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Afghanistan - Pakistan : Latest Developments
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Fintan
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A picture is worth a thousand words.

This video, prepared from the Wikileaks Afghanistan
data, tells the story of the Afghan war since 2005.

You can see which way it's going.

Quote:

It starts off slow, but the longer you wait, the more furious the attacks.

The green explosions are ones in which no one was hurt,
yellow ones are injuries only, and red ones are fatal IEDs.

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duane



Joined: 07 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi Fintan,

IEDs used to be called landmines

it's sadly ironic that the US can't complain about them since they refuse to sign the treaty to ban them

http://www.globalissues.org/article/79/landmines

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bri



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PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2010 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

duane wrote:

IEDs used to be called landmines


Kinda, but from talking to vets in my experience
it's a whole 'nother ball game. What you think is
a 'dead dog' could very well be a 'landmine'.
'Insurgents' are dare I say smart, even if brutal.
They are defending after all, no?

Doug Stanhope wrote:

If you attack me, I'm a weaker country, I will use any weapon I have...chemical weapon, nuclear weapon, girly eye-gouge, sucker nut punch, dogshit in a wrist-rocket... Whatever is going to keep you away from me!
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Fintan
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 17, 2010 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here we go again with this game of pretending that
Obama is facing hardliners in the military who
will prevent Afghan withdrawal. Spin. Spin.

66 more GI's killed in July.

Of course you knew that.
It's been all over the media. NOT.

Quote:
Gen Petraeus casts doubt on July 2011
deadline for Afghan withdrawal


By Toby Harnden in Washington
Published: 7:38PM BST 15 Aug 2010

General David Petraeus, the new commander of Nato troops in Afghanistan,
has cast doubt on Barack Obama's July 2011 deadline to start withdrawing
coalition forces.


The US president and David Cameron have both said a significant
drawdown of troops would begin in 11 months’ time. But Gen Petraeus
appeared unconvinced, saying he would “certainly” advise Mr Obama if
he thought the goal was unrealistic.

In his first major interview since assuming command of more than
140,000 coalition forces in Afghanistan last month, he said the reality
“on the ground” would dictate whether it was possible.

In what may be interpreted as a challenge to Mr Obama, Gen Petraeus
praised President George W Bush for making the “tough call” and “very
courageous decision” in ordering the Iraq troop surge and sticking with it
despite “a number of difficult months”.

Gen Petraeus, who took command of the Afghan mission last month, was
speaking in an interview with NBC’s Meet the Press. Support for the war
and Mr Obama’s handling of it are at an all-time low, while the monthly
death toll for American troops hit a record high of 66 in July.....

Link

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Sasha



Joined: 12 Jul 2010
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Location: Caribbean (kar-uh-bee-uhn) of Canada

PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2010 9:38 pm    Post subject: US Escalates Air War Over Afghanistan Reply with quote

US Escalates Air War Over Afghanistan
Wired
August 30, 2010 - The American military has retooled its most potent technological advantage — dominance of the skies — for the Afghanistan campaign. But so far, at least, the boost in air power doesn’t seem to have shifted the war’s momentum back to the American-led coalition. An influx of Reaper drones and executive-jets-turned-spy-planes allowed U.S. forces to fly 9,700 surveillance sorties over Afghanistan in the first seven months of 2010. Last year, American planes conducted 3,645 of the flights during a similar period.


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Fintan
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 31, 2010 1:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another 7 US Troops just killed in Afghanistan,
in addition to the 7 killed over the weekend.


Quote:

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Fintan
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Afghans try to extract fuel from a lorry attacked on
the Kabul-to-Kandahar road - AFP/Getty Images


Exclusive:
Afghanistan - behind enemy lines


James Fergusson returns after three years to Chak, just 40 miles from
Kabul, to find the Taliban's grip is far stronger than the West will admit


Sunday, 14 November 2010

The sound of a propeller engine is audible the moment my fixer and I climb out of the car, causing us new arrivals from Kabul to glance sharply upwards.

