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"David Kelly Did Not Commit Suicide" - The Proof
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Fintan
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2006 12:23 pm    Post subject: "David Kelly Did Not Commit Suicide" - The Proof Reply with quote

This is a singular development in the David Kelly affair. Norman Baker,
a former frontbench spokesperson for the Lib-Dems, has written the best
and most hard-hitting article I have read on the issue.


And I've read a lot. Even written one (see post below).

Baker's restrained article is based on the work of the 'Kelly Investigation
Group', and uses devestating innuendo to fill in the blanks left unsaid in
press coverage to date. He sketches a picture of a gory murder.

So here we have a member of parliament in the UK openly writing in the
Sunday Mail --a mainstream newspaper-- about the ruthless murder of
a man who had become inconvenient to the Government's plans.

Like 7/7, the Kelly Affair is not going away.

It's coming back to haunt.

Quote:


I believe David Kelly did not commit suicide
- and I will prove it


By Norman Baker MP
The Mail on Sunday
23 July 2006

The weapons inspector’s death, three years ago this month, caused a firestorm of controversy. Now this MP – using parliamentary questions, privileged access and forensic analysis – has mounted his own investigation, and it casts a devastating new light on what really happened.

Three years ago, one of those events occurred that suddenly and dramatically change the political landscape. Dr David Kelly, the UK's leading weapons inspector, was found dead under a tree on Harrowdown Hill, Oxfordshire. An inquiry set up under Lord Hutton duly found that Dr Kelly committed suicide.

Today I challenge that conclusion. I do so on the basis that the medical evidence available simply cannot support it, that Dr Kelly's own behaviour and character argues strongly against it, and that there were serious shortcomings in the way the legal and investigative processes set up to consider his death were followed.

After months of intensive enquiry, I reveal new evidence which:

    Shows that the alleged method of suicide chosen, far from being common, was in fact unique. Dr Kelly was the only person in the whole of the UK in 2003 deemed to have died in this way

    Reveals irregularities in the actions of the coroner, relating to the issuing death certificate.

    Proves that the pathologist chosen by the coroner to investigate the death had been on the Home Office approved list for just two years, less than almost all the other 43 approved pathologists.

    Raises questions about the actions taken by the police who attended Dr Kelly's house when he was reported missing, actions which a very senior police officer told me were bizarre.

    Uncovers the cosy cabal of friends of Tony Blair who hand-picked Lord Hutton, and why, and who fixed the rules for his inquiry


The weeks leading up to Dr Kelly's death in 2003 had been charged and eventful. In mid-March, British and American forces had invaded Iraq. Saddam Hussein was deposed and on May 1, US President George Bush declared 'mission accomplished', a claim that rings rather hollow now. Then, on May29, came the allegations, broadcast by the BBC, that the intelligence information about Iraq, which in an unprecedented move the Government had decided to release, had been 'sexed up' to make the case for war stronger, particularly with the assertion that Saddam could have chemical or biological ready to fire within 45 minutes.

No 10's director of communications, Alastair Campbell, went ballistic and launched a blistering attack on the BBC, determined in particular to wreck the career of Today programme reporter Andrew Gilligan. David Kelly had provided Mr Gilligan and others in the BBC with much of the ammunition for the claim that the dossier released by the Government to justify war had been presented in a way that stretched the available intelligence to breaking point. He, along with others in the know, was deeply unhappy about the added spin.

In the end, to further the Government's vendetta with the BBC, the Ministry of Defence and No 10 acted to ensure Dr Kelly's name became public. He was thrust into the unwelcome glare of publicity and made to appear in a Soviet-style televised appearance before the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee.

The standard explanation then was that Dr Kelly, a very private man, felt humiliated by this process and let down by the MoD, and he recognised that his actions in speaking to journalists would bring his career to an effective end. They would certainly prevent him from returning to Iraq to do what he did best and enjoyed most uncovering hidden weapons and weapons programmes, so making the world a safer place. And so, according to this view, he left his cottage in Southmoor, walked into the woods and took his own life through a combination of wrist injuries and an overdose of the painkiller co-proxamol. A personal tragedy but nothing more. Case closed.

Except I never subscribed to this conclusion. There were too many unanswered questions, none of which was resolved by the Hutton Inquiry As time has gone by, those questions have gnawed away at me. And I am not alone. In January 2004, three doctors - David Halpin, a specialist in trauma and orthopaedic surgery, Stephen Frost, a specialist in diagnostic radiology, and Searle Sennett, a specialist in anaesthesiology - voiced their doubts about the suicide verdict in a letter to The Guardian. They said Dr Kelly could not have killed himself in the way described to the Hutton Inquiry. Now, having resigned my frontbench role for the Lib Dems earlier this year, I have found the time to conduct my own investigation.

The first problematic area concerns the severed artery in Dr Kelly's wrist. Those who are familiar with the human body will, if they choose to die this way, make an incision the length of the inside forearm because this leads to a very large loss of blood. Those unfamiliar with the body may cut across the wrist, thereby severing the radial artery. Instead, we are asked to believe that Dr Kelly managed to completely sever the ulnar artery, a minor artery of matchstick thickness to be found deep in the wrist on the little finger side of the hand, and protected by nerves and tendons.

It is difficult to believe Dr Kelly would have made this cut. It would have required unusual force to cut through the nerves and tendons, particularly with the gardening knife he had, and the process would have been painful. Even if he did somehow cut this artery himself; it is quite clear that this would not have killed him. I spoke to David Halpin, the former senior orthopaedic and trauma surgeon at Torbay Hospital and The Princess Elizabeth, Exeter. He told me that even the deepest cut here would not have caused death. He also told me that 'a completely transected [severed] artery retracts immediately I and thus stops bleeding, even at a relatively high blood pressure'.

