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The Duodenum Diaries (Reprise)
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kathy
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
A Non-Human Primate Model for Gluten Sensitivity

Background and Aims
Gluten sensitivity is widespread among humans. For example, in celiac disease patients, an inflammatory response to dietary gluten leads to enteropathy, malabsorption, circulating antibodies against gluten and transglutaminase 2, and clinical symptoms such as diarrhea. There is a growing need in fundamental and translational research for animal models that exhibit aspects of human gluten sensitivity.

Methods
Using ELISA-based antibody assays, we screened a population of captive rhesus macaques with chronic diarrhea of non-infectious origin to estimate the incidence of gluten sensitivity. A selected animal with elevated anti-gliadin antibodies and a matched control were extensively studied through alternating periods of gluten-free diet and gluten challenge. Blinded clinical and histological evaluations were conducted to seek evidence for gluten sensitivity.

Results
When fed with a gluten-containing diet, gluten-sensitive macaques showed signs and symptoms of celiac disease including chronic diarrhea, malabsorptive steatorrhea, intestinal lesions and anti-gliadin antibodies. A gluten-free diet reversed these clinical, histological and serological features, while reintroduction of dietary gluten caused rapid relapse.

Conclusions
Gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques may be an attractive resource for investigating both the pathogenesis and the treatment of celiac disease.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2229647

Quote:
The Chorleywood Bread Process, invented in 1961, uses intense energy, chemical additives and large amounts of yeast to produce loaves in a very short time.... If dough is not allowed to ferment for several hours, there is little chance for natural bacteria to destroy harmful elements in the dough and to make important nutrients available to the human body.

Worse still, enzymes, often genetically modified, are added to flour and dough to make loaves bigger and keep them squishy for days, if not weeks, after baking. But most troubling of all, recent research suggests that one enzyme, transglutaminase, used in food manufacturing and baking, may actually turn some of the gliadin protein in wheat flour into a form that can be toxic to some people. Even the organic loaves made by the industrial bakers can contain this stuff.

The industry is keen to sell us 'premium' loaves with fashionable additions of omega-3, inulin, folic acid and the like. But if we don't attend to the innate quality of our wheat and flour, our diet will consist of little more than nutrified industrial slop.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2006/sep/17/comment.food
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Rumpl4skn



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back from the Spring Training Baseball road trip, so here are my updates:

Day 9 - Flying to Tampa, with a 2-hr stopover in Birmingham, AL. Didn't appear to be much in the way of diet-friendly choices, other than a banana. But at the other gate, I found a nice cranberry-pecan chicken salad that was excellent. All the dressing choices were corn-starchy, so I ate it dry.

For dinner, I talked my brother into hitting a supermarket, where I bought a 6-pack of Albacore tuna and a can opener, rice milk and some baby carrots. There's a mini-fridge in the room, so I'm all set.

Day 10 - Went to the ballpark, and there was almost nothing edible for me. Finally settled on a bun-less foot-long hot dog, and just traded a zillion fat calories for the absence of m-w-s-c. Made the mistake of drinking a Gatorade before I read the ingredients. Corn syrup, corn syrup and more corn syrup.

Day 11 - My Bro wants to eat at the Denny's next door, and I'm prepared for the worst. First, engaged in an intense conversation, I forgot myself and put half and half in my coffee, but only had 2 swigs of it before I realized what I'd done. Then I ordered a veggie omelet with no cheese, and it came stuffed with cheese. Was going to send it back, until I realized that all the veggies had been saute'ed in enough butter to gag a dead maggot (sorry, old expression from my childhood), so.... I pardoned the diet, scraped about half the cheese off (it was cheesier than a Wayne Newton show) and just ate it. Amazingly, about an hour and a half later I realized I had fallen asleep in the room watching television - something I hadn't done since I began this diet.

The next time I order something sans dairy, I will dishonestly specify that I am violently lactose intolerant, and if they don't want me projectile vomiting all over the floor, they had better keep the butter out of the omelet.