I have never heard a military drone in action before, and it is entirely invisible in the cold night sky, yet there is no doubt what it is. My first visit to the Taliban since 2007 has only just begun and I am already regretting it. What if the drone is the Hellfire-missile-carrying kind?

Three years ago, the Taliban's control over this district, Chak, and the 112,000 Pashtun farmers who live here, was restricted to the hours of darkness – although the local commander, Abdullah, vowed to me that he would soon be in full control. As I am quickly to discover, this was no idle boast.

In Chak, the Karzai government has in effect given up and handed over to the Taliban. Abdullah, still in charge, even collects taxes. His men issue receipts using stolen government stationery that is headed "Islamic Republic of Afghanistan"; with commendable parsimony they simply cross out the word "Republic" and insert "Emirate", the emir in question being the Taliban's spiritual leader, Mullah Omar.

The most astonishing thing about this rebel district – and for Nato leaders meeting in Lisbon this week, a deeply troubling one – is that Chak is not in war-torn Helmand or Kandahar but in Wardak province, a scant 40 miles south-west of Kabul.

Nato commanders have repeatedly claimed that the Taliban are on the back foot following this year's US troop surge. Mid-level insurgency commanders, they say, have been removed from the battlefield in "industrial" quantities since the 2010 campaign began.

And yet Abdullah, operating within Katyusha rocket range of the capital – and with a $500,000 bounty on his head – has managed to evade coalition forces for almost four years.

If Chak is in any way typical of developments in other rural districts – and Afghanistan has hundreds of isolated valley communities just like this one – then Nato's military strategy could be in serious difficulty.


At the roadside, Abdullah himself materialises from the darkness. He seems hugely amused to see me again. The drone, thankfully, turns out to be a ringay – the local, onomatopoeic nickname for a small camera drone. Abdullah says it's the armed versions, the larger-engined Predators and Reapers, known as buzbuzak, that we need to worry about – and this definitely isn't one of those. I imagine some CIA analyst in Langley, Virginia, freeze-framing a close-up of my face and filing it under "Insurgent". In this valley, no one but the Taliban moves about in vehicles after dark.

In the middle of the night, after supper on the floor of a village farmhouse, I am taken by half a dozen Talibs to inspect the local district centre, a mud-brick compound garrisoned by 80 soldiers of the Afghan National Army who, Abdullah says, are too scared ever to come out.

"We attack them whenever we like," he says, producing Russian-made night vision glasses and examining the ANA's forward trench positions. "In fact, we can attack them now if you want. Would you like that?" I politely decline the offer.


Kabul, Abdullah insists, controls just one square kilometre around the district centre; the rest of Chak belongs to the Taliban. "Last year, 30 ANP [Afghan National Police] came over to our side with two trucks full of heavy weapons... They could see how popular we were here, and that they were following the wrong path. They were all from the north. We sent them home to their villages."

During this September's parliamentary elections, he adds with pride, 86 of the province's 87 polling stations remained closed. A local candidate, Wahedullah Kalimzai, has since been accused of bribing election officials to stuff the ballot boxes in the one polling station that did open. "And Kabul has the temerity to call these elections a success!"

A former engineering student at a Kabul polytechnic, Abdullah has also become a champion military truck burner since 2007. The eastern edge of Chak is delineated by the Kabul-to-Kandahar highway, a key supply route for the Nato war machine in the south. Repaved by the US just seven years ago at a cost of $190m, the road today is pockmarked with craters left by improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Over the years, he says, his men have destroyed "hundreds" of Isaf (International Security Assistance Force) vehicles on this stretch. His personal record is a convoy of 81 fuel trucks ambushed in a single, memorable night.

"We were scared of the Americans at first," says Abdullah's deputy, Mullah Naim. "We heard they had technology so powerful that they could see a mouse blink from space. But none of that turned out to be true."

This is not to say that the Taliban are not cautious. The Americans, Abdullah admits, have come close to catching or killing him more times than he can count. He issues his orders over a field radio and several mobile phones, on none of which he speaks for more than about a minute. He and his men seldom stop anywhere for long: in the 24 hours I spent with them we changed location six times, sometimes on foot, sometimes by car and, once, on a pair of Chinese motorbikes. Taking photographs of them is out of the question.