Then there is the evidence of the ambulance team who attended the scene where Dr Kelly was found. They told the Hutton Inquiry that the amount of blood found at the site and on Dr Kelly's clothing was minimal and surprisingly small.

I contacted Dave Bartlett, the ambulance technician who, with paramedic Vanessa Hunt, formed the team that attended the scene. He told me last month that the two of them 'stand by what we have already said 100 per cent'. Vanessa Hunt has said that, in her view 'it is incredibly unlikely that he died from the wrist wound we saw'.

Could Dr Kelly nevertheless have died from the blood he lost? I tracked down Dr Sennett and his response was clear:

'For a man the size of Dr Keily to die from haemorrhage, he would have to lose at least three litres of blood. I suggest that it would be impossible to lose a lethal amount of blood from an ulnar artery which had been cut in the manner described for Dr Kelly.'

Were these doctors right? I wanted to know how many people in the UK died in 2003 from injury to the ulnar artery. I eventually received a forrmal reply from the National Statistician, Karen Dunnell. The answer? One. Presumably Dr Kelly.

There is also the knife allegedly used for the purpose. This was a blunt gardening knife with a concave blade, a singularly inappropriate weapon to use. To cut through nerves and tendons with such a knife must have been difficult. Dr Kelly, with his scientific background and knowledge of the human body, could without doubt have found an easier way to commit suicide had he wished to do so.

It might be argued that this was a spontaneous suicide and that all he had with him was this particular knife, which he often carried. But that is contradicted by the presence of the coproxamol tablets, which, according to the official explanation, demonstrate premeditation. This circle simply cannot be squared.

Evidence presented at the Hutton Inquiry invites us to conclude that Dr Kelly removed three blister packs of these tablets, each containing ten tablets, from his house. The police say that they found 29 out of 30 tablets gone, implying therefore that Dr Kelly had consumed these. It strikes me as odd that Dr Kelly should apparently leave one of the 30 tablets in its place. Surely someone set on suicide will take the maximum dose available, not leave one? Of course this remaining tablet did present the police with a rather obvious clue.

Furthermore, Alexander Allan, the forensic toxicologist at the inquiry, considered that the amount of each drug component found in the blood was only a third of that which would normally be considered fatal. All that was found in Dr Kelly's stomach was the equivalent of the fifth of one tablet. His stomach was virtually empty, which suggests that even if he did swallow 29 tablets, much would have been regurgitated, making it even less likely that these contributed in any significant way to his death.

Interestingly, those who knew Dr Kelly well maintain that he had an aversion to swallowing tablets.

What about the motive? Wasn't Dr Kelly terribly depressed, potentially even suicidal? Those who knew him find that very difficult to accept.

Sarah Pape, his sister, is a consultant plastic surgeon. Referring to conversations with her brother before his death, she told the Hutton Inquiry:

'In my line of work I deal with people who may have suicidal thoughts, and ought to be able to spot those, even in a telephone conversation. But I have gone over and over in my mind the two conversations we had and he certainly did not betray to me any impression that he was anything other than tired. He certainly did not convey to me that he was feeling depressed, and absolutely nothing that would have alerted me to the fact he might have been considering suicide.'

Of course, these were difficult times for Dr Kelly. He was under enormous pressure, had been thrust into the glare of the public spotlight, and had had a torrid time in front of the Foreign Affairs Committee on July 15, just two days before he went for his last walk. That much is known. Less well known is that his good humour and confidence had at least partly returned on July 16, when he gave evidence in private to the Intelligence and Security Committee. I have read the transcript of that meeting and it shows Dr Kelly laughing and even making jokes.

Then there are the e-malls he sent on the morning of July 17, the day' of his disappearance. These were generally upbeat and talked enthusiastically about returning to Iraq.

So apparently were his phone calls, for after one to the Ministry of Defence, a flight to lraq was booked for him for the following week. One e-mail, however, did refer to 'dark actors playing games'. Who they were, and what games they were playing, has yet to be established. Another factor that mitigates against the suicide theory is that one of Dr Kelly's daughters was due to be married shortly and he was obviously looking forward to that.

Lastly, it should not be forgotten that Dr Kelly was a practicing member of the Baha'i faith, which strongly condemns the act of suicide.

Yet within 24 hours of the e-mails being sent, David Kelly was dead. We had lost the man who had probably done more than anyone else to reduce the threat to the world from biological and chemical weapons.

But with a cruel asymmetry; while Dr Kelly lay dead under a tree, Tony Blair, the mouthpiece of the now discredited 45-minute claim, was being feted by President Bush and being offered the rare honour of a Congressional Medal. The Prime Minister was on a plane from Washington to Tokyo when he was told of Dr Kelly's death. His response was immediate. Before the journey was over, Lord Brian Hutton had been appointed to head an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of Dr David Kelly'.

How was this breakneck-speed appointment made? Parliament had no say in this. With perfect political timing for the Prime Minister, the Commons had adjourned for its long summer recess at 4.55pm on July 17, just hours before Dr Kelly's body was found. The decision to hold an inquiry; the remit given to it and the choice of the judge to chair it were all decisions for the Government. I have now had it officially confirmed that it was Blair's old friend Charlie Falconer, the Lord Chancellor, who handpicked Lord Hutton, having discussed the matter first with the Prime Minister and formally consulted the Senior Law Lord.

Why choose Lord Hutton? In a parliamentary answer to me, Harriet Harman, the Minister at the Department for Constitutional Affairs, confirmed that he had not chaired any public inquiry before he was asked to undertake this most sensitive of tasks.

There is no suggestion that Lord Hutton is anything other than an independent person of integrity; but his record may have suggested to those choosing him that he would be likely to produce the right result.