Had tuna for brunch with some rice milk. Headed out to the ballpark, and ate nothing but a few handfuls of peanuts. They were flavored with something, but no idea what it was.

Day 12
- Flying home, and had to be at Tampa airport by 5am. Nothing was open inside the terminal except the newsstand, and the only edible item was a small cup of cling peaches, and a bottle of V8. That worked fine, but I was amazed at the ingredients list of the "health bars" on the shelf.

Got home and chowed down gratefully on a gluten-free bagel with ghee butter, and more rice milk. Steamed veggies tonight - it's good to be home. Wink

(Btw: Kathy - I didn't chow down on the G&B bar that night, I was kidding. It's still on my desk here, and I'll had a few squares of it tonight.

The new posts here look great, going to dig into them later.)


Last edited by Rumpl4skn on Fri Mar 14, 2008 1:31 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Continuity



Joined: 16 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peanuts are a big no-no, from what I've gathered, Rump... Shocked
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Rumpl4skn



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Continuity wrote:
Peanuts are a big no-no, from what I've gathered, Rump... Shocked

I know they're a secondary allergen, but I ate them because they weren't on the "big 4 list", and there was literally nothing there to eat at all. They didn't even have plain hot dogs, just hot sausages, dripping with even more fat.

It was definitely a diet detour, but I figured a few peanuts were the lesser evil as far as fat calories. The day was a disaster for the GFCF diet anyway.
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Fintan
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Rumpl (or should I say guinea pig, lol), well done!

Yeah the peanuts are a no-no. In perspective, individuals vary, but
peanuts are almost as bad as wheat -especially digestively.
Quote:
You can check the constituients of many foods here:
http://breakfornews.com/nutrients/
or
http://www.foodcomp.dk/fcdb_alphlist.asp

Look for levels of aspartic and glutamic acid. Not for their digestive
effects - but their mental effects. Many meats are high in both. Though
that's a broader story, than the narrow digestive/autoimmune issues.

Quote:
Foods rich in glutamate and aspartate:

1 ) Grains: Wheat, barley, and oats are highest. Corn and rice are lower.

2 ) Dairy Products: Cheese is 20% glutamic acid by composition.

3 ) Beans: Soy, Pinto, lima, black, navy, and lentils.

4 ) Seeds: Sunflower, pumpkin, etc.

5 ) Peanuts: Very high, as are cashews, pistachios, and almonds.

6 ) Diet drinks: Primary source of aspartate (aspartame).

7 ) MSG: 70% of prepared foods and many soups have MSG.

8 ) Meats: All meats are naturally rich in glutamate and aspartate.
Lamb (& eggs) are lowest. Rabbit and turkey are the highest.


By the way, most vaccines contain processed free glutamic acid (MSG). lol

Besides the big four grains, other foods such as soy and many other
beans share the same profile and effects as wheat/rye/barley/corn/dairy.
This is down to lectins. I'll try pull something together on lectins soon.

The information in the book Dangerous Grains (posted by Kathy above)
is the wake-up call. Braly and Hoggan believe that the reaction to gluten
can cause problems almost anywhere in the body. Dr Alessio Fasano says
'out of intestine' problems are 15 times more frequent than 'in intestine'."

Consider the implications of that. Starting with this:

Quote:
Rumpl4skn: Amazingly, about an hour and a half later I realized
I had fallen asleep in the room watching television - something I hadn't
done since I began this diet.

Yeah well those are the gliadorphins kicking in. Best value, legal zonk-out
available today -unless you are already tolerant from daily consumption.

There's a downside to getting a wipe-out hit. Ask any junkie:

Quote:
The increased incidence of lymphoma in celiac sprue (CS) is well documented, and the risk of developing this malignancy is 40-100-fold greater than in the general population. The author believes that gluten may also be at the root of lymphomas in asymptomatic and latent celiac sprue, as well.

Several processes contribute to the effect that is herein hypothesized, including opioid attachment at the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA), and subsequent downregulation of production of natural killer cells. This may offer an explanation for our longstanding awareness that there is an 'impaired lymphocyte reactivity against tumor cells in patients with coeliac disease' which may also apply to first-degree relatives with the same HLA markers.
LINK


The downside: that 'opoid' hit hammers your 'natural killer' immune cells. Ouch!

