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"The Trigger Effect" -- true genesis for 9/11?
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Ormond



Joined: 14 Apr 2006
Posts: 1556
Location: Belly of the Beast, Texas

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Scandinavian Airlines Flight 911


...on James Burke's 80's program about the NY power outage in 1965.

Jesus jumpin' BALD HEADED CHRIST, Hocus!

Damnation. What would we do without ya?!

Thanks for finding this.

(The program's original content is worth thinking about too...)

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Wu Li



Joined: 20 Feb 2007
Posts: 573

PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 1:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ormond wrote:
Quote:
Scandinavian Airlines Flight 911


...on James Burke's 80's program about the NY power outage in 1965.

Jesus jumpin' BALD HEADED CHRIST, Hocus!

Damnation. What would we do without ya?!

Thanks for finding this.

(The program's original content is worth thinking about too...)


Yes it is and maybe you should find the works dispensed by Mr. Burke.
I have all the seasons now of connections.
I think they are very interesting.

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Wu Li



Joined: 20 Feb 2007
Posts: 573

PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2007 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's funny because I have now watched the whole first season and it has shown to be very intriguing.
In one of the episodes he speaks explicitly about suitcase nukes.
I am to young and no doubt ignorant because I thought of this as an event that came out much later.

Gotta read up a little bit more. I think I have been paying attention to much to the earlier part of the century. this forum has given me new found interests.

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Hocus Locus



Joined: 22 Sep 2006
Posts: 850
Location: Lost in anamnesis, cannot forget my way out

PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2007 1:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wu Li wrote:
Gotta read up a little bit more. I think I have been paying attention too much to the earlier part of the century. this forum has given me new found interests.

James Burke is a treasure. Two more authors,

David Kahn
The Codebreakers
(Note: You want the unabridged original hardcover edition if you can get it)

James Bamford
The Puzzle Palace: Inside the National Security Agency, America's Most Secret Intelligence Organization
Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency
A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies

'Codebreakers' is, bar few, one of the greatest rides out there. Kahn covers both topic and the personalities involved (these are the geeks of yesterday after all), and the original in-wartime alliances and pursuits that evolved to become the uniform, suit and T-shirt and jeans wearing intelligence enclaves of today.

And the things James Bamford has written over the years have astounded me. Call him a 'mainstream spook-source'. He is the quintessential limited hang out journalist, and I'm convinced that the reason he's been 'allowed' to write some of the things he has written, often coming from off-cuff interviews of retired folk, is ensure a brain trust of young minds out there ripe for recruitment and harvest.

For example, in Body of Secrets he covers the sad case of the attack on the USS Liberty in great detail. He leaves the torch-bearing and lynching to the mob... and just lays it out such as it had never been before.

I have not read his latest, Pretext for War, and from the reviews I can already see it lays out a 'stovepipe' scenario such as that presented in the BBC's "The Power of Nightmares" -- with a fair amount of bungle-assumptions of the kind that intelligence agencies love to put out there. Body of Secrets and Pretext are also post-9/11 works... I'm not convinced bungling is the whole story, it makes such excellent cover...

Even savvy journalists are reliant on the quality and openness of their sources, and that quality has diminished somewhat. But Bamford is clever, and if there is any message to be found by reading between the lines... I'm confident it would be found in his writing.

___
"The only thing that you can [infer] from that is that it is an extremely broadbanded capability that they have," Watters says in a soft Georgia accent. "They would not need to have a receive only circuit capability to the extent that this provides if they were simply receiving messages over Western Union or telex or what-ever. This implies that they are scanning, continuously, thousands of circuits all over the country."

The telecommunications specialist, who had at one time worked for AT&T's engineering arm, Western Electric, made the same point when he was a witness, on February 8, 1978, before the Senate Intelligence Committee. "It is understandable that radio and television, weather and press wire communications services, would require only one-way circuits," he said. "It is not understandable that the National Security Agency would require thousands of times the circuit capacity of the world's press services combined, AP, UPI, Reuters, et cetera, except that these one-way circuits are thousands of remote wiretaps!"