In Northern Ireland, where he sat as a judge, he sentenced ten men to a total of 1,001 years' imprisonment in 1984 on the word of a paid informer who was granted immunity from prosecution. As a senior barrister, he had also defended the Government of the day against allegations that internees in Northern Ireland had been tortured. More recently, he led the campaign against the extradition of General Pinochet back to Chile on the grounds that one of the five Law Lords involved in the case had links with the human-rights group Amnesty International.

As Sir Humphrey observed in an episode of [the BBC's] 'Yes, Minister', you don't choose a judge who can be leaned on. You choose one who doesn't have to be.

Whatever the reason, it is clear that what should have been a rigorous investigation into the death of Dr Kelly turned out to be nothing of the sort.

First, the Lord Chancellor decided the inquiry should not, as expected, be held under the rules established by the Tribunals of Inquiry (Evidence) Act 1921. The significance of this is that witnesses could not be subpoenaed. Nor did they have to give evidence under oath. The inquiry was therefore less rigorous and formal than a standard coroner's inquest.

Then there are the actions of the Oxfordshire coroner himself, Nicholas Gardiner. His inquest was adjourned on the instruction of Lord Falconer. But I have unearthed the fact that a full death certificate was issued by the local registrar (following the instructions of the coroner) on August 18 - a week after the Hutton Inquiry started hearing evidence - giving explicit reasons for death.

I have a copy of that certificate. It cites haemorrhage and incised wounds to the left wrist, conclusions that are far from certain for the reasons given above.

When I asked Harriet Harman how it was that the coroner was able to establish cause of death when the Hutton Inquiry had barely started, she replied that he 'was able to ascertain reasons for ... death from the post-mortem report from the Home Office pathologist, Dr Hunt, and the toxicology report from Dr Allen [sic]. The death certificate, we now learn, was issued as a result of a meeting on August 14 between Dr Hunt, Dr Allan (or their representatives) and the coroner. A parliamentary question I asked has now revealed that this meeting followed an unusual, even irregular, meeting between Home Office officials and the coroner on August 11. Doubtless the officials were able to help guide the coroner on the way forward.

So what was the point of setting up an inquiry to look into the circumstances of Dr Kelly's death when the facts had, it appears, already been decided? And where did that leave the normal inquest procedure, as even that wasn't followed?

More pertinently still, the Coroners Rules required that 'where an inquest has been adjourned for any reason', an interim certificate of death shall be issued if needed. In effect, this is a certificate only to confirm death and allow the body to be buried. Clearly, the rule was not followed in this case.

I discussed the matter with Michael Powers QC, a leading expert on coroners' law, who professed himself astonished that a full death certificate could have been issued in this way. So with the Hutton Inquiry barely started, the Oxfordshire coroner determines the cause of death without the normal inquest procedure, bases this on the severing of the ulnar artery, the only such cause of death in the whole of2003, and relies exclusively, it seems, on Dr Allan, who later would tell the inquiry that the level of coproxamol present was insufficient to cause death, and on the findings of pathologist Nicholas Hunt.

What of Dr Hunt? Who selected him for this task? The Oxfordshire coroner, it turns out. He chose him from a list of pathologists approved from the Home Office as being suitably qualified to be competent to investigate suspicious or violent deaths. I have secured a list of those so approved in 2003. It contains the names of 43 such pathologists, many with great experience, having been added to the list as far back as 1978. Dr Hunt was added to the list only in 2001. Just seven ofthe43 pathologists were added after him.

Now it may be that Dr Hunt has much to recommend him, but in a case as sensitive as this, wouldn't it have been more normal to have selected someone with more experience, or indeed, as Michael Powers suggested to me, to have chosen two pathologists to work together?

The police operation was also a rather curious one. The files are all off-limits, locked up at Thames Valley Police headquarters, but an interesting nugget is to be found deep in the inquiry website. 'Operation Mason', as it was termed, was begun at 2.30pm on July 17, around nine hours before David Kelly was reported missing, and at least half an hour before he left his home to go on that last walk. No satisfactory explanation has ever been given for this astonishing foresight on the part of police.

Then there is the response after the call to the police was made. First there was the erection of a 45ft antenna in Dr Kelly's garden. I have spoken to one of the most senior police officers in the UK who could offer no possible explanation for a structure this size and doubted if many police forces actually had such a piece of equipment.

He was also at a loss to explain why Dr Kelly's wife Janice was turfed out of her house in the middle of the night to stand on the lawn for an extended period while a dog was put through the house. He called it 'bizarre'.

At the Hutton Inquiry itself, conflicting evidence was piled on top of conflicting evidence with seemingly no attempt to get to the truth.

Crucially, the position of the body seems in doubt, with those who found it - search-party volunteers Louise Holmes and Paul Chapman - insisting the body was sitting up or slumped against a tree, while DC Graham Coe later states it was flat on its back away from the tree.

Moreover, three items the volunteers swear were not present - the blunt knife, a watch and an opened bottle of Evian water - had mysteriously appeared by the body by the time DC Coe left the scene.

Then there are the basic questions that would occur to even a rookie police officer but which here went unasked, or at least unanswered.

Whose fingerprints were on the knife? Was there any DNA other than Dr Kelly's to be found in the blood samples taken? Was Dr Kelly's watch, which lay beside him, broken or intact? What time did it show? What were the last calls made to the mobile phone he had on him? We do not know and Lord Hutton does not ask.

But then Lord Hutton, tasked to examine the circumstances surrounding Dr Kelly's death, seemed peculiarly uninterested in these, giving every appearance of simply going through the motions. In this he was not alone. For the media too, the focus was firmly on the battle between the BBC and the Government. That focus may have taken the light off a much more important story.