The other thing about that link above is that it shows the long history of
celiac-diagnosed people having very high rates of some cancers. Lately,
leading researchers wonder if this is a side-effect or the MAIN effect!! :

Quote:
Antibodies contained in M component of some patients with multiple myeloma are directed to food antigens?

Multiple myeloma is malignant disease that is characterized in most patients, by the presence
in the serum of monoclonal gamma globulins, which in agarose gel after electrophoresis appear
as protein band of restricted mobility, M component. The aim of this study was to determine
are the antibodies contained in M-component directed to some antigen chronically present in
the organism, to some of food antigens.

Preliminary results showed..... that in sera of some patients with multiple myeloma antibodiesfrom
M-component could be directed to some of gliadin antigens. As the serum antigliadin immunoreactivity
is present in patients with gluten intolerance, celiac disease, it could be of importance to elucidate
is the multiple myeloma [a] more severe form of gluten intolerance than celiac disease.

LINK

Wow! Is this leukemia a MORE severe form of gluten intolerance? !!

So, now we are moving beyond the simplistic focus on gluten's effects on
the gut --the creation of permeability with consequent downstream effects......

Instead we are looking at gluten being digested with no major problem,
BUT having huge effects on many disease processes in the rest of
the body. That's how this could effect fifteen times as many people than would
be affected by well understood gut-gluten problems.

No wonder the hunter-gatherers' had brains on average 11% larger than
those of the farmrs who followed them. Ie larger than we do today.

Bear in mind that only 1 in 30 or 40 celiacs are ever diagnosed.

So if medicine can't even catch the simple celiac cases, the chances of
medicine spotting that these other disease process are being
generated by glutens is virtually NIL. We are on our own.

One final health note. Re: cancer. This is a big plus of quitting wheat/gluten.

Wheat consumption virtually halts the correct use of Vitamin D in the body,
within 20 minutes of consumption. (That's why wheat eaters are so white).

And Vitamin D is one of our best anti-cancer protections:

Quote:
Scientists said analysis showed that, for at least some cancers, the vitamin D factor could not be ignored.

Taking 1,000 international units (IU) - or 25 micrograms - of the vitamin daily could lower an individual's
cancer risk by 50% in colon cancer, and by 30% in breast and ovarian cancer, they said.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4563336.stm


So if wiping out your vitamin D production while also zapping your natural
killer immune cells sound like a good cancer strategy, keep eating wheat!

Wink

One caution for all who dump the grains/dairy. After some weeks off this
stuff you will be very sensitive to the gliadorphins and casomorphins in
these foods. Even a tiny amount can have severe effets. I once had a two
hour involuntary 'nap' after just one handful of potato chips with MSG on them.

But I'm trivializing the potential effects. You can get quite ill and/or very
sleepy and/or psychologically unnerved by small exposures to these foods,
after you have been off them for some time.

So, read the small print on those food labels.

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They only function when open.


Last edited by Fintan on Sun Dec 27, 2015 2:09 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Fintan
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2008 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the vital audios:

Quote:
''The New Plague' Part 1'
Dr. John Symes
A breakthrough to rival the scurvy debacle? John Symes
decodes the causes of the new plague -with Fintan Dunne
LISTEN mp3

''The New Plague' Part 2'
LISTEN mp3

'Hidden Causes of Western Diseases'
A breakthrough on key foods that drive much of modern disease
Presented by Kathy McMahon & Fintan Dunne
LISTEN mp3


Here's What Made The
'Whites' Even Whiter:


Quote:
. . . . .

Quote:
Wheat Made The 'Whites' Even Whiter

By Fintan Dunne, 16th May, 2006

If you listened to our interview with Dr. John Symes you already know about the impact of glutens on the duodenum: triggering inflammation and impeding the ability to adsorb vital vitamims. Wheat gluten is one of the worst offenders. Now comes more bad news about wheat, from an unexpected direction.