Another indication of NSA's "broadband sweeping of multi-circuited domestic telecommunications trunk lines," Watters told the senators, [in 1978!] lies in the Agency's request for an amendment to the wiretap law that would permit NSA to engage in warrantless wiretapping "for the sole purpose of determining the capability of equipment" when such "test period shall be limited... to... ninety days." Continuing, he warned: "Let there be no misunderstanding here. There is only one category of wiretapping equipment or system which requires up to ninety days for test and adjustment, and that system is broadband electronic eavesdropping equipment, the vacuum-cleaner approach to intelligence gathering, the general search of microwave trunk lines. I make this assertion on the strength of actual experience in the electronic intelligence trade and on the strength of over twenty-five years' experience in the telecommunications profession. An ordinary, single-line wire tap requires only five minutes to adjust and test."

Although some microwave testing may be done by engineers in NSA research and development spaces in the floors below the big white golf ball at FANX, most of it, apparently, is conducted in the utmost secrecy at a mosquito-filled swamp on Kent Island in the Chesapeake Bay...


~Double duh-hickey -- if you build it, they will come: From James Bamford's 'Puzzle Palace' -- published in 1982
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obeylittle



Joined: 10 Sep 2006
Posts: 442
Location: Middle o' Mitten, Michigan Corp. division of United States of America Corp. division of Global Corp.

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WTC equipped Otis elevators info:

Quote:

History of Elevators
From ancient times through the Middle Ages, and into the 13th century, man or animal power was the driving force behind hoisting devices.

By 1850 steam and hydraulic elevators had been introduced, but it was in 1852 that the landmark event in elevator history occurred: the invention of the world's first safety elevator by Elisha Graves Otis.

The first passenger elevator was installed by Otis in New York in 1857. After Otis' death in 1861, his sons, Charles and Norton, built on his heritage, creating Otis Brothers & Co. in 1867.

By 1873 over 2,000 Otis elevators were in use in office buildings, hotels and department stores across America, and five years later the first Otis hydraulic passenger elevator was installed.

The Era of the Skyscraper followed.... and in 1889 Otis revealed the first successful direct-connected geared electric elevator machines.

In 1898 overseas business had added to the company's growth, and Otis Brothers merged with 14 other elevator entities to form the Otis Elevator Company.

In 1903 Otis introduced the design that would become the "backbone" of the elevator industry: the gearless traction electric elevator, engineered and proven to outlast the building itself. This ushered in the age of high-rise structures, ultimately including New York's Empire State Building and World Trade Center, Chicago's John Hancock Center, and Toronto's CN Tower.

Throughout all these years, Otis innovations in automatic controls have included the Signal Control System, Peak Period Control, the Otis Autotronic System, and Multiple Zoning. Otis is a world leader in developing computer technology, and the company has revolutionized elevator controls, generating dramatic improvements in elevator response time and ride quality.

How Elevators Work

In a geared or gearless traction system (used in mid-rise and high-rise installations, respectively), the elevator car is supported in a hoistway by several steel hoist ropes, usually two sheaves, and a counterweight. The weight of the car and counterweight provides sufficient traction between the sheaves and the hoist ropes so that the sheaves can grip the hoist ropes and move and hold the car without excessive slipping. The car and counterweights ride along vertical guide rails to keep them from swaying.

The machinery to drive the elevator is located in a machine room usually directly above the elevator hoistway. To feed electricity to the car and receive electrical signals from it, a multi-wire electrical cable connects the machine room to the car. The end attached to the car moves with it, so the cable is called the "traveling cable."

A geared machine has a higher-speed motor, and the drive sheave is connected to the motor shaft through gears in a gear box, which reduce the rotational speed of the motor shaft to a lower drive-sheave speed. The gearless machine has a slow speed motor, and the drive sheave is connected directly to the motor shaft.

In a hydraulic system (used primarily in low-rise installations, where moderate car speed is acceptable), a car is connected to the top of a long piston that moves up and down in a cylinder. The car moves up when oil is pumped into the cylinder from a reservoir, raising the piston. The car is lowered when the oil returns to the reservoir.

The lifting action can be direct (piston connected to the car) or roped (piston attached to car via ropes). In both methods, the work done by the motor pump (kinetic energy) to lift the car to a higher elevation gives the car the ability to do work (potential energy). This energy transfer occurs each time the car is raised. When the car is lowered, the potential energy is used up, and the energy cycle is complete. The up and down motions of the elevator car are controlled by the hydraulic valve.