After Hutton formally reported, the coroner would have been within his rights to reopen the inquest, but he chose not to do so, despite being made aware of the considerable doubts about the medical evidence. Many people find it hard to accept that Dr Kelly's death was suicide, and the passage of time has only firmed up that doubt. lam conscious that some, particularly those who were close to him, will want to put all this behind them, to move on.

The reality, however, is that this episode is not going to go away. Perhaps Dr Kelly, renowned for his persistence, dedication and aptitude for systematic and logical questioning, would have understood that some of us cannot rest until the many important unanswered questions have finally been resolved.

http://dr-david-kelly.blogspot.com/

Please leave your comments.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


The Kelly Investigation Group is working in parallel with Norman Baker. Visit KIG websites here

http://dr-david-kelly.blogspot.com/

and here

http://www.deadscientists.blogspot.com/

If you have important information please contact:
Rowena Thursby
RowenaThursby@onetel.com


Last edited by Fintan on Mon Jul 24, 2006 10:13 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2006 12:37 pm    Post subject: The timing of this... Reply with quote

Quote:
The Times January 31, 2005

Suicide painkiller withdrawn
By Sam Lister
Popular drug taken off shelves after overdoses and accidents
ONE of Britains most commonly used drugs is to be withdrawn over concerns about the high risk of accidental death from slight overdose and its frequent use in suicides, The Times has learnt.

Co-proxamol, prescribed to hundreds of thousands of Britons every year, is to be the subject of a staggered withdrawal because of evidence that it can cause death if patients exceed the maximum recommended dosage by as little as two tablets.



It even goes on to mention the "suicide" of David Kelly further on in the article. Do you think that this move, co-incidental in timing it may be, will act as a potent re-inforcer of the official story of DK's death?

Personally, I find it hard to accept that a guy who is an expert on chemical and biological ways and means to Megadeath would choose *Co-Proxamol* (For our US friends - Acetaminophen with dextropropoxyphene, used in cough medicines) to kill himself with, for a start. 'Iffy' just doesn't begin to cover this 'orgy of evidence'.

Quote:

He proceeded to one of his favorite haunts, a peaceful and secluded spot, where sometime between 4.15 pm and 1.15 am he removed his watch and glasses, swallowed over 20 pills, and repeatedly slashed at his left wrist, leaving the radial artery intact but completely severing the ulnar artery which caused him to bleed to death, most of the blood soaking into the detritus of the woodland floor.

In the process of stumbling or thrashing about in the undergrowth he possibly sustained minor abrasions to the scalp and lower lip, along with bruising to the lower legs and left side of chest. His demise was further hastened by a less than fatal but more than therapeutic blood level of dextropropoxyphene and paracetamol, and by clinically silent coronary artery disease.


I mean, whaaaa? :roll:

Just a thought,
C.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2006 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

so how was he really 'offed'?
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 12:46 am    Post subject: Not like that. Reply with quote

Quote:
so how was he really 'offed'?


Not like that.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The MSM has the story now, so.... I'm not sure what to think:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060723/wl_afp/iraqweaponsbritain;_ylt=Ajvl8Ie7KVbNNpjVLEMbiHRvaA8F;_ylu=X3oDMTA0cDJlYmhvBHNlYwM-

If this hits big in the mainstream, what underlying purpose will it accomplish?

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 10:44 am    Post subject: Naming the Elephant Reply with quote

Well, that Yahoo picked it up will get it international attention, but it was
already in the UK mainstream.

Yesterday, in the UK, Mr. and Mrs. Middle Class, settling down after a
leisurely Sunday lunch, opened their Mail on Sunday, to find a member
of parliament making a strong case which implies that their Government
murdered Dr. David Kelly.

The media will pass on. As usual. But the stench will only grow.

Here's the article I wrote back at the time. I'm reprinting it here, because
it was written on our GuluFuture website --before BreakForNews.
So, by publishing here it will now google under BreakForNews.

Quote:
How was he really offed?

Damm good question. If only a fraction of one tablet was found in his
stomach, it wasn't because of an overdose. And if he lost little blood, then
heart failure due to hemorrhage is impossible. So the official story
has got a major problem.

So how did he really die?
The 'boys' have lots of undetectable means at their disposal.
You know what I mean.

Pay close attention to the role of Tom Mangold in my July, 2003 article:

Quote:
THE KELLY SUICIDE?
NAMING THE ELEPHANT




21st July, 2003 by Fintan Dunne,
Editor http://www.GuluFuture.com
Full Hyperlinked Original:
http://www.gulufuture.com/david_kelly.htm

It was absurdly easy to murder Dr. David Kelly.
His regular habit of walking through the quiet fields
to nearby Longworth Hill saw to that.


The killer was waiting there, amid the trees near the hilltop. As Kelly arrived he moved into plain sight, pretending to admire the view while reading a map.

He casually asked Dr. Kelly for directions. But once he got close, he sprayed a mist in the scientist's face. Kelly collapsed and was instantly unconscious.

With a fast deft movement, he slit Kelly's left wrist, standing well clear to avoid bloodstains on his own clothing. While the still unconscious Dr. Kelly bled to death, he pressed a packet of Co-proxamol, a prescription painkiller, into Kelly's right hand, then shook it onto the grass nearby.

The tablets were mere window dressing designed to enhance the suicide scenario. As the post mortem would later confirm, Kelly died as a result of the massive hemorrhage.

It had taken only minutes to create a sacrificial lamb who could be the spur for overthrowing Blair's leadership of the British Labour Party. An outcome which could eventually have explosive effects on the US political system too.

There was no other choice.

In Washington, Blair had just made a tactical appeal to the judgment of history for his action in invading Iraq, as US politicians cheered him on.