Quote:
. .

Broadly speaking, skin tone lightens as one moves away from the equatorial lattitudes. But there is a curious anomaly.

Scandanavian and Nothern Germanic people have the characteristic white palor. However, the Inuit people of the Artic Circle and the Sami of Lapland --despite being at similar or higher latitude-- have a darker tone. Understanding why ends up being unexpectedly informative.

Frank W Sweet is an expert in racial history who has examined the Paleo-Etiology of Human Skin Tone.

He describes how the warming effect of the Gulf stream enabled Northern Europeans in the Baltic Sea region to switch their diet from vitamin-D-rich meat to vitamin-D-deficient grain. Thus natural selection made them lose skin pigmentation in order to extract more vitamin D from sunlight. By contrast the Inuit and Sami remained on a meat diet and retained their natural skin palor.

But besides that switch from meat to wheat and other grains, there was another key driver of paleness. Paleolitic diet proponent, Dr. Loren Cordain, of Colorado State University, has investigated the biochemistry of all this. His team's found that wheat contains a protein that diminishes vitamin D functionality within the cells of our body.

Here's an extract from Cordain's correspondance with racial historian Sweet:


Quote:
Wheat contains an antinutrient called wheat germ agglutinin (WGA).... a lectin that binds cellular glycoproteins. Once in the gut, WGA binds to a luminal facing hormone receptor called the epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGF-R ). Upon binding the EGF-R, WGA is internalized and this trancytotic pathway is how WGA penetrates the gut barrier which normally prevents almost all intact proteins entry into the body.

Once in gut cells (enterocytes) WGA gains access to the circulation via the lymph and is not removed from circulation by the liver or by gamma globulins.

Hence, within an hour of consumption WGA is found in plasma in physiological meaningful concentrations (as high as 5ug/ml). Because EGF-R are found on virtually all cells in the body, WGA now can enter the cellular compartment of all cells in the body. Once within cells, WGA wreaks more havoc by binding a structure called the nuclear pore and thereby impedes or prevents the cytosolic transport of the vitamin D receptor and its ligand (1,25 hydroxyvitamin D3) to the nucleus which results in impaired vitamin D utilization and systemically will result in rickets if high dietary levels of whole wheat are chronically consumed.

In adult females rickets ...dramatically increases mortality during childbirth. Hence, the adoption of whole wheat staples in Neolithic Northern European populations represented a powerful selection pressure which caused natural selection to chose genes which could overcome the rachitogenic effects of whole wheat.


Bear in mind that the conventional wisdom is that we should avoid the kind of sun exposure which would power the skin's vitamin D production. And note that the western diet is alarmingly high in wheat content.

In the light of wheat's impairment of circulating vitamin D3 utilization at the cellular level, this mix of sun avoidance and wheat consumption make for a rather deadly combination.

Our advice is to dismiss the skin cancer hype. Vitamin D's cancer prevention qualities far outweigh any downside from non-burning exposure to the sun. And it plays a vital role in the uptake of other necessary vitamins.

Of course, all this is another good reason to minimize or eliminate wheat from your diet.


Full Coments by Dr. Cordain:

Quote:
Dr. Loren Cordain wrote:

Hi Frank,

Thank you so much for such a detailed response. The reason I ask is that our research group has come to a similar conclusion that you have suggested regarding the specific selective pressure (the consumption of cereal grains) which simultaneously selected for adult lactase persistence and extreme dermal depigmentation in Northern European populations. We have worked out the molecular biology of this mechanism. Briefly it goes like this:

Wheat contains an antinutrient called wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). WGA is a protein molecule known as a lectin that binds carbohydrates and is routinely used by molecular biologist to track events in cells because of it's ability to bind cellular glycoproteins. Whole wheat flour contains between 30-50 mg WGA/kg flour. Upon consumption of whole wheat, WGA resists proteolytic gut enzymes and survives fully intact as it travels through the GI tract. Once in the gut, WGA binds to a luminal facing hormone receptor called the epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGF-R ). Upon binding the EGF-R, WGA is internalized and this trancytotic pathway is how WGA penetrates the gut barrier which normally prevents almost all intact proteins entry into the body. Almost all dietary proteins are broken down into their constituent amino acids prior to absorption. However, as I mentioned WGA resists the action of gut proteolases.

