, I don't vary or experiment much. Anything new that would cause a problem, I would most likely notice. I would hope.

I come from genetic stock with little affinity for beer, so I'm lucky there. But in the realm of GF beer, I like Redbridge as opposed to New Gryst (the 2 brands I have readily available locally). I think Redbridge tastes great, but my opinion as a beer taster can be readily discarded. I much more of a wine-o or cosmo freak, on occasions when I get drinking.

Also remember - the goat dairy products are lesser in casein, not devoid of it. I prefer almond milk in my coffee now.

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bri



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rumpl4skn wrote:
And either way, I certainly didn't mean to imply I eat "a candy bar a day". I meant I have a segment of one most days.


Yes I understand.

There is a lot of curiosity at this time about the safety of Wheat-starch-based gluten-free products which do contain small amounts of glucose.....In Finland


The Tampere University Hospital in Finland seems to be doing a lot of studies on it for some reason. They say it's safe for Celiac patients.

Hydrogenated starch hydrolysates (HSH) include the above mentioned maltitol.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18710436?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
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Rumpl4skn



Joined: 11 Feb 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes - if anyone else wants to do this, I recommend a cold turkey approach, cutting out every source of casein, gluten, corn and soy you can. Do that primarily for the first 4 days, when the initial cleansing occurs. That will, as it did for me, display exactly the kind of improvements you can expect.

For me, it was not only specific issues that resolved, but an overall vibe of well-being I hadn't felt in a long, long time.

Plus it's cool to be accused by doubters that you've "been taken in by some charlatan's new diet website or DVD", and you look them in the eye and tell them it costs nothing to do, aside from some initial will-power.

_________________
"No matter what happens, ever... there's ALWAYS at least one reason. And the top reason is ALWAYS money."
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bri



Joined: 16 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rumpl4skn wrote:
I like Redbridge as opposed to New Gryst (the 2 brands I have readily available locally). I think Redbridge tastes great, but my opinion as a beer taster can be readily discarded. I much more of a wine-o or cosmo freak, on occasions when I get drinking.

Also remember - the goat dairy products are lesser in casein, not devoid of it. I prefer almond milk in my coffee now.


Redbridge tastes wonderful, but I have no idea what Sorghum is and which nations slaves are producing it. I've heard it's a very nutritious substitute to wheat however. This may or may not be true. Heard soy was healthy once as well. So far sorghum is on the books as lectin-deficient, that's a good sign.
However, it would be quite sick and deceptive on my part to excuse the consumption of alcohol for the sake of "going GF" or for other health reasons. Just something to remember when I do indulge. Laughing
It's weird how wheat and alcohol compliment each other so well. Pizza and Beer. Says something about wheat...

I haven't tried almond yet, kind of got stuck on goats after a bad experience with coconut. I'll grab some.


Last edited by bri on Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:00 pm; edited 1 time in total
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bri



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rumpl4skn wrote:
Yes - if anyone else wants to do this, I recommend a cold turkey approach, cutting out every source of casein, gluten, corn and soy you can.


For me, that's been tough. Tried it for about three days and "Relapsed" a few months ago. I won't go into details as Rump already described a similar experience in graphic detail.
However, a more gradual approach has made the idea of one final cold turkey session much more approachable.
But like you said Rump, all it takes is a little will power, no change in cash flow. Some of us can only handle a step by step approach however. Laughing
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EddieT



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been off nearly all carbs for about two months now, and I still get cravings, especially in the evening. Sometimes they are pretty bad, the temptation is something like this:



I keep a dark (85%) chocolate bar around for moments like this one, but a lot of times I can make it through knowing that if I do take the (figurative) apple, I'll probably wind up with a similar fate to Adam. I'll eat the occasional red delicious without shame Smile

Its been worth it...sleep vastly improved, energy through the roof, six-pack is back, head is clear, and the most surprising thing really was that the alcohol I used to seem to need to wind down at night is no longer necessary. I haven't had any at home for a while now.

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bri



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EddieT wrote:

the most surprising thing really was that the alcohol I used to seem to need to wind down at night is no longer necessary. I haven't had any at home for a while now.

Isn't that strange? As I've said I find my cravings for alcohol in the evening directly coincide with what I eat from the first meal onwards. Casomorphines and Glutomorphines would be labeled as downers I imagine, maybe that's why the drugs mix so well. Wink
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