Meanwhile, the BBC Board was living on borrowed time:

Quote:
"Dr Kelly was supposed to have been the joker in the pack that would end the long-running battle with the BBC. He was supposed to have knocked down Andrew Gilligan’s claims once and for all, allowing Mr Blair to head off to Washington with the affair all but finished."
The Scotsman, 19 July, 2003,
Prime Minister faces his biggest challenge


Kelly was clearly the BBC source for Gilligan's story on the "sexing-up" of evidence of Iraqi WMD. Soon Alistair Campbell would no doubt claim Gilligan exaggerated Kelly's comments and the BBC had backed him in a lie by claiming their source was in the intelligence services.

Tony Blair would then piously condemn sloppy journalism and insist his Iraq dossier was soundly based overall. As he had done in Washington, he would appeal again to the court of history as his judge. The campaign to oust Blair would be over.

That outcome was preventable. By murdering Dr. Kelly.

SUICIDE OR MURDER?

What you have just read above is a scenario. It's the kind of plausible scenario which might well occur to a senior police officer investigating the murder of Dr. Kelly. But there is no such officer investigating murder. The police have said there is no indication of any other party being involved. That means it's a suicide --in all but name.

The suicide theme was also the thrust of widely reported comments by Tom Mangold, a journalist friend of Dr. Kelly. (According to the CIA, Mangold's biography of James Angleton, the CIA's famous head of counterintelligence
will probably hold the field until the Agency releases its files.) Mangold is today leading the charge against the BBC.

Here's Mangold's account of his conversation with Dr. Kelly's wife Janice:

Quote:
"She didn’t use the word ‘depressed’, but she said he was very stressed and unhappy about what had happened, and this was really not the kind of world he wanted to live in."
The Scotsman, 19th July
'Kelly told wife this wasn't world he wanted'


The headline on the above article is wrong. Did Kelly reallly tell his wife "this was not the kind of world he wanted to live in"? It seems it was her conclusion which Mangold was reporting --not Dr. Kelly's own words. As her later interview with the New York Times indicated.

And she didn't use the word "depressed," says Mangold. Undoubtedly there were many words she didn't use. Rather than simply quote her, Mangold redundantly tells us what words she didn't use. The headline jumps to an incorrect conclusion from Mangold's embelishments.

All of which is strange really, because a more unlikely candidate for suicide would be harder to find than Dr. Kelly. Forget that guff about Kelly being a shy, retiring scientist unnerved by the cut and thrust of public questioning by the parliamentary committee which demanded his presence.

True, Dr. Kelly was soft spoken, but this was merely a pleasant lightness of tone. He was hard as nails, with an intellect as sharp as the knife which took his life.

Kelly's determination is clear from this account of how he dealt as an arms inspector with Iraqi attempts at concealment of weapons programs:

Quote:
"His favourite foe was Dr. Rihab Taha, the head of Saddam’s bio-weapons programme. It was Kelly who dubbed her “Dr Germ”. Her response to Kelly’s questions was to launch into an angry shouting match or to burst into tears. Other UN inspectors were disarmed by this reaction and found her impossible to deal with. Kelly, with the patience of a research scientist involved in a long experiment, would wait for the tantrum to subside then resume questioning."
Sunday Times, 20 July 2003, by Nicholas Rufford
'Scientist whose first loyalty was to seeking truth'


Not only could Kelly stand the heat, he was used to working in a the hot kitchen which is the weapons inspector's arduous role:

Quote:
"The inspectors were serially lied to, deceived, spied on, harassed, bullied and obstructed....[ ] Unscom was disbanded and from the ashes arose Unmovic, the UN Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission. Gone were the hard-eyed experts such as David Kelly."
TimesOnline, September 13th, 2002 by Tom Mangold
'How Saddam hid his deadly bio arsenal


Harassment, bullying and obstruction are regular landscape of weapons inspectors. This is a kick-ass, hard-nosed weapons inspector. Does he sound like the kind of man who would be intimidated by appearing before a parliamentary committee to answer questions? Hardly.

Quote:
“I sometimes feel locked in a battle of minds,” he once said. “They are clever and I have to be cleverer.”
Sunday Times, 20 July 2003, by Nicholas Rufford
'Betrayed - The torment of a man of morals'


Far from being intimidated, Kelly was angry he had been quizzed by parliamentarians --some of whom obviously knew little about the issues of substance in the Iraq WMD dossier. As his daughter confirmed:

Quote:
"She said her father was not a depressive but had realised he had not controlled his performance in front of the committee. “Being called ‘chaff’ and ‘a fall guy’ didn’t help either,” she told Mangold."
Sunday Times, 20 July, 2003
Daughter says father was badly treated by ministry


The key phrase above is: "controlled his performance."

Dr. Kelly was methodical, meticulous, and very patient. A quintessentially scientific disposition. So patient was he, that on the day he disappeared he was in no hurry to jump to any conclusions about his appearance in front of the committee:

Quote:
"Kelly wrote [in an e-mail, that] he would “wait until the end of the week” before judging reaction to his testimony.”
Sunday Times, 20 July 2003, by Nicholas Rufford
"DR Kelly: I felt betrayed..


In other words, Dr. Kelly was a classic case most unlikely to suddenly take his life on impulse. His was a personality founded on self-control. He was if anything, a candidate for a deadly alternative type of suicide: someone who could plan every detail of his demise in secret and execute it with maximum precision.

Such suicides regularly occur. Sadly, these people often pay off bills, prepare wills, arrange finances and write letters of farewell. Doing so with a controlled veneer which betrays nothing of their plans. Their self control becomes their ally in suicide, and their unwavering approach becomes their undoing.

In Dr. Kelly's case, such a slow, methodical suicide was a possibly. But an intemperate act was never an option.