More info at Otis.com
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duane



Joined: 07 Mar 2007
Posts: 554
Location: western pennsylvania

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2007 2:33 pm    Post subject: areThe Real Terrorists running out of ideas? Reply with quote

may 30, 2007 USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2007-05-09-deviant-thinkers-security_N.html?csp=34

"Looking to prevent the next terrorist attack, the homeland security department is tapping into the wild imagination of a group of self-described "deviant" thinkers: science-fiction writers"


maybe someone a little more computer savvy could paste the article




afterall flying planes into buildings is sooo 20th century
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stallion4



Joined: 26 May 2006
Posts: 692

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2007 3:23 pm    Post subject: Re: areThe Real Terrorists running out of ideas? Reply with quote

duane wrote:
may 30, 2007 USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2007-05-09-deviant-thinkers-security_N.html?csp=34

"Looking to prevent the next terrorist attack, the homeland security department is tapping into the wild imagination of a group of self-described "deviant" thinkers: science-fiction writers"


maybe someone a little more computer savvy could paste the article




afterall flying planes into buildings is sooo 20th century

Looks like they changed the link on ya, duane. Here's the new one:

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2007-05-29-deviant-thinkers-security_N.htm

Quote:
Sci-fi writers join war on terror
By Mimi Hall, USA TODAY


Clockwise from top left, Jerry Pournelle, Arlan Andrews, Greg Bear, Larry Niven and Sage Walker are science ficion writers that attended a Homeland Security conference. They are part of a group Andrews put together called Sigma with the motto "Science Fiction in the National Interest."
Looking to prevent the next terrorist attack, the Homeland Security Department is tapping into the wild imaginations of a group of self-described "deviant" thinkers: science-fiction writers.

"We spend our entire careers living in the future," says author Arlan Andrews, one of a handful of writers the government brought to Washington this month to attend a Homeland Security conference on science and technology.

Those responsible for keeping the nation safe from devastating attacks realize that in addition to border agents, police and airport screeners, they "need people to think of crazy ideas," Andrews says.

The writers make up a group called Sigma, which Andrews put together 15 years ago to advise government officials. The last time the group gathered was in the late 1990s, when members met with government scientists to discuss what a post-nuclear age might look like, says group member Greg Bear. He has written 30 sci-fi books, including the best seller Darwin's Radio.

Now, the Homeland Security Department is calling on the group to help with the government's latest top mission of combating terrorism.
FIND MORE STORIES IN: Homeland Security Department | Andrews | Science fiction

Although some sci-fi writers' futuristic ideas might sound crazy now, scientists know that they often have what seems to be an uncanny ability to see into the future.

"Fifty years ago, science-fiction writers told us about flying cars and a wireless handheld communicator," says Christopher Kelly, spokesman for Homeland Security's Science and Technology division. "Although flying cars haven't evolved, cellphones today are a way of life. We need to look everywhere for ideas, and science-fiction writers clearly inform the debate."

Bear says the writers offer powerful imaginations that can conjure up not only possible methods of attack, but also ideas about how governments and individuals will respond and what kinds of high-tech tools could prevent attacks.

The group's motto is "Science Fiction in the National Interest." To join the group, Andrews says, you have to have at least one technical doctorate degree.

"We're well-qualified nuts," says Jerry Pournelle, co-author of the best sellers Footfall and Lucifer's Hammer and dozens of other books.

Pournelle and others say that science-fiction writers have spent their lives studying the kinds of technologies and scenarios Homeland Security officials have been tackling since the department began operating in 2003.

"We talk to a lot of strange people and read a lot of weird things," Bear says.

At the Washington conference, Bear offered to put biometrics researchers in touch with movie special-effects experts. The experts might be able to help the government determine how to match the face of someone walking through an airport to a grainy photo of a known terrorist.

Bear's latest book, Quantico, is a sci-fi thriller that has FBI agents and a bioterrorism expert racing to hunt down a homegrown terrorist.

"We'll play 'What if?' with anything," says Sage Walker, an emergency medicine physician turned sci-fi writer and the only woman in the group. She says the discussions with government officials "tend to be very intense and far-ranging."

So are discussions between the writers. During a coffee break at the conference, Walker, Bear and Andrews started talking about the government's bomb-sniffing dogs. Within minutes, they had conjured up a doggie brain-scanning skullcap that could tell agents what kind of explosive material a dog had picked up.

The 9/11 Commission called the 2001 terrorist attacks a result of the government's "failure of imagination." For this group, Walker says, there's no such thing as an "unthinkable scenario."

Why offer their ideas to the government instead of private companies that pay big bucks?

"To save civilization," Ringworld author Larry Niven says. "We do it in fiction. Why wouldn't we want to do it in fact?"

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