Their greatest concern is the risk of betrayal by "spies". That night, indeed, three strangers are arrested further up the valley after they were allegedly spotted taking pictures on their mobile phones. At 6am, after consulting by phone with Taliban headquarters in Pakistan, Abdullah announces that they will be tried by the local sharia judge – an official appointed, like him, by HQ – and that the three can expect to be hanged if found guilty. I ask if he has identified any enemies in Chak using data from Julian Assange's WikiLeaks website, which he knows all about. "Not yet, because there are no computers here," he replies, "but headquarters is still analysing the material... We have already learned a great deal, in general, about the way Isaf operates."


The atmosphere in Chak, perhaps unsurprisingly, feels oppressive and a little paranoid. No Western journalist has been to see these Taliban since my last visit, and they are careful not to advertise my presence unnecessarily now, insisting that I swathe my face in a woollen patou when we go outside. The community, self-contained even in normal times, has been cut off from the rest of the country for three years.

The confusing maze of dirt tracks at the valley's entrance is frequently seeded with IEDs which travellers must deactivate and reactivate by punching a code into a mobile phone.

The only way in for invaders is by helicopter, therefore – and since the summer, US special forces have launched airborne kill or capture raids in the district "almost every night". Sentries posted on mountaintops all around remain on permanent lookout for unusual helicopter activity: often the first sign of another night raid, and a signal for the Taliban to take to the hills themselves.

The effect of these night raids on Abdullah's command structure has been negligible, but the same cannot be said for the effect on public opinion. Dozens of blameless locals have allegedly been killed by "the Americans".

Abdullah reels off a list of fatal incidents in the last two months alone – a taxi-driver here, a farmer asleep in his orchard there, three students trying to get home to their families over there – and it is clear that these attacks have done nothing but bolster support for the insurgents.

"Thousands of people turn out at the funerals of our martyrs and chant 'Death to America'," one Talib tells me. This may be an exaggeration, but there is no arguing with what has happened at the bomb-shattered farmer's house that I am later taken to see. The apple tree outside is freshly festooned with strips of green cloth – the mark of a spontaneous local shrine.

Abdullah and his men seem to thrive under the threat of sudden death, as though infected by a kind of joie de guerre. He says it is the ambition of all of them to die as ghazi – that is, as martyrs, in battle against the infidel.

"It is our religious duty to resist you foreigners," he tells me – just as he did in 2007. "You must understand that we will never stop fighting you – never."

The prospect of a negotiated peace is dismissed almost outright. "All this talk of a political settlement with Karzai... it is all tricks and propaganda," he says. "The Taliban will not negotiate with anyone until all foreign troops have left."

His men are genuinely perplexed by General Petraeus's assertion that Nato's purpose in Afghanistan is to prevent the re-establishment of al-Qa'ida.

"There were some foreign fighters in Chak for a while last year," Mullah Naim recalls, "Arabs, Chechens, Pakistanis. But they were fighting under the Taliban, obeying our orders. They were nothing to do with al-Qa'ida."

"There are no al-Qa'ida fighters in Afghanistan any more. I have fought in the south and in the east as well as here. In seven years of operations I have not seen a single al-Qa'ida fighter. Not one."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/exclusive-afghanistan--behind-enemy-lines-2133667.html

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Last edited by Fintan on Sat Nov 13, 2010 9:06 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Fintan
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

An Afghan soldier stands guard during a clash with
Taliban fighters near Jalalabad airport, east of Kabul


Across Afghanistan, a string of
deadly attacks; at least 19 dead


By the CNN Wire Staff - November 13, 2010

Kabul, Afghanistan (CNN) -- Violence tore through Afghanistan on Saturday in three deadly insurgent attacks, authorities said.

In the south, three international service members were killed. NATO's International Security Assistance Force. The command wouldn't say precisely where the event occurred and identify the nationalities of the troops.

The incident followed an earlier attack in Kunduz province, where a motorcycle bomb detonated in a market, killing at least 10 people, including three children in what the country's Interior Minister called an "un-Islamic and inhumane action." There were 18 people injured as well in the northern province.