Yet the suicide hypothesis would have us believe he suffered a huge change of heart just after indicating his state of mind in this e-mail written shortly before he left for his regular walk on Thursday 17th July, 2003:

Quote:
"He also sent an e-mail to his close friend, scientist Alastair Hay, saying: “Many thanks for your support. Hopefully, it will soon pass and I can get back to Baghdad to get on with some real work.” This was a reference to his ambition to return to Iraq and complete his work as a weapons inspector."
Sunday Herald, 20 July 2003, by Neil Mackay
'Blair on brink as Kelly family point finger'


Further indications of his state of mind come from this account of his departure on that last walk:

Quote:
"He said he was going for a walk and that there was no indication of anything untoward. He was seen by farmer Paul Weaver as he walked through farmland north of the A420 near his home. Weaver said Kelly had appeared happy and smiled at him."
Sunday Times, 20 July 2003,
'Special Branch seals off Whitehall office'


And why would he not feel happier? He had spent the previous two days at a Ministry of Defense safe house to avoid reporters. Now, the worst was behind him. He was back with his family in the home he loved. He had caught up with his e-mail correspondence. And he was heading off on one of his habitual relaxing walks. Consider this idyllic account:

Quote:
"I visited him most often in the summer, when his garden was in bloom... [ ] trimming the edge of his lawn, occasionally mopping his forehead and wiping his spectacles. Janice, his wife, would bring tea or lemonade. His daughters... would arrive or leave with boyfriends or girlfriends. It was a happy household; I believe it gave him strong roots to do brave and sometimes dangerous things in Iraq.
Sunday Times, 20 July 2003, by Nicholas Rufford
'Scientist whose first loyalty was to seeking truth


Clearly, this was a time and here was a place where Dr. Kelly could be more at ease. Certainly, three or four days later, when he had time to brood over issues, it might well be that he could deliberately and with due preparation take his own life. But right now, there was little risk of that.

However there was considerable risk of murder. Whether by a foreign power, rogue intelligence agents or geopolitical schemers. Kelly was a lever attached to the underbelly of the Anglo-American power block through Tony Blair. Pressing down on that lever could topple the whole edifice.

Did someone press down the Kelly lever?

NAMING THE ELEPHANT

Even before Dr. Kelly's body was found, halfway around the world on his diplomatic tour, Prime Minister Tony Blair had already been informed of his disappearance. Instantly, Dr. Kelly became the most important man in Britain. But, the search for this vital individual was halted overnight:

Quote:
"Susan Melling, a neighbour, said... "My husband told me they would be searching all the way to the village of Longworth, which was the nearest village to where he was heading." The search went on into the early hours, before it was resumed after daylight yesterday, with a team of 70... organised by Thames Valley Police."
The Scotsman, 19th July
'Kelly told wife this wasn't world he wanted'


Had Dr. Kelly been lying injured somewhere in the area of his home, that overnight pause in the search could have been critical. Why were not police, army, dog units and even search & rescue helicopters deployed in the search immediately? The response seems much too low key.

Low key also is attitude of the police when they stated that there were no indications of any other person being involved in his death. If Dr. Kelly was indeed murdered, it was not because a tramp attacked him in the woods. It was because competent and expert individuals had ruthlessly exterminated him for political or commercial gain. Such persons de facto leave no indications.

Certainly none which would be uncovered by a perfunctory examination. A disabling agent, if used would be designed to be undetectable by routine autopsy. Only a proactive investigation would uncover any evidence.

For example: spectroscopic analysis of nasal tissue to detect unusual chemical compounds; similar tests of skin samples for the presence of latex indicating he had been touched by a person wearing latex gloves; confirmation of whether Kelly was right handed and would be expected to have cut his left wrist (scientists are disproportionately left-handed); examination of phone and e-mail records to see if he left home to meet someone; tracing and accounting for the bona fides of all guests staying in local accommodation; etc..

Perhaps such inquiries are indeed ongoing. If so, we would hardly expect the police to be elaborating such discomforting lines of inquiry before the public gaze. Perhaps the "powers-that-be" are fully cognizant of the murder angle and are already investigating accordingly.

Or perhaps the fix is in. The imminent public inquiry is already steering all concerned into the suicide assumption without due diligence to eliminate the alternative: murder.

Quote:
"A team of Special Branch detectives moved into Kelly’s office in the MoD’s headquarters late on Friday, securing it from any outside interference. Peter Neyroud, chief constable of Thames Valley police, will early this week meet Lord Hutton, the law lord leading the independent judicial inquiry...."
Sunday Times, 20 July 2003,
'Special Branch seals off Whitehall office'


Last year, while sitting as a Law Lord, Lord Hutton ruled that the former MI5 agent and whistle-blower, David Shayler, did not act in the public interest when he disclosed state secrets alleging illegal activities and incompetence in the security services.

Now he is to investigate another whistle-blower in the intelligence arena. But, Lord Hutton says it will be for him alone to decide the scope of the investigation. Who cares about it's scope. It is the direction of the investigation which is the vital issue.

Already, skeptical observers around the world are assuming Kelly was murdered. But in the United Kingdom, this has become a giant elephant in the political living room. Right now, we are steadfastly tiptoeing around that beast --not daring to mention its name.

US and British troops gave their lives to some notion of democracy in Iraq. Now a guerilla war is being waged to drive them out of the most strategic and lucrative oil corner of the globe. That's pressure at the level of the infantryman. Dr. Kelly's death is pressure at the top political level which may lead to US/UK withdrawal from Iraq.

In the Kelly case, the name of the massive elephant is: War Casualty.

Full Hyperlinked Original:
http://www.gulufuture.com/david_kelly.htm
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 11:09 am    Post subject: Y'know... Reply with quote

Y'know this really does stink to high heaven - all of it.

