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Court-appointed advocate molests up to 20 kids

 
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e-lamb



Joined: 08 Mar 2007
Posts: 155

PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 10:11 am    Post subject: Court-appointed advocate molests up to 20 kids Reply with quote


Billy Dan Carroll - is a Court-Appointed Special Advocates, or CASAs, often work with Child Protective Services, and a youth leader at a local church, and last but not least a Pedophile


WorldNetDaily
Court-appointed advocate molests up to 20 kids
Texas entrepreneur filmed having sex with children as young as 3 years old


Police have seized video tapes of court-appointed advocate molesting as many as 20 children. He is being charged with aggravated sexual assault of an 8-year-old girl under his care earlier this month.

Billy Dan Carroll, a 53-year-old entrepreneur and founder of a court-reporting firm, filmed himself having sex with several kids between the ages of 3 and 15, the Austin American Statesman reported.

"We don't know where it is going to end up, how many victims we may end up with," Austin police Sgt. Brian Loyd said. "There could be six. There could be 20. There is no telling."

Carroll told the girl's parents he wanted the 8-year-old and her sisters to spend the night with his family, but he did not reveal that his wife and daughters were away for the weekend. According to the child, he asked if she wanted to play a game. Then he blindfolded her and sexually assaulted her. The little girl immediately told her sisters who were in another room following the incident.

"He was thought of as a family friend," Loyd said.

Police said Carroll also recorded himself having sex with two unconscious adult women. Investigators are attempting to identify the victims, and the Austin authorities are asking anyone with information about the crimes to contact local police.

Court-Appointed Special Advocates, or CASAs, often work with Child Protective Services and assist in mentoring youth. CASA executive director Laura Wolf said Carroll was suspended last week. He passed national and state background checks, an advocate screening process and was cleared with CPS. Carroll had volunteered since 2004, working with young children for four years before his arrest.

"We were completely shocked and really heartbroken about it," Wolf said. "This individual has glowing references from people who had known him for years."

Carroll's company released a statement with the following message:

"It goes without saying that those of us at Fredericks-Carroll are shocked and saddened by this news. Our company was certainly not aware of any of the allegations underlying Mr. Carroll's arrest, and we condemn any criminal behavior that may have occurred."

Police have spent several days sorting through all of the evidence. Authorities seized several incriminating videos, photographs and computers from Carroll's home May 21. His bail is set at $2 million.

Carroll is a youth leader at a local church, and is married with two children.
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Charity: UN peacekeepers, aid workers abusing kids
By EDITH LEDERER 5 hours ago

UNITED NATIONS (AP) U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon expressed "deep concern" Tuesday after a leading children's charity said it uncovered evidence of widespread sexual abuse of children at the hands of U.N. peacekeepers and international aid workers.

The report by Save the Children UK, based on field research in southern Sudan, Ivory Coast and Haiti, describes a litany of sexual crimes against children as young as 6.

It said some children were denied food aid unless they granted sexual favors; others were forced to have sex or to take part in child pornography; many more were subjected to improper touching or kissing.

"The report shows sexual abuse has been widely underreported because children are afraid to come forward," Jasmine Whitbread, chief executive of Save the Children UK, told Associated Press Television News.

"A tiny proportion of peacekeepers and aid workers are abusing the children they were sent to protect. It ranges from sex for food to coerced sex. It's despicable."

At the U.N. headquarters, spokeswoman Michele Montas said Ban "is deeply concerned" by the report.

"We welcome this report. It's fair, and I think it's essentially accurate," Montas said.

She noted the report states the United Nations has already undertaken steps designed to tackle the problem, from establishing conduct and discipline units in all U.N. missions to strengthening training for all categories of U.N. personnel. She said the United Nations also needs to strengthen its investigative capacity.

The study was based on research, confidential interviews and focus groups conducted last year. The charity emphasized it did not produce comprehensive statistics about the scale of abuse but did gather enough information to indicate the problem is severe.

The report said that more than half the children interviewed knew of cases of sexual abuse and that in many instances children knew of 10 or more such incidents carried out by aid workers or peacekeepers.

The Save the Children UK researchers, who met with 129 girls and 121 boys between the ages of 10 and 17, and also with a number of adults, found an "overwhelming" majority of the people interviewed would never report a case of abuse and had never heard of a case being reported.

The threat of retaliation, and the stigma attached to sex abuse, were powerful deterrents to coming forward, the report said.

Ann Buchanan, an Oxford University expert in statistical attempts to quantify rates of child abuse, said the topic is so taboo it is virtually impossible to come up with reliable numbers. But she said the new report provides a useful starting point.

"This will never be a statistical study," she said. "We'd call it a pilot work exploring the start of an issue. All the research shows kids don't make it up."

Buchanan, who directs the Oxford Center for Research into Parenting and Children, said the biggest obstacle to accurate numerical studies of child sexual abuse is the reluctance of children to come forward and tell adults they have been taken advantage of.

"Sexual abuse is a hugely difficult, sensitive area and it's not something that you can usually do surveys about because kids feel terrible shame and are afraid to say what's happened to them," she said. "Given what we know about underreporting of sex abuse, I would say this report is probably true. They've gone about it as sensitively as you can."

Save the Children spokesman Dominic Nutt said U.N. peacekeepers are involved in many abuse cases because they are present throughout the world in such large numbers. But he praised the United Nations for improving its reporting and investigative procedures regarding sex abuse.

"We're not singling out the U.N. In some ways they do a good job. It's all peacekeepers and all aid workers, including Save the Children," that are involved in sexual abuses, he said.

The report says several Save the Children workers were fired for having sex with 17-year-old girls in violation of agency guidelines.

In its report, Save the Children UK makes three key recommendations: establish a way for people to report abuse locally, create an international watchdog agency this year to deal with the problem, and set up a program to deal with the underlying causes of child abuse.

Tom Cargill, Africa program manager at the London think tank Chatham House, said there is no "magic bullet" that can solve the problem quickly.

"The governance of U.N. missions has always been a problem because soldiers from individual states are only beholden to those states," he said. "So it's difficult for the U.N. to pursue charges and difficult for the U.N. to investigate them."

Associated Press writer Gregory Katz in London contributed to this report.
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