ISAF denounced the strike and said insurgents are continuing "to engage in indiscriminate attacks which put Afghan civilians in harm's way" -- despite guidance from the Afghan Taliban leadership's to its fighters to avoid civilian casualties.

ISAF said that since the beginning of the month, "insurgents have engaged in at least 47 acts of indiscriminate violence" in civilian areas.

In Nangarhar province, located in the east, insurgents attacked an ISAF observation post at the Jalalabad airport, and six of the alleged attackers were killed by Afghan and foreign troops.

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/11/13/afghanistan.violence/?hpt=T2

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bri



Joined: 16 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Longer than the Soviets now!...

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2010/11/ap_us-afghanistan-soviets-112510/
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duane



Joined: 07 Mar 2007
Posts: 554
Location: western pennsylvania

PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2010 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

did someone try to rip his heart out? Shocked

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/12/13/politics/main7146885.shtml


Richard Holbrooke, Famed U.S. Diplomat, Dies
Obama's Envoy to Pakistan and Afghanistan Passes After Emergency Surgery to Fix Torn Aorta



The president's diplomatic point man on the Afghanistan war, Holbrooke was stricken Friday while at the State Department and was rushed to the hospital, where he underwent more than 20 hours of surgery to repair the tear and bleeding in his aorta.

The State Department said Sunday that he received calls from Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari. As President Barack Obama's special envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan, the longtime diplomat has made numerous visits to the region.

Holbrooke was meeting with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton about midmorning Friday when he fell ill, collapsed
and was rushed to the hospital a few blocks away.

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Fintan
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think she just jabbed her
vampire fangs into his heart is all......

Meanwhile....

Quote:
Asked whether he considers himself a partner with the United States,
Karzai said "it depends on how you define a partner in America."


"I will speak for Afghanistan, and I will speak for the Afghan interest,
but I will seek that Afghan interest in connection with and together with
an American interest and in partnership with America," he said.

"In other words, if you're looking for a stooge
and calling a stooge a partner, no.

If you're looking for a partner, yes."


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/12/12/AR2010121


Also Meanwhile:

Quote:
"Every day that passes, the security situation is getting worse.
The government is not in a position to bring peace. Every day,
the Taliban are getting more powerful than the government."


- Sayed Rahmat, a 27-year-old shopkeeper
in Ghazni province in eastern Afghanistan



In northern Afghanistan, security has been deteriorating for the past two years in Kunduz and surrounding provinces, hideouts for the Taliban, al-Qaida and fighters from other militant factions, including the Haqqani network.

Using Badghis province as a hub, the Taliban also have spread their influence in western Afghanistan and now control several districts....

According to a quarterly report by the coalition, number of Afghans who rate their security situation as "bad" is the highest since the nationwide survey began in September 2008. This downward trend is likely a result of the steady rise in violence since the beginning of the year, the report said.

"The situation on the ground is much worse than a year ago because the Taliban insurgency has made progress across the country," more than 30 academics, aid workers and others working in Afghanistan wrote in an open letter to Obama last week.

"It is now very difficult to work outside the cities or even move around Afghanistan by road. The insurgents have built momentum, exploiting the shortcomings of the Afghan government and the mistakes of the coalition."

http://yhoo.it/hIOyl8

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duane



Joined: 07 Mar 2007
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Location: western pennsylvania

PostPosted: Sat Dec 25, 2010 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

what I wanted but didn't get for Christmas, I know it's $35,000+ but it would be great in my survival kit.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytPa8ihfrPU
XM25, military super weapon

but wait... maybe Santa knows something


http://www.alternet.org/world/149146/xm25_%27super_rifle%27_--_the_pentagon%27s_latest_toy_that_won%27t_do_anything_to_avoid_disaster_in_afghanistan/?page=entire


XM25 'Super Rifle' -- The Pentagon's Latest Toy That Won't Do Anything to Avoid Disaster in Afghanistan
Introducing the new super-weapon that will change absolutely nothing about why we're losing in Afghanistan.

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