Maybe even a bit too stinky - I mean if I was going to think of a way to 'off' someone like DK, the scenario we've been presented with stinks worse than it could because:

1.) A 59-year old guy, maybe 1 year from retirement, tops himself, presumed to be because of the pressure and the blight on his career
2.) He was a member of the Bah' Faith since '99, they strongly condemn suicide
3.) That an expert on bio/chem weapons would choose Co-Proxamol to use in a suicide attempt
4.) Arsing up the wrist-slash like that. How hard would it have been to inflict a convincing injury, instead?

If you're gonna go to all the trouble of implementing some kind of black-ops 'liquidation' with all the effort and time that suggests, you'd surely take into account the above, at least, no?*

Regards,
C.

* Please note - I'm not trying to suggest that maybe he *did* commit suicide - I'm just pondering the sloppy-seeming details of the alternative scenario.(Which I'm far more inclined towards, myself)

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a feeling as this 'stench' grows the criminals are going to need a disposable patsy very fast. I'll be interested to see who is offered up for sacrifice.

Excuse the negativity concerning public enquiries, but are we ever likely to find out who suicided Dr Kelly? I'm so convinced he was murdered by looking at the evidence that whoever killed him will do anything not to be implicated in this mess.
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A question: from the David Kelly blog, bottom article:

Quote:
Join the Kelly Investigation Group and stay informed. Doctors in the group include David Halpin, Searle Sennett, Stephen Frost, Bill McQuillan, John Scurr, Martin Birnstingl, Chris Burns-Cox and Peter Fletcher. QC Michael Powers acts as consultant. We are now working in parallel with Liberal Democrat MP, Norman Baker -- and an important media event is in the pipeline.


Any relation to Peter Powers?

How about any of the other doctors' names?

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 1:31 pm    Post subject: More Media Reply with quote

And the coverage continues in the Daily Mail today.

This article had comments from the Mail's unwashed masses.

I say it "had" because if you go to the article online now you will
find ZERO comments. That's right. Nobody has yet commented, says the Daily Mail website. Eh?

Quote:
Reader comments (0)
No comments have so far been submitted. Why not be the first to send us your thoughts?

What about the 26 comments you can read below from an earlier saved version of the page?

Gone.
It was a bit too much for the Mail apparently.
Truth is fine ---but only in small doses.

Quote:
Will we ever be told the truth about the death of Dr David Kelly?

by MELANIE PHILLIPS - Daily Mail - 24 July 2006

.....Right from the start, however, there were many who were not convinced Dr Kelly had taken his own life at all. Many aspects of the story just didn't seem to add up....

Despite the expertise of these sceptics, their claims went largely unnoticed. The implications seemed too far-fetched to be taken seriously. After all, if Dr Kelly did not commit suicide, and clearly didn't just drop dead of natural causes, he must have been killed.

Who could have done such a deed? The Iraqi secret service? Our own? Shadowy terrorists lying in wait in the Oxfordshire woods armed with undetectable poisons and an array of evidence to lay a false trail and bamboozle everyone?

No, this kind of thinking properly belonged in the pages of John Le Carre's fiction.

But now, it has not only been taken up within Parliament, but the original charges of inconsistency have been embellished with much more evidence which can no longer be ignored.....


Now, it has taken just one terrier-like MP to unearth all this information.

Why has no official body asked the same questions about all these obvious peculiarities? Why has no one given a straight answer to those who have raised them?.....

In the light of all this, the coroner's decision not to resume the inquest into Dr Kelly's death because there were 'no exceptional circumstances' appears totally unsustainable. A full inquest is now imperative to get to the bottom of this disturbing mystery once and for all.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/newscomment.html?in_article_id=397340&in_page_id=1787&in_a_source

26 people have commented on this story so far.
Tell us what you think below.


Quote:
I tend to agree, I was never happy with the story of suicide, it did not add up.

- John, exeter, England


When Tony Blair meets his maker, he has a lot to as forgiveness for - I hope he is not forgiven.

- Karen, Ex Pat


This whole affair stinks from start to finish. A lot of reasonably intelligent people in the UK probably feel the same way.

- Darren Marsh, Chessington, Surrey


I never believed in the Hutton report. Dr Kelly was viewed as the culprit by the government and yet they are the ones appointing an investigator. Fox guarding the hen house.

- Nathan, Milwaukee,Wisconsin


Norman Baker's points are all very good but one thing has been left out. In a special report published by the Daily Mail on Saturday 6th March 2004 by Sue Reid it stated in the third paragraph: 'Even before Lord Hutton's historic judgment, Mai Pederson, an American army intelligence officer and confidante of Dr. Kelly, said the scientist would never have taken his own life. More intriguingly, she explained that he hated all types of pill. He even had trouble swallowing a headache tablet.'

- Louise Mclean, London


Norman Baker MP gives a series of compelling reasons for doubting that Dr David Kelly committed suicide. But who murdered him? Who stood to profit from his death? The government certainly did not. The immediate result was an acute political crisis for Tony Blair. Even with the appointment of the "safe" Lord Hutton in charge, Blair had no guarantee that the Hutton inquiry would clear him and as it happened the evidence given to the inquiry did lasting damage to his reputation. Moreover, if a professional killer had murdered Dr Kelly would he not have made a more convincing appearance of suicide?

- Richard, London, England


With plausable deniability and spin I wouldn't put anything past this Blair Government.

- Mike, Denia,Spain


The truth will never be known.

- Peter, London


How obvious was it that Dr Kelly's death was not suicide.

- Helen, uk


The whole episode is indeed a bit 'smelly' and should be independently investigated.

- Freddie, Northants


Considering how much blood this government has on its hands through incompetence and design, a lot of people might figure this was murder.