Once in gut cells (enterocytes) WGA gains access to the circulation via the lymph and is not removed from circulation by the liver or by gamma globulins. Hence, within an hour of consumption WGA is found in plasma in physiological meaningful concentrations (as high as 5ug/ml). Because EGF-R are found on virtually all cells in the body, WGA now can enter the cellular compartment of all cells in the body. Once within cells, WGA wreaks more havoc by binding a structure called the nuclear pore and thereby impedes or prevents the cytosolic transport of the vitamin D receptor and its ligand (1,25 hydroxyvitamin D3)to the nucleus which results in impaired vitamin D utilization and systemically will result in rickets if high dietary levels of whole wheat are chronically consumed.

In animal models (including primates) rickets are routinely induced by feeding high amounts of whole wheat. In adult females rickets results in a narrowed pelvis which dramatically increases mortality during childbirth. Hence, the adoption of whole wheat staples in Neolithic Northern European populations represented a powerful selection pressure which caused natural selection to chose genes which could overcome the rachitogenic effects of whole wheat. Two evolutionary strategies were selected. 1) Extreme dermal de-pigmentation to maximize UV exposure to increase vitamin D synthesis, and 2) the impairment of WGA absorption and internalization. The first mechanism is obvious, the 2nd is not as apparent.

The high incidence of adult lactase persistence (70-90 %) in certain N. European populations resulted from the rapid assimilation of the LCT(MIM603202) gene into the genome of these populations during the Neolithic. Lactase is an enzyme technically known as lactase phorizin hydrolase or LPH. LPH is a carbohydrate enzyme (glycosidase) belonging to the beta galactosidase family and it catalyzes the sugar beta-galactosidase in addition to catalyzing lactose, the sugar in milk. Beta galactosamine is a key structural sugar in the EGF-R. Hence the adult retention of LPH was strongly selected in Neolithic N. European populations because it could compete with WGA for the EGF-R and thereby, in effect, displace WGA from the EGF-R. WGA preferentially binds the sugar n-acetylglucosamine which is also present in the EGF-R. Consequently, the evolutionary selection for LPH occurred as direct competition for the EGF-R rather than LPH binding WGA directly.

In summary then, the simulataneous selection for LPH and dermal de-pigmentation were two changes in the genome of Northern Europeans that were a direct evolutionary response to increased consumption of whole wheat.

Our group is currently conducting one final experiment in humans before writing this concept up and submitting it for publication. I thought you would be interested in knowing that your supposition that consumption of cereals was indeed the environmental factor that tipped the scales regarding extreme dermal depigmentation. Now we have the answer.

Cordially,
Loren

Loren Cordain, Ph.D., Professor
Department of Health and Exercise Science
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO 80523
tel: (970) 491-7436
fax: (970) 491-0445
email: lcordain@cahs.colostate.edu
http://www.thepaleodiet.com


See Also:
Quote:

Got Milk? Got Grain? - Got ADHD!! (and much more)
http://breakfornews.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4046

_________________
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They only function when open.


Last edited by Fintan on Thu Apr 07, 2016 1:01 pm; edited 19 times in total
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Rumpl4skn



Joined: 11 Feb 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fintan wrote:
You can check the constituients of many foods here:
http://breakfornews.com/nutrients/
or
http://www.foodcomp.dk/fcdb_alphlist.asp

But neither of those sites lists dry roasted peanuts - just oil-roasted peanuts and peanut butter.

I'll take your word they are not good, since the peanut itself is the prime ingredient - but I'm curious as to the comp of dry roasted peanuts, which is what I ate the other day.