- Ryk, London

One poster asks what would the Government have to gain. Dr Kelly was not a 'middle' ranking civil servant he was depicted as in the 'spin'. He was the worlds expert on WMD, who had sat alongside Tony Blair in briefings. He was privy to vasts amounts of information on The Russians, the Iranians, as well as Iraq. When someone is cornered and has integrity they will come out fighting. Whilst the enquiry did some damage, further disclosures by Dr Kelly would probably have destroyed Blairs Government. I have no doubts he was murdered, at the behest of who? Make your own minds up.

- Robert Feal-Martinez, Swindon, England


I totally agree with the above as I considered from the first sighting of the Hutton report that it was complete whitewash. I was also appalled at the manner of questioning when Dr Kelly was before the original committee. Those who questioned him ought to hang their heads in shame.

- J.Fleming, St.Neot, Cambs.


I agree with Mr Baker too many things dont add up. Sadly I doubt if the truth will ever come out and we have lost a very clever man to help keep this trash running the country in office. It is my opinion that they where afraid of what may come out through Dr Kelly so he was killed like many of our troops on Blairs orders in a unjust war.

- K Harrop, herts;


Yes, let's have an independant enquiry, Mr Baker should press for this. If the Government have nothing to hide then they have everything to gain.

- Brian, England


This case just stinks from top to bottom.

- Gordon Myatt, Swansea UK


If it was not suicide, then it can only have been a murder! If it was murder, who would have the motive and opportunity?
Doesn't bear thinking about does it.

- Thomas, Dubai


Dr Kelly had the 'guts' to speak out. That alone makes nonsense of his so called suicide.

I feel so sad for his family.

- Molly, Oxford


We will never know what actually happened but one thing is for sure, with such a corrupt Goverment in place, anything is possible.

- B.Baker, Spalding, England


I've always believed this scientist was murdered by the establishment. Tony Blair was proved a liar when he denied he had anything to do with the naming of this man and then admitted it under pressure from a journalist. Like this lying incompetent government the whole thing is a charade!

- Brian James, Alhaurin El Grande, Spain


I agree that the Inquest into David Kelly's death should be re-opened. The Hutton Inquiry was a total whitewash. The two people who discovered David Kelly's body stated it was slumped against a tree. Shortly after the discovery three policemen appeared who were not part of the official search team. The three policemen stayed with the body until more police arrived. From then on everyone who saw the body stated it to be in a supine position with the head at the base of the tree. Why had the body been moved? At the Hutton Inquiry one of the three policemen stated there was only one other person with him. Who was the third person? The two paramedics who attended the site were concerned about the lack of blood at the scene. There are too many inconsitencies concerning this case, so keep on pushing Mr Baker.

- Stuart Jessop, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England


Just another cover up by the 'mafia' of a government. How much longer are we going to put up with lies and deciet?

- Jacqueline Butterworth, England


Only a haemophiliac would bleed to death from a severed artery in the wrist. The body has wonderful mechanisms in place to deal with that type of injury and would have stopped the bleeding very quickly indeed. To my mind the crucial, yet unanswered question is, 'How much blood did Dr Kelly actually lose'? The painkillers certainly didn't kill him therefore the area around him would have had to be positively swimming in blood.

- Midge Curry, Bakewell, England


There is definitely more than reasonable doubt that Doctor Kelly's death was suspicious.

- Frank Sweeney, Chalgrove Oxfordshire


It's very doubtful if the general public will ever find out the true facts surrounding David Kelly's death.
The whole thing stinks of a cover up from on high. Blair and his cronies picked Hutton to lead the investigation into the death was because they knew he would reach the "right" conclusion.

- Stratford, Hants.


This is most likely another example of what I know as "the time value of the truth".

Most enquiries of this nature are now aimed at simply putting off the time when the truth might out. That is why semi-competent procrastinators are usually chosen to lead them (with as little knowledge of the issues as possible), difficulties are thrown in the way about access to witnesses etc. The theory is that a holding exercise will satisfy the great British public and it usually does. By the time a report is produced, many people have forgotten the issues. Lots of rumblings take place, but a form of investigation has been followed.

Then several years later the truth starts to seep out. But it is usually too late for a real investigation to take place and the guilty get away with it.

That is our cynical shadowy democracy in action and how many times have we seen it recently? Until we manage to recover our democracy we are probably all at risk.

- Tom, Bedfordshire
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 1:46 pm    Post subject: Y'know... Reply with quote

Y'know... I can't help but wonder that if the government in power was a Conservative one, whether all of those readers comments wouldn't have read something like:-

"Well of course he killed himself, he was obviously under a lot of pressure...etc. What we don't need right now is bizarre, untenable conspiracy theories - all they'll do is distract us from the important matters that should concern us - like the War on Terror... etc."

Regards,
C.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2006 6:12 pm    Post subject: Re: More Media Reply with quote

Fintan wrote:
And the coverage continues in the Daily Mail today.

This article had comments from the Mail's unwashed masses.

I say it "had" because if you go to the article online now you will
find ZERO comments. That's right. Nobody has yet commented, says the Daily Mail website. Eh?

Quote:
Reader comments (0)
No comments have so far been submitted. Why not be the first to send us your thoughts?

What about the 26 comments you can read below from an earlier saved version of the page?

Gone.
It was a bit too much for the Mail apparently.
Truth is fine ---but only in small doses.


Ahh Fintan, that is strange. I just tried to comment on the article myself and I got :

Quote:
Error 500--Internal Server Error
From RFC 2068 Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1:
10.5.1 500 Internal Server Error

The server encountered an unexpected condition which prevented it from fulfilling the request.


Maybe they don't want people commenting, or maybe its a temporary thing, we'll see soon enough.

Actually, I just commented on another article on the daily mail website and it went through without any trouble, it only seems to be the Dr Kelly one which seems to be 'broken'.
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