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kathy
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Grams per 100g serving

Peanuts
Aspartic acid 3.416 g
Glutamic acid 5.852 g

Wheat Flour
Aspartic acid 420
Glutamic acid 3300

Salmon
Aspartic acid 2110
Glutamic acid 3090


As you see peanuts contain more glutamic acid than even wheat.
And that glutamic acid is present in the form of glutamate, so it is the
same molecule as in wheat, with the same digestive effects. Cashews,
pistachios, and almonds are also very high in glutamic acid.

By comparison there is glutamic acid in Salmon and other meats, but it is
not in the form of glutamic salt.

So when you see glutamic acid in a food, that does not mean that it
automatically has digestive implications.

However glutamic and aspartic acids have biochemical effects on the
brain, but that is a separate issue.

Aspartic and glutamic acids are neurostimulators. In full health, we can
tolerate foods containing these two with no problem, but in moderation.

Excess levels in the brain are associated with seizures, pain syndromes,
insomnia, and neurodegenerative diseases. High glutamic and aspartic
acid levels may intensify siezures, migraine, peripheral neuropathy as in
ALS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome etc.

http://dogtorj.tripod.com/id33.html

Fintan and Kathy
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Rumpl4skn



Joined: 11 Feb 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, okay... no more peanuts. Laughing

I think I'll drop the diary approach here, because it's becoming tedious, and just perhaps relate items of interest as they occur.

The clarified butter (Ghee) is pretty cool. It seems to be the very essence of butter flavor, with twice the grease factor. Cool I believe this stuff is a super-lubricant worthy of use on the space shuttle. Man, is this stuff greasy, and penetrative! It will soak through a hard-crusted bagel like it's cheesecloth.

Dispensing it is also a challenge, since it comes in a jar, and has the consistency of heavily-pulped orange juice. You have to dip a broad-faced knife or spoon in, and let it drip where you want it. Which is just as well, because you don't get as much, and I'm not kidding myself about the calorie content of this stuff. It is rich butter fat, pure and simple, sans the Elmer's glue.

Also found some GF bagels that are absolutely killer (he said as he took another bite). And the best part is that I truly don't crave lunch 30 minutes after breakfast anymore.

I don't have a scale in the house, but I can tell that weight is already dropping off, judging by the fit o' me jeans. Wink
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bri



Joined: 16 Jun 2006
Posts: 3170
Location: Capacious Creek

PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I feel like shit lately. I've been eating a lot of dairy, wheat, and processed meats. Who knew?

When I was eating well I was able to quit cigs no problem and I was generally in well-being, even for winter! Now I'm back smoking since I've been eating junk and I feel abnormally tense, stuffed up, and generally fatigued. Exercise and sun(perhaps due to the high levels of wheat?) plus over the counter "vitamins" only seem to help on a mini level.

Add me to the list of guinea pigs.
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Continuity



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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The people I know who are following this diet have reported noticeable gains in general health, and (sensible levels of) weight-loss.

They report having more energy, generally feeling better, and weirdly enough, just like Rump - they report that when they've eaten one of their GFCF meals, they don't get hungry again really soon after - it's almost like their bodies are able to extract all the nutrients from the food they've eaten, so they don't get hungry again for a good while. Wink

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bri



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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Continuity wrote:
they don't get hungry again really soon after


That's another huge problem, crap food only fills you up in large amounts and frequent meals. So you are spending extra money just to fill your tummy and feel like glob of glue with no reason to live.


Why don't we talk budget? A lot of "organic" or "gluten-free" foods are overpriced. I've considered a list of benefits to a switch:

-avoiding wheat and dairy will cut my budget way down(can this be assumed?)

- grow your own produce, If I can do this anyone can, and buying from local markets

- Cutting down on meat in general will help, and will give me time to find some decent meat!

-many of these "organic" foods are not organic, so it's not worth the extra money

Rumpl, do you spend more money on food now, less, or relatively the same amount?

What's the general grocery list for you healthy(gluten/casein free) folks? Of course I know our bodies are all different but I'm just getting a basic idea here.


Last edited by bri on Mon Mar 17, 2008 